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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #1 
Beside the somewhat mandatory Chapman Tool set... what else do you now realize you just can't do without in your basic or-not-so-basic VSM tool kit?

Personally, I'd feel ill-prepared if I didn't have a spray can of Tri-Flo and that super crazy simple zoom spout oiler from Lilly White. Omg, how did I ever get by with out that? I forget I have it. It's apart of the furniture.

The old hair-drier. Yep, it's right there on the bench.
I have a double-ended dental pick, crazy useful even if it's just gathering lint.
There's an assortment of small screwdrivers ala Singer, Kenmore etc...
(my fav as of late is this super cool Standard)
Magnifying glass.
Wire cutter/crimps
Rubber mallet,
small ball peen.
Cotton rags.
Magnet.
Bag of rubber bands, lol.
Extra light bulbs, new needles, and probably a half dozen 66, 15 and White bobbins. Extra 15 bobbin case. New test thread, light and dark.
Boxed single edge new razor blades.
A few strips of Emory paper or equal (600+ grit).
Singer motor grease (I still have a fair amount)

The more advanced kit of soldering gun, solder, flux, shrink tubes, wiring crimps etc. A small box all on their own. The third hand stand. Etc.

 

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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #2 
Split ring pliers.
ETA: correction, perhaps may be considered lock ring pliers. Flattened ends, expand when squeezed.

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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WI Lori
Split ring pliers


The ones with the exchangeable ends or the solid dedicated ends?

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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #4 
Ours happened to be fixed, not swappable. In another life, DH was a certified Honda motorcycle and Arctic Cat Master Cat mechanic.
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #5 
Yeah, I use my double-ended dental pick all the time.  Probably mostly for cleaning out the slots of screws before putting a screwdriver to them.  OTOH, I can't imagine finding a use for one of the screwdrivers supplied as an accessory with the machine.  Far too small and poorly made for any kind of stuck screw.  Even for the non-stuck ones, I prefer a "real" screwdriver.

I never use sprays -- not enough control.  I have droppers containing SM oil and PB Blaster (that gets sprayed into the bottle).

I'd add:   thread snips, and a small length of right-angle aluminum that I use when freeing stuck slide plates.  (It goes between the small hammer, and the slide plate, so the plate doesn't get damaged.)

Oh -- and #0000 steel wool, and an assortment of brass brushes.

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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #6 
And then the 10,000 q-tips.
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hilltophomesteader

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Reply with quote  #7 
All of the above, including a huge bag of cotton balls.  I prefer my Tri-Flow in the squeeze bottle with straw rather than spray.  I like to wrap a fog of fine steel wool around the end of a Q-tip.....and my most favorite/cherished tool of all (drum roll, please)  A big beautiful box of disposable non-latex gloves size M from Costco, used liberally!!!!!  Can't touch all that dirt & Tri-Flow without 'em!
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khogue

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Reply with quote  #8 
I bought a case of alcohol prep pads from an estate sale last year sometime, they aren't wet enough to drip and tiny enough to fit into nooks and crannies to wipe off old oil gunk inside. 

I use serger tweezers and a long handled horse hair paintbrush for lint and dust. 

disposable gloves
cut up t shirts
magnifiers
flashlight

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stitchntime

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Reply with quote  #9 
A small brass hammer and a locksmith file set.  A high quality set of hollow-ground precision screwdrivers, like a gunsmith would use.

I've converted my firearms toolbox to a VSM toolbox.  There's a lot of crossover believe it or not.

greg
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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgf
Yeah, I use my double-ended dental pick all the time.  Probably mostly for cleaning out the slots of screws before putting a screwdriver to them.  OTOH, I can't imagine finding a use for one of the screwdrivers supplied as an accessory with the machine.  Far too small and poorly made for any kind of stuck screw.  Even for the non-stuck ones, I prefer a "real" screwdriver.

I never use sprays -- not enough control.  I have droppers containing SM oil and PB Blaster (that gets sprayed into the bottle).

I'd add:   thread snips, and a small length of right-angle aluminum that I use when freeing stuck slide plates.  (It goes between the small hammer, and the slide plate, so the plate doesn't get damaged.)

Oh -- and #0000 steel wool, and an assortment of brass brushes.


That tiny little screwdriver -- that's to adjust the bobbin tension on the side of all my vintage machines (except the Two Spool).  Otherwise, the only screwdriver that would fit that tiny little screw is one from an eyeglass repair kit! 

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HelenAnn

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Reply with quote  #11 
Bamboo skewers of different sizes and thickness. They don't scratch (decals not included) great for cleaning cracks and screws and little holes. They don't break like tooth picks. I pick them up when ever I see a new type.
Knit Cotton rags are a must and getting harder to find.
Large sheet pan to contain machine I'm working on, sometimes I need to feed people on the kitchen table.

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penny

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Reply with quote  #12 
Magnetic parts holder bowl. No more hunting for lost small parts.
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #13 
Oh yeah -- forgot to mention my muffin tins.  I have 3 of them, 6 muffins each.  I finally labeled them A, B, and C, and labeled the muffins 1 through 6.  On my last machine I filled them in order, and when it came time to reassemble...  I didn't have to remember what I'd done, and when.  The "when" part, at any rate, was taken care of.

Those magnetic parts bowls are cool, though.  I always wanted one in the garage, where it would have stuck to the fender of the car, or the tank of the motorcycle.

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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #14 
A BFSD and a BFH. A Chapman set, and an impact driver for when the BFSD isn't enough, but you'll still need the BFH.
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victrola

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HelenAnn
Bamboo skewers of different sizes and thickness. They don't scratch (decals not included) great for cleaning cracks and screws and little holes. They don't break like tooth picks. I pick them up when ever I see a new type.
Knit Cotton rags are a must and getting harder to find.


Regarding toothpicks, and presumably also skewers: beware, they aren't always so innocent. I once used a toothpick to clean out the needleclamp (the part where the needle goes in) on an Elna Supermatic. I didn't think I was probing too roughly, yet the toothpick made the piece fall apart. The piece seemed to have been made of sintered metal, so was more vulnerable to crumbling than, say, holes for screws or slots on screwheads.

Regarding knit cotton rags, in case this helps: they are never in short supply for me as I have simply to cull my t-shirts, and then voila, plenty of knit cotton.
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #16 
Just wanted to say thanks. This is absolutely fabulous. If someone new to VSM repair stumbled in tomorrow, this thread has great stuff. There are items here I had not thought to incorporate and will try soon. There are methods I hadn't considered and it's all good. Wow. Keep 'em coming. It's a great read!
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by victrola


Regarding toothpicks, and presumably also skewers: beware, they aren't always so innocent. I once used a toothpick to clean out the needleclamp (the part where the needle goes in) on an Elna Supermatic. I didn't think I was probing too roughly, yet the toothpick made the piece fall apart. The piece seemed to have been made of sintered metal, so was more vulnerable to crumbling than, say, holes for screws or slots on screwheads.

Regarding knit cotton rags, in case this helps: they are never in short supply for me as I have simply to cull my t-shirts, and then voila, plenty of knit cotton.


Doesn't sound like that clamp was long for this world, if a toothpick broke it apart!

I use my old T-shirts too (which are usually long-sleeved -- win!), but I've realized that my dislike of white T-shirts is a disadvantage in this case.  I need to make another trip to the goodwill...

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #18 
I use a lot of what has already been mentioned. What is also helpful for me is small glass jars with lids (like recycled jelly/jam jars).  This works for me to store small parts and the cover prevents losing parts when they are knocked over!  Also good for cleaning screws, etc with evaporust or whatever cleaner/degreaser/rust remover you are using.
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #19 
I also have used dental brushes or airbrush cleaning brushes.  Also toothbrushes and gun cleaning brushes have been used around here.

Janey

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #20 
     I have to mention a trick I learned from my dad on glass jars (mentioned in a post above).  He used baby food bottles but I use small glass jelly jars (good excuse to buy them).  I take the lid and screw it under a wooden shelf.  This gives me an instantly identifiable (through the clear glass) assortment to store many different pieces and parts for hardware storage.  If a jar breaks time to get more jelly.  Screws on and off in seconds.  

  Surprised nobody mentioned magnets.  I have some pretty large chunks of super magnets.  I can sweep an entire room with it on the end of a stick and pick up all metal off the floor.  It is amazing the small metal splinters that get picked up (that no longer can end in a little one's barefeet) doing this and find that missing screw also at same time.  All magnets are not the same.  I use the large ones folks use to make axial flux generators for homebrew wind turbines.....the ones that can smash fingers if multiple are put together and keep it to only one magnet.  

Best regards,
Mike
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Bags

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Reply with quote  #21 
What about a flask?  Oh, sorry that's in my knitting/spinning bag.  [biggrin]

This is such a great thread.  Thanks Jim for starting this and thanks to everyone who has added to it.  Now to go around the house and see what we have and what we need!

Carol


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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bags
What about a flask?


Hip-pocket - because I'm not always at the work bench.

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GuidCA

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Reply with quote  #23 
All great stuff - I love learning what tools others are using.

I'll step back and say that for me, the most useful tool is an organized bench! Like many folks my shop/play time is limited by work, kids, Little League etc. so I need to use my time as efficiently as possible...and we live in a small house, and I love tools. So I need to cram my tools into as tight a space as possible, which I'm slowly getting better at doing.

My bench area - I think my entire shop space is around 100 square feet, and a lot of that space is dedicated to woodworking tools (band saws, drill press, mitre box etc). So I try to keep my work area like a little ships galley where I just have to turn around to grab a tool (you can't see it but behind that bench is my woodworking bench and my shop bench with drill press, machinist box etc.) I covered the wall with recycled wood shelving, so I can move tool racks around as I play with the best way to work.

 a bench.jpg


My goal is to be able to reach the tools I use most of the time, so I've shamelessly stolen ideas from youtube, woodworking websites etc.

Here's a nut driver rack made from a strip of leather and brass screws and washers. Not used much for sewing machines, but they really speed things up when they are the right tool.

b nut drivers.jpg


I likes me some hammers...and this rack is made from strips of wood from a recycled 100 year old piano. 


c hammer rack.jpg


For years I thought Dremels were toys, but for small de-rusting and polishing jobs they're the bomb! With a cut-off wheel you can cut through hardened bike chain or padlocks (be patient, you'll be at it a while...) Being able to just grab a Dremel that's already plugged in is hugely productive, and having one already set up for polishing and one for wire wheeling is that much faster.

d dremels.jpg
 

This plier rack is similar to the hammer rack, and lets me cram a lot of tools into a small space, without having to fumble around in a drawer:

e plier rack.jpg

My wife came home from Ikea with a $4 pine shelf for the kids room. I stole it, slapped on some amber shellac and drilled it full of holes and it keeps my screwdriver and awls obsession somewhat usable. I'd prefer to not have to go three rows deep, but it reflects my limited, and precious, wall space. I highly recommend Wiha screwdrivers, but their tips are very hard and the little ones will shatter if you torque too hard.

g ikea $4 screwdriver rack.jpg

I don't use it much, but a lighted magnifier is superb if you play around with sharpening saws or grinding small bits.

i lighted magnifyer.jpg 

Like others have mentioned, I think the most underrated tools I use are an odd assortment of dental picks and surgical implements I inherited from my dad, who was a research scientist. I'm constantly reaching for little scrapers to remove 80 year old grime, free up the slot on a screw to remove it, etc.

j dental tools tweezers scapels.jpg

I'm always afraid of scratching delicate assemblies when I use metal tweezers and picks, so I think my single most unexpectedly useful tool is a pair of PLASTIC tweezers that I use to pull out lint from around sewing machine hooks.

k plastic tweezers for lint.jpg
  l scrapers.jpg 

Partly because I'm a klutz, I'm surprised at how often I need to un-bend a piece of metal or a machine nomenclature plate. If you like hammers you'll love anvils...this 11 pounder isn't really tough enough to USE as an anvil but it's a useful flat surface.

m anvil and ball pein.jpg


I always dread re-wireing a foot controller, but when I can get access to a long enough piece of the wire these wire strippers are magic.

n wire stripper.jpg 

One tool I love but don't have a picture of is a $1 vintage screwdriver that I ground down to be VERY thin. I'm surprised how many old screws have a very thin cutout for the driver, and even my Chapman bits and little Wiha drivers can be too thick to get the job done.

On the subject of really useful cheap tools, I got this magnetic tool holder at an estate sale and it holds the little screwdrivers and Yankee ratcheting screwdrivers that I will use more often once I get around to grinding the tips down so they actually fit on needle plate screws...

h magnetic yankee ratchets and mini screwdrivers.jpg


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Bags

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim/Steelsewing


Hip-pocket - because I'm not always at the work bench.
 

Flask takes too long if not knitting or spinning, kitchen counter![rofl]

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Bags

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuidCA
All great stuff - I love learning what tools others are using.

I'll step back and say that for me, the most useful tool is an organized bench! Like many folks my shop/play time is limited by work, kids, Little League etc. so I need to use my time as efficiently as possible...and we live in a small house, and I love tools. So I need to cram my tools into as tight a space as possible, which I'm slowly getting better at doing.

My bench area - I think my entire shop space is around 100 square feet, and a lot of that space is dedicated to woodworking tools (band saws, drill press, mitre box etc). So I try to keep my work area like a little ships galley where I just have to turn around to grab a tool (you can't see it but behind that bench is my woodworking bench and my shop bench with drill press, machinist box etc.) I covered the wall with recycled wood shelving, so I can move tool racks around as I play with the best way to work.

 a bench.jpg


My goal is to be able to reach the tools I use most of the time, so I've shamelessly stolen ideas from youtube, woodworking websites etc.

Here's a nut driver rack made from a strip of leather and brass screws and washers. Not used much for sewing machines, but they really speed things up when they are the right tool.

b nut drivers.jpg


I likes me some hammers...and this rack is made from strips of wood from a recycled 100 year old piano. 


c hammer rack.jpg


For years I thought Dremels were toys, but for small de-rusting and polishing jobs they're the bomb! With a cut-off wheel you can cut through hardened bike chain or padlocks (be patient, you'll be at it a while...) Being able to just grab a Dremel that's already plugged in is hugely productive, and having one already set up for polishing and one for wire wheeling is that much faster.

d dremels.jpg
 

This plier rack is similar to the hammer rack, and lets me cram a lot of tools into a small space, without having to fumble around in a drawer:

e plier rack.jpg

My wife came home from Ikea with a $4 pine shelf for the kids room. I stole it, slapped on some amber shellac and drilled it full of holes and it keeps my screwdriver and awls obsession somewhat usable. I'd prefer to not have to go three rows deep, but it reflects my limited, and precious, wall space. I highly recommend Wiha screwdrivers, but their tips are very hard and the little ones will shatter if you torque too hard.

g ikea $4 screwdriver rack.jpg

I don't use it much, but a lighted magnifier is superb if you play around with sharpening saws or grinding small bits.

i lighted magnifyer.jpg 

Like others have mentioned, I think the most underrated tools I use are an odd assortment of dental picks and surgical implements I inherited from my dad, who was a research scientist. I'm constantly reaching for little scrapers to remove 80 year old grime, free up the slot on a screw to remove it, etc.

j dental tools tweezers scapels.jpg

I'm always afraid of scratching delicate assemblies when I use metal tweezers and picks, so I think my single most unexpectedly useful tool is a pair of PLASTIC tweezers that I use to pull out lint from around sewing machine hooks.

k plastic tweezers for lint.jpg
  l scrapers.jpg 

Partly because I'm a klutz, I'm surprised at how often I need to un-bend a piece of metal or a machine nomenclature plate. If you like hammers you'll love anvils...this 11 pounder isn't really tough enough to USE as an anvil but it's a useful flat surface.

m anvil and ball pein.jpg


I always dread re-wireing a foot controller, but when I can get access to a long enough piece of the wire these wire strippers are magic.

n wire stripper.jpg 

One tool I love but don't have a picture of is a $1 vintage screwdriver that I ground down to be VERY thin. I'm surprised how many old screws have a very thin cutout for the driver, and even my Chapman bits and little Wiha drivers can be too thick to get the job done.

On the subject of really useful cheap tools, I got this magnetic tool holder at an estate sale and it holds the little screwdrivers and Yankee ratcheting screwdrivers that I will use more often once I get around to grinding the tips down so they actually fit on needle plate screws...

h magnetic yankee ratchets and mini screwdrivers.jpg


Brian, I envy you being so organized.  Maybe when I grow up?

Carol
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hilltophomesteader

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Reply with quote  #26 
Oh my gosh what a great list of tools & ideas!!!  Brian!  Your organization skills are AMAZING - I hope your chosen profession uses that amazing skill!

Another thing that helps me a great deal is my rolling wood cart thingy.  My hubby used to build cabinets and had these rolly cart jobbies - about 18" X 36" cabinet plywood with good quality heavy duty wheels mounted under.  I can keep a current machine or two on it and roll it under the table when I'm not actually working on them.  No doubt someone has already mentioned a good bright flashlight, too?

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #27 
Brian,

What an amazing workshop you have.  Just goes to show space is not always the key to a successful and organized place.  Thanks for sharing!
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GuidCA

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Reply with quote  #28 
Thanks for the compliments on the shop - I get an inordinate amount of satisfaction from good tools (the older the better), set up for easy access.

On the subject of Dremels, one thing I should have added is the little Dremel bit rack I made from a piece of scrap wood. It's stone-cold simple, but keeps the bits right in front of me. I find that being able to grab the Dremel (already plugged in) and snag a bit from this little rack is really helpful. 
The rack is just a piece of wood with holes drilled in the size of the accessories shafts. Back when I kept all these bits in the plastic Dremel cases I found it was just too much work to leave the bench, walk over to the shelf and grab the case, open it and pull out the bit, walk back to the bench etc etc. This isn't pretty but it saves a lot of time.

f dremel bits.jpg 


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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #29 
These are the old tools that are getting a place on the pegboard. 
20200307_135048.jpg 
20200307_135054.jpg  


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Reply with quote  #30 

Two tips I learned on the other forum.
#1 Use a pool noodle to rest a machine when it is tipped back.

#2 Plug the Dremel into a sewing machine foot control. 

I found a good tiny screw driver with a nice handle at true value hardware. Actually I bought several and keep them in different places. 

I keep a small travel tool kit for cleaning a machine in an eye glasses case. Iā€™m amazed what can be accomplished with such a small kit. 


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pgf

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Reply with quote  #31 

Wow, Brian -- thanks for the tour!  I just love seeing a good shop, and how it's set up.  My space is about the same as yours, maybe 12x12, and I, too, share the space with the water heater, and the gas and water meters, plus the boiler and various steam pipes.  The previous owner set it up with a few dedicated screwdriver racks above his 8 foot bench, and I still use one of them, with some holes added for the little bitty ones to go in between the big ones.  The second bench on the opposite wall was second-hand from a Carnegie Tech shop, where my Dad was a prof.  It's an old wood-working bench with the square holes along the front for the original bench vise.  That had been replaced by a 3-1/2" utility vise when my Dad got it, and I'm still using it, after moving the workbench from the family home near Pittsburgh here to Boston.

Most of my tools are on pegboards.  They're finicky, and getting the kind of pegboard accessories that fit snugly or have the clips to keeping them in place, but I find them useful.

And Pam mentioned rolling carts:  I put casters on a lot of things:  my bandsaw, various lumber carts, etc.  It's the only was to survive in a small space, where you need to move the collection of poplar scraps to inspect the sump pump, or need to make use of the 12" space on the floor under the bottom shelf under the workbench.

But Dremels.  I have one, and I do use it, but I have never had such a hate/hate relationship with a tool!  All they're designed to do is bounce off the part you're cutting/grinding/polishing so that they can nick and gouge some other part you're trying to preserve!  

paul

p.s.  Steve -- I think you're missing a screwdriver.
p.p.s.  Miriam -- a pool noodle!  Brilliant!

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #32 
(Perhaps I should explain Marilyn in the corner.  I'm not a "pin-up" kind of guy, and Julia is as feminist as they come, but 30 years ago we were overseas and moved into an apartment that sorely needed something on the walls.  We were out shopping for something else entirely when we spotted that lifesize poster, and we both thought it was a riot. We put it up in the livingroom of the apartment.  It somehow got shipped back, and when we got this house it was obvious where she should go!)
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #33 
Hello group,

  Comment on peg boards here.  They are not available in this country for what I can tell and would be yummy termite food likely without allot of treatment.  I use large steel matting and buy the hooks used in stores that are made out of metal and hang those hooks on the steel matting squares.  Epoxy primer and epoxy black paint mixed then applied with brush (after thinning down with epoxy reducer which is an extremely potent solvent by the way) then the hooks.  I buy them at the equivalent to the local dollar general where they're sold for local merchants.

  On pool noodles, another item not available here, I ask a gent to get them at a close by Dollar General store but they are seasonal in the North.  After we get them we use them in the pool so first their used as awesome packing material in crates and then recycled for their original intention which is pretty backwards.

Best regards,
Mike

Edited to add a comment on the Dremel brand tools.  There is a shorter, lower cost one, and a longer more expensive one.  A co worker commented that the longer one I bought was so much better as he had one of the shorter versions burning it up and subsequently buying the more expensive version.  I bought a local version for 220v that is shorter and sure enough it burnt out.  The longer one is 110v so I just use it with a step down transformer and never an issue for many years now.  Pay now or pay later......
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Reply with quote  #34 
A funny thing about Dremels. I've picked up a ton of bits and attachments for the tool at various estate sales, and now I find myself having to search for more. It wasn't supposed to be this way. Apparently the tool has been around longer than I imagined and the body of it has changed over the years. I thought I'd scored big on several attachments, only to find they didn't fit my newer model. So now I'm actively searching for a Dremel 'Moto-tool" which probably goes back into the 60s. Heh, oh well. Either I find a vintage tool, or some newer attachments. One of the two. =)

1_97df0a8d919cb980ea574fd9a9b44ea2.jpg


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Farmer John

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Reply with quote  #35 
What is it about the older attachments that won't work on the newer Dremel ?  I use a Singer foot controller and outlet to power my Dremels....off, on and speed control with my foot.  The thin cut off wheels are great.
John
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #36 
Hi Jim,

  I suspect you might not have the right collet (if I am describing that part correctly).  There are at least two sizes of inserts that fit into this for different size shafts.  Then there is an attachment for drill bits that can take a range of sizes of drill bits and is variable.  Maybe for yours it is the threaded portion/collar  for the collet that is different?  If so, I wonder if you can take the modern collets and make them work in your Dremel.   I used to have a Craftsman version of the Dremel and the Craftsman miniature drill press.  I now have the Dremel version.  When it comes to Dremel attachments they are not all made equal.  I've found the wire wheels can be hazardous with bits flying off like wire fragments of a grenade.  However, I buy allot of attachments directly from China.  When it comes to cutting discs there are the ones that are like wafers that snap in half in your hand.  Then there is the very expensive one that has it's own shaft that you press on and it turns and locks in place...also being thicker but waay too expensive.  More recently I found a very low cost fiber based cut off wheel that is like a miniature version of cut off discs for our hand grinders.  Super incredibly low cost and super durable.  We use our Dremel on occasion for rust removal on cast iron industrial Union Special feed off the arm pedestals (we are soon going to be up to five of these monster behemoths) and also antique treadles with great success.  Most of the time we are into hand operated drills and grinders for most of the work.  We have buffing wheels with polishing rouge for our hand grinders but also for the Dremel but rarely used on the Dremel.  One use for the Dremel that works pretty good is when I'm cutting pieces of Tuff-N-lite which is a scuff/cut resistant woven material.  The cut off wheels do a great job on small pieces of that amazing made-in-USA material.  We have the snake attachment but most don't realize I think the body of the tool is supposed to be hung at a higher elevation than the end of the snake piece that is being used with attachments.  We even have the mini router kit but I've honestly never had a use for it (but the router bits are awesome).

Best regards,
Mike
  
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #37 
Heh. No. No. I didn't explain that well.  It's not about what won't fit into the tool. It's about what the tool will not fit into. The body of the newer models are larger in diameter than the original moto-tool. So the new body shape will not fit the smaller round collars of the the moto-tool bench stand, router frame, or drill press. As far as I know, all the bits that fit into the tool are fine.

s-l640.jpg

I'm sure I'll find one. No big hurry. I have two bodies as it is and see them available quite often.


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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
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My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #38 
Hi Jim,

  Possibly you can use this as an excuse to get two Dremel, one for the vintage holder and one for the more modern drill press.  I recommend the longer more expensive one as outlined above.  The shorter ones (same diameter body) just fail with use.  So I see a vintage model 600 cast iron holder on eBay and wonder if it will fit your older tool.  You got me searching and I saw a combination holder set for 15.99 out of Hong Kong free shipping with lots of positive feedback so I bought it.  One piece is a holder that clamps to the table edge.  The other piece is telescopic with a hanger so one can use the snake attachment while keeping the Dremel high above like it is supposed to be.

  Another educational/beneficial V.S.S. thread/topic !   

  Tomorrow is a very busy day!  Likely another 10 workers.  We are on a terrace property.  The wall to the lower section is about 8 feet tall or so.  I'm starting a screened enclosure that has a metal roof.  It will be 50 feet long!  Width was going to be 8 feet but now it looks like it will be wider.  We will make a table of 3/4 inch marine grade plywood with fiberglass on 100 percent to make it bug proof then buy formica in the city covering it with that.  This will be a giant cutting table for our jeans/work pants set up.  Along the top will be a rail and pulleys so an electrical cable can run the length of the 50 foot table.  When retracted it will look like an accordion bellows for the electrical and the one end will have a frame that will support a pipe with pillow block bushings for the bolts of cloth .  I'm hoping we can make this in 2-3 weeks and see no reason why not....it will involve concrete re enforce flooring and cement bases for 2 inch OD pipe.

  So at one end of the spectrum we have our Dremel set up with it's tiny cut off wheels and at the other end of the spectrum we will have our work shop (kind of) with it's 50 foot long table and it's giant cutting tool for many many many layers of denim.  For smaller projects we have our 10 watt laser diode table that is run by a CNC that can also accept a router šŸ˜‰  It cuts material just fine.

Best regards,
Mike
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Margie

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Reply with quote  #39 
Thank you, Jim for the information about the Chapman tools.  Mine shipped this morning.  I have spent years using screwdrivers that I knew were wrong.  I just didn't know how to find the right ones.

I would like to add something to the Sewing Machine Repair Kit - puppy pads.  If someone already mentioned these, I missed it.  My machines go into a large tray covered with a puppy pad.  The trays are from under-the-bed storage boxes.  Since the boxes are full of fabric, the trays are not needed.  The pads are white so anything that falls is easy to find when you are taking a machine apart.  The trays have sides, so that prevents items from rolling off the workbench.  I also use the pads when I need to oil a treadle base that is in the house, or for all the other messy things I do.
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Chillin in NC

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Reply with quote  #40 
I use this tea strainer to spray / clean small parts.  It's stainless so corrosion is not an issue.  

Dan
20200828_161731 (Copy).jpg  20200828_162515 (Copy).jpg


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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #41 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Margie
Thank you, Jim for the information about the Chapman tools.  Mine shipped this morning. 


I love my Chapman set but if you've never owned one you do need to know that it's possible to snap a tip. They are designed that way - and easily ordered. They can take 'so much' torque and that so much should be more than enough in almost all cases. However, it can happen that you encounter a screw that was set x number of decades ago and doesn't want to move at all. So to avoid situations where crazy excessive torque might be needed, always soak down the ancient ones with a de-rusting or loosening agent of some sort. As so many have also mentioned sometimes a vibration helps (read: a tap or two with something hard) to get movement. The only time I ever had an issue was with the hook set screws in a 101. They're crazy small and had probably been there a hundred years. Other than that one outlier, the set is perfect for me. If I look right now, chances are it has the correct tip for needle plate screws sitting in it right this minute. lol

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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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Cowgirl

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Reply with quote  #42 
Thank you all for sharing! Taking notes.

One tool I find myself using a lot is a hemostat clamp (that I bought in a box of scissors at an auction) with the tiniest little needle nose tip. It fits in tiny spaces to pick out lint, and will clamp and hold small pieces when putting them back together. Wish I had another one - it sometimes wanders to my sewing area and I have to go run it down.
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Margie

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Reply with quote  #43 
Thank you, Jim, for the information about the torque of the Chapman tools.  I did read everything before I ordered.

The screw that is giving me fits this time is the one that holds the shuttle race on a Longford.  I have been soaking it for 4-5 days.  I am using Triflow because I am not sure the finish on this machine would accept much more than oil.  I am also having a problem getting the back slide plate off.  I have moved it slightly, but the shuttle race is in the way to do too much tapping.  It is a pretty little handcrank and I don't want to ruin her.

I love the idea of the tea strainer!
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #44 
Margie, is there enough room to employ the use of a wood block (pencil with both ends cut straight?) between the hammer and the slide plate? It might provide the advantage you need to loosen that plate.

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Margie

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Reply with quote  #45 
Thanks, Lori.  I will try a wood block.  I have been using a brass rod.  It is a bit cumbersome in the small space and the shuttle race is swinging freely.  I am so afraid I will damage it.  I have used the brass rod before for such problems, but I didn't have things moving around.

That reminds me...another tool for the toolkit is a brass rod.  It doesn't hurt metal when you hit it with a hammer.  The one I have been using is apparently an auto tool.  It belongs to my husband and when I asked him where it was, he told me that it was with the auto tools.  Or, it could just be something he made up.[smile] 
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Margie

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Reply with quote  #46 
Thank you, Lori.  The wood block worked.  It was actually a brass brush with a slim (1/2"x1/2") handle.  The handle was just the right size for this small machine.  I am going to start a post about this machine.  I need help identifying it.
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #47 
I'm glad to hear you tapped it free, Margie.
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Lori in Wisconsin
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HelenAnn

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Reply with quote  #48 
I have a set of brass punches and a brass hammer that work very well to tap those parts out without hurting them.
I also buy Brownells screw drivers and tips because I can get exactly what I need and not a bunch of other tips I'm not going to use. All of these are all gun smith  tools.
My husband thought I should get my own set when he noticed his brass tools were missing.

Someone posted about tools to use on sewing machines (can't remember where) and listed all the bit# needed for every screw on a singer. I can give a list of my Brownell bits if any one is interested. They are not inexpensive. They are made to break before the screw gets broken but they fit so well that rarely happens. Does it sound like I like them?

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denaliskyfire

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Reply with quote  #49 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HelenAnn
I have a set of brass punches and a brass hammer that work very well to tap those parts out without hurting them.
I also buy Brownells screw drivers and tips because I can get exactly what I need and not a bunch of other tips I'm not going to use. All of these are all gun smith  tools.
My husband thought I should get my own set when he noticed his brass tools were missing.

Someone posted about tools to use on sewing machines (can't remember where) and listed all the bit# needed for every screw on a singer. I can give a list of my Brownell bits if any one is interested. They are not inexpensive. They are made to break before the screw gets broken but they fit so well that rarely happens. Does it sound like I like them?


Brownells tools are the best! I like the Chapman set for off site work (portable), but my big workbench is in my gunsmith shop, and I have ALL the cool tools. (I *may* like to collect them [wink]). It's neat to see so many other cross-enthusiasts on here. Hey, a screw is a screw, right?

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