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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #1 
Wood repairs improve cosmetic appeal, function and durability. I have example pictures for a few different repairs. To improve reading, additional posts will be added, in this thread.

Wood repairs for missing wood require donor wood. My favorite source is old original wood. If large areas are missing, new veneer is used, old removed pieces are saved. Small bags of bass wood is available at Hobby Lobby. It cuts easily, glues and takes stain well.

This post shows repair on a treadle table around machine hinges. The black paint was retained for the glue procedure, it helps prevent glue absorption. If glue is absorbes in veneer top surface, it interferes with stain process.

Bass wood was used to replace missing veneer underlayment. It was glued and clamped prior to fitting replacement veneer. Blue painters tape is used on top of veneer to protect and hold in place while clamping.

Last picture shows after sanding, light stain and finish. I have a simple finish process that will be added in new thread.

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Dave in middle TN

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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #2 
Carving repair on drawer front. Two layers of basswood, was carved and stained. To help with carving, picture was taken and printed, stuck on for cut reference. The scale was a few percent large, but good starting point. Additional work was done for completion. Same cabinet as above.

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Dave in middle TN

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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #3 
Repair of big end Singer bentwood case. Top ofive end split off and missing. Similar wood carved to match broken joint, but otherwise rectangular shape for ease of clamping for gluing. After glue set part was contoured with saw, rasp and sandpaper, avoiding contact with original wood. Painters tape was used to surround, until final sanding. Only poor picture from clip of goodwill listing, shown last, see left top of picture.

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Dave in middle TN

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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #4 
Left side of paw leg missing. Paw leg ends are not one piece, two additional parts are glued on and shaped. When legs get wet, damage occurs. Similar to case end repair a rectangular block of walnut about 3/4" x 1 1/4" x 1 1/2" was glued on, and after shaped. We worried at first that part was lost at pickup, later reviewed craigs ad, add shown.

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Dave in middle TN

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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #5 
Three side panels were replaced on a model 48 cabinet. There were several square inches of missing veneer on each panel. The panel grain patterns were unique, the only realistic option was to replace. Dampening panels helped removal to some extent, but stubborn areas persisted. Heat gun help a bit, finally gave up and sanded off veneer and glue.

The top of cabinet was unscrewed for clamping access. Shelf boards, with additional span boards were arranged to clamp total veneer surface, with additional backing boards inside. Clamps were arranged at top and bottom. Worked one side at a time face up. Rehearsed clamping, prior to glue.

Veneer was purchased from Sharp Veneer Products. The match was amazing. https://www.ebay.com/str/sharpveneerproducts Veneer was in 7 1/2" x 42" strips, needed to splice two strips for sides. The veneer outer edge had sap wood, it was used to provide visual contrast at edges. Edges were set in place with overlapping. A metal strait edge clamped, utility knife cut thru both, for mating edges. Punched paper veneer tape stitched glue side, blue tape seals outside.

Applying glue was achieved with a textured rubber craft roller. For small areas a credit card server as spreader. Glue is applied to cabinet, not veneer.

Showing favorite clamps. The 4" reach C-clamps, most useful, little hand clamp good for chip repairs. Have several of each, never enough. ☺

Attached Images
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Dave in middle TN

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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #6 
NICE!
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thank you.
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Dave in middle TN
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charley26

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Reply with quote  #8 
Wonderful. Thank you.
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HelenAnn

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Reply with quote  #9 
Kit could you post some photos of the actual clamping. I always need visual help. It seem like I end up needing much larger clamps. Thanks
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HelenAnn central Minnesota
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Reply with quote  #10 
We were making two drawers with a shelf on the top over the weekend.  We glued a tiny piece of wood that had been cut and sanded to fit with some brown tinted epoxy.  Came out really nice.  Since we needed a small clamp we carefully adjusted one of these for light but just enough tension.  Made for welding but worked fantastic.  Best regards, MikeImage result for welding vice grips
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #11 
Helen Ann,
Another recent post about bentwood cases, shows clamps for base joint repairs.
https://www.victoriansweatshop.com/post/singer-bentwood-case-a-serious-rescue-10180811?pid=1308962124 post #11

If need is past clamp reach of 4", stiffener boards are used, and clamp at ends. Shims can be used under stiffeners, for slightly more pressure at clamp point, if desired.

Please share an example of specific needs, I will try to setup and get pictures.

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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #12 
Kit, great repair/replace of the carved drawer front! These seem to get lost before any other major damage occurs. Would you mind sharing more info of the process, layer thickness, tools, how you matched the stain?
DH cut lots of basswood lumber last year, and it dried nice and straight. Now I have a use for it!

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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #13 
Lori,
I use a caliper to measure thickness. As jaws of caliper open, the other end, sticks out, same amount, for depth measurements. It is better to have a bit more, and sand down excess.
It is difficult to explain how to carve. A combination of straight, convex, and concave carving tools are used. Without cutting, gauge an original example, see if the tool fits contour, and a cutting stroke is possible. Start by removing small amount, and repeat to desired shape. It is much about cause and effect. Important part is, work safely. I find working a few minutes at a time is beneficial. When returning, a new insite of appearance happens.
Basswood seems easy to cut, but texture might be rough. A bit of sanding helps with that.
About staining. That too is cause and effect, hue and shade. Try on a scrap of same wood used. Texture of wood, how, sanded, changes absorption. A wet oil stain is similar to final look, but adding varnish may add some amber, and shine. Start light, it is easier to darken. Stains absorb, hard to lighten. I only have a few stain colors and mix if necessary.

Attached Images
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Dave in middle TN

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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #14 
Been working on four bentwood cases this week. They were all rough, but challenges are good. I had idea, if a few were ready for finish at same time, it would save time and materials in application process. I got in over my head, but making progress.

All had minor loose veneer and base joints issues.Two bases needed corner gussets. One case was missing bottom, another bottom was delaminated, and rippled. One top had missing end. End was salvaged from shipping damaged top. One top with hole.

Posting before and after, some after will not be available before Monday.
Added after for case hole, and base accessory compartment repair. Added pictures of bwc top with handle push thru, and severe dents. Starting by wetting dented inside, pressing until dry with salvaged case end.

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Dave in middle TN

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #15 
Big job!  Nice work, as always.
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #16 
Pgf, Thank you.

Added above pics of after finish for case top hole, and base repair.

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Dave in middle TN
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #17 
Is that shellac?
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #18 
I use Minwax polyurethane. Apply with nylon panty hose. Can make make about 10 pads for $1. Dip in varnish, or from spout of rectangular cans. Wipe slowly one time, about 1 1/2" path, overlap slightly. Use green 3M abrasive pad between coats. 3-4 coats. More in this post. https://www.victoriansweatshop.com/post/simply-restore-the-beauty-10183524?pid=1308988154



I have tried new Minwax polycrylic, really weird. Looks like milk, turns clear, can be sticky, does not was to flow. Similar to spreading contact when below 70F. It was recommended to use over decals. It is clear, not amber.

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Dave in middle TN
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #19 
Nice.  You don't get bubbles from the nylon mesh?  I've used poly a lot, but I've always had a love/hate relationship with it -- it always runs, or gets bubbles.  I think that mainly I'm just not patient enough to do the number of coats it takes to make it perfect.  Now I mainly just use an oil finish.  Not as authentic looking, but way easier, and easy to touch up later.

paul

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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #20 
Paul, No bubbles at about 2" per second wipe. Fast as 4" will make bubbles at cooler temperatures. Wave a heat gun 15" away pops bubbles, trick for cool weather. Application 70-85F works best. At 65F it seems to gel, leaves grain open. First or second application against grain, helps fill grain.


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Dave in middle TN
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #21 
Thanks.  I'll have to try the heat gun trick on the bubbles.  I did learn some time ago that not painting in the cold.  When I use rattle cans I always try and warm the piece up before starting, especially if I have to do the spraying outdoors (which is usually).

paul

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