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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #1 
These are the files I used to 3D print a bracket to convert my 1929 embossed White Family Rotary from electric to hand crank with one of the reproduction singer cranks. It's not the exact file I used because I had to make the screw holes larger, so I fixed that in the model. 

Here's a folder with the two files zip white fr hand crank bracket.zip     
Because forum attachments fail sometimes, here's the same folder on google drive, plus it has all the pictures from this thread (I promise not to delete it) https://drive.google.com/open?id=1pxP98HaBIwJBFMRA5fCz92BSvAdsD_sf
It includes the Autocad .dwg file, if you want to view or modify it in CAD software and the .stl file, which you can print with a 3D printer. Mine was printed solid (100% infill) in PLA.

Here's the link where you can buy it from me through Shapeways if you want to give me money 😋 http://shpws.me/QqR5
(I only get $10 from that, the rest is shapeways charge to print it)

I'll measure the location of the motor mounting holes on my machine tomorrow in case there was any variation in where they put them between years or between the black/gold and embossed models.

I'll post pictures and explain how I modified the crank to work with the handwheel.

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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #2 
Having seen this machine in person I can say that a very nice job was done.

Cari

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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #3 
The bottom of the motor mounting holes are 1-7/8" up from the bed, the left side of the left hole is 11/16" from the side of the pillar, and from left side to left side of the holes is 1-7/8"

The bracket works with the original motor mounting screws, but the screw holes in mine broke so I replaced them with longer screws with washers. The screws are size 12-24
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smokeythecat

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Here's the bracket from all the sides

The crank attaches by a screw and nut through its usual mounting hole, but reversed. For some reason, I couldn't get my screw tight enough to stop the crank from pivoting and coming out of alignment, so I glued it to the bracket with epoxy.

It stops where it does, and therefore has to be at an angle, to keep from interfering with the bobbin winder and the screw below it


I had to modify the crank to fit on the White's larger sized handwheel with its further back spokes. I ground down about half the thickness of the part under the wheel, and I had to extend the the finger that goes between the spokes. I used a piece of the handle of an old seam ripper and drilled a hole through it and the crank finger, then attached it with a screw and nut. If I were to do it again, I'd probably just epoxy it on there.

I painted my crank and bracket with wrinkle spray paint to match the machine. It's available at auto parts stores, and it's a pain in the ass to get the coats right on such a weird shaped object.

I removed the spring type piece in the hinge of the crank finger that lets it be engaged or disengaged easily, and filled the hinge with epoxy to keep it at the right angle. I did also sand down a part of the stop motion tab to allow it to open farther and bent its spring to work better in that position, because it was getting caught on the crank and not allowing the wheel to be disengaged for winding bobbins. I chose to make it open farther instead of just making the tab smaller so it would still be a good shape to grab.


Because the handwheel's spokes are so far apart, the blue plastic piece was hitting back and forth on them when I started and stopped cranking, so I split it down the middle and lit it on fire and bent it into a forked shape.


I covered the screw and nut with epoxy to make sure they could never come undone, then spray painted it black and wrapped the fork in black felt. I realized at that point that the epoxy was too thick and hit the stop motion tab, so I had to sand some off and haven't gotten around to re-painting that part.


Here's the fork holding on to one of the spokes


This is the crank and bracket in its final form from the back.

I hot glued felt to the part that contacts the machine to hopefully avoid paint damage. It also helped with some small corrections to the angle. I also rewired the light and ran its cord behind the bracket like how it went behind the motor originally. Because the original motor screws were so short, the plastic they went through had to be thin, causing it to break. I replaced them with longer screws and washers (mine were obviously too big)

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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #5 
On my computer all the vertical pictures are sideways, but on my phone they're right side up ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #6 
Nice!!! Very good explanations.
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smokeythecat

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I am in no way offended if anybody chooses to print the file themselves instead of paying shapeways entirely too much for it, especially with how many steps went into this. I released it into the wild of the internet so other people can do with it whatever they want. The shapeways link is only there because people were asking if they could buy one and I don't have access to a 3d printer anymore. I might print a few in the future and sell them, but that's probably a ways off.
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ColoradoJim

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Reply with quote  #8 
Will this work with the older White Family Rotary machines? I just won a model from 1913 and not sure if it has a motor mount but if it does I want to convert it to a handcrank. Just wondering about the location of the motor mount holes especially with the bulge at the bottom of the base. I can of course make a model in wood with the same basic idea as yours if the mount holes are in different locations as a trial test.
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #9 
Is this a spoked wheel from a Family Rotary installed on a later electric rotary correct?  

Best regards,
Mike
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #10 
Mike, the machine pictured is the same model as my 1929 White - a model 1X. The model 31 looks the same ,but has a different shape to the hand hole cover and a more rounded "rump" and slightly different decoration. These were, I believe, the last model White Family Rotaries to have the spoked hand wheel. 

The White 1X is the first antique sewing machine my wife and I got. We got it in April, 1978 for a joint anniversary present for our second wedding anniversary. We had it for decades before we got a manual for it and found out what we were doing wrong with it, and then I fell in love with it. Very nice machine to sew on. 

Take note that this conversion will require hand cranking backwards, not forwards since it uses a Singer hand crank. 

-Bruce
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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ke6cvh
Is this a spoked wheel from a Family Rotary installed on a later electric rotary correct?  

Best regards,
Mike

Nope, the electric family rotaries (of this age anyway, not sure how many sub models there were) had spoked wheels too, but they don’t have a pulley for a treadle belt
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