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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #1 
I'm sure many of you have the same issue as I'm having - way too many vintage rufflers.
Over the years they just keep accumulating.  I have at least 10 extra ones - low shank Singer.

Any suggestions on what to do with these?  They have vintage screws and springs that maybe could be useful.  If I donate them I'm not sure many folks will know what they are and it would be a shame for them to go in the recycling bin.

I think they are a worthwhile mechanical study at the least.

As an attachment it is useful but one only needs a few.
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macybaby

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Reply with quote  #2 
It's fun to really look them over and compare the differences in design as improvements where made.   It's also neat to compare the Greist with the Singer ones after they split. 

You don't mention what machines yours fit.  Sometimes that can be the hardest part in selling them,  unless you have short shank side clamp ones (Singer type).  

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #3 
Well, all of my extras are the short shank side clamp type.  I think I'll just make something with each one and then sell the item with the ruffler - this shows that it is working and what it can do - especially nice are the pleats which folks sometime overlook.
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #4 
I think that is a fantastic idea. I know I have a few, but some are bent. Maybe someday ir/when I downsize, I will be able to include with the machine.

Janey

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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #5 
I have lots of rufflers but the attachment I seem to have the most of are zipper feet. I'm trying to have a complete set of fiddly bits for all of my Brother machines so I've bought many Brother rufflers in the tiny tin. My problem is, Brother made rufflers #1, #2, and #3, but all I've ever managed to find is #1.

Cari

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swyper501

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Reply with quote  #6 
I have extra low shank rufflers, and one high shank center-needle ruffler that is extra because my high shank machine is left needle. I haven't found a left needle high shank ruffler because they are not described very well in most listings.  (Same with buttonhole attachment.)  I did not know vintage Brother-made attachments existed - I thought they were all Greist or Singer.

Sharon Wyper
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #7 
I pick up a lot of rufflers for pocket change at various charity thrift stores and put them in my sewing machine junk box. Every so often, I find one that is oddball and set it aside. One of them turned out to fit my Necchi Supernova Automatica, one fit my Home Mark Japanese left needle high shank machine. You just never know what those odd rufflers will fit. 

I was not so lucky when I found my Brother ruffler in the original metal box with instructions. There was a fight for it on eBay, but I won. Murphy's law says I will no doubt find one later for a quarter like I did my Necchi. 

-Bruce
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ellellbee

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Reply with quote  #8 
Does anyone know if the screws are common to any on the machines themselves? Since Singer (smart businessman) created a proprietary thread size on all their screws, it would be good to have spares. Wish there were set screws on them. 

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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonesHand52

I was not so lucky when I found my Brother ruffler in the original metal box with instructions. There was a fight for it on eBay, but I won. Murphy's law says I will no doubt find one later for a quarter like I did my Necchi. 

-Bruce

Brother fiddly bits are easy to find on Ebay, rufflers show up all the time. I hope you didn't have to pay an arm and a leg for yours, I have at least a dozen of them and most were less than $10.

Cari

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #10 
It wasn't that much, but there was interest in it. At the time I found mine, there were none to be had on eBay in original box with instructions, and one to match my attachment box for the vintage of my machine, a Brother 210 Selectomatic, late 50s or early 60s. Also none on the other usual sites. 

But, usually the "rare" machines always show up in droves after you already found yours, ones selling for big bucks on eBay and Etsy or Bonanza wind up being picked up at yard sales and Craigslist for pocket change. It's just the way it is. If I pay 40 dollars for a machine, one will show up the next week for ten, often when I thought the 40 dollar one was a steal and could not find one for 5 years.

You have to be in the right place at the right time. Also, there are vintage years to try to match. Some accessories are dime a dozen, but ones that are correct for early models might be rare as hen's teeth. 

It's rather like the great 1950s Singer 99K that I sold to a friend for 25 dollars. Beautiful machine, but I had to put a new power cord, belt and bobbin winder tire on it, plus did all the cleanup. Still, 25 was good - I got it for free. 

- Bruce
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #11 
Most Brother rufflers come in a red tin that matches one of the red fiddly bits boxes (there are two of these). I *think* I also have one in a black tin that matches the black fiddly bits box. Most of my 40+ Brother machines are from the 50s and early 60s so in the same time frame as your 210. I think I have 3 or 4 210s in different colors.

Cari

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #12 
We have 3 Brother vintage machines here. My wife's 210 is sky blue and cream with original case. My green and cream 210 has a custom case I made for it. Our earlier 100 Super Selectomatic (end loader) is the really cool charcoal metallic and salmon pink that I rebuilt the base for and made a new top. Fun machines! 

-Bruce DSC00023 - Copy.jpg  1. Brother home made case.jpg  2. Brother home made case detail.jpg  4. Late 1950s Brother 210 Selectomatic - home made case.jpg  5. Brother home made case - electric socket insert.jpg  2. Brother 100 front.jpg  13. Home made case top, rebuilt base 1.jpg

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #13 
That case you made Bruce is amazing.  It looks like it is brand new OEM which is the ultimate sign of workmanship.  I like those Brother machines but don't own a domestic Brother (we have an industrial Brother serger/overlock MA4).  What I like is the heavy duty JA type class 15 combined with the built in stitches but most importantly I like the external motors on them.  Sometimes I worry about the Kenmore machines we have that some day the replacement internal motor supply will dry up.  Those Brother machines are a different story as they could be replaced and or powered by treadle belt in absence of a motor.  Best regards, Mike
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #14 
On the Singer proprietary screws mentioned.  Miller is the one who keyed me in on the reasoning behind them.  The S.A.E., Society for Automotive Engineers, was created in 1905 which was the beginning of standardization of screw sizes.  Prior to 1905 there was no standardization for American sizes.  The ISO, set up in 1947 for International Organization of Standards according to Wikipedia had the metric screw sizes agreed upon as one of their first agreements.  So, prior to all this it was a free for all and since Singer had likely pretty much set up their machines and attachments with internally standardized screws why change it?  It seems the White FR's which are so great are standardized using SAE.  Probably everyone already knows this but just mentioning it after Miller told me this.  What I found interesting learning from ISMACS site is the Weed sewing machine factory had set up an automatic turret lathe with "brain wheels" that Spencer devised.  All courtesy of the talented engineers that had worked for big gun makers like Colt that left to go to companies like Weed.  regards, Mike

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonesHand52
We have 3 Brother vintage machines here. My wife's 210 is sky blue and cream with original case. My green and cream 210 has a custom case I made for it. Our earlier 100 Super Selectomatic (end loader) is the really cool charcoal metallic and salmon pink that I rebuilt the base for and made a new top. Fun machines! 

-Bruce


Your Brother machines are beautiful!  And the cases are meticulous.  They are really fun to look at and I'm sure even funner to sew with.  I'm very impressed with the craftsmanship on the cases.

 I can understand why one would want attachments specific for each machine when you have such a fine collection in pristine order.  And even the attachment cases to be accurate!

At some point I'll post my collection but likely very boring by the standards here - although I do try to spiff them up along with the tables.  Probably my most interesting and rarer machine is my Singer 421G followed by a nice Singer 12 hand crank with reasonable decals.  And my recent Singer 101 is special.

I have some fairly rare Singer attachments - a fagoter and a single thread embroidery attachment (all in a drawer in a $50 cabinet + machine).  And a nice pinker attachment which I frequently use.
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ke6cvh
On the Singer proprietary screws mentioned.  Miller is the one who keyed me in on the reasoning behind them.  The S.A.E., Society for Automotive Engineers, was created in 1905 which was the beginning of standardization of screw sizes.  Prior to 1905 there was no standardization for American sizes.  The ISO, set up in 1947 for International Organization of Standards according to Wikipedia had the metric screw sizes agreed upon as one of their first agreements.  So, prior to all this it was a free for all and since Singer had likely pretty much set up their machines and attachments with internally standardized screws why change it?  It seems the White FR's which are so great are standardized using SAE.  Probably everyone already knows this but just mentioning it after Miller told me this.  What I found interesting learning from ISMACS site is the Weed sewing machine factory had set up an automatic turret lathe with "brain wheels" that Spencer devised.  All courtesy of the talented engineers that had worked for big gun makers like Colt that left to go to companies like Weed.  regards, Mike

I have been wondering about these screw types and the standardization - this is good information to have - thanks so much for sharing.  Do you know if the German and Italians had any standards prior to ISO?
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #17 
Bruce, Wow, those cases!
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #18 
Hi Chaly and group,  From a google search there was a Whitworth standard in Britain in the 1800's that also branched into a fine thread.  The Germans had a standard in 1919 that is similar to the accepted international metric standard.  Wikipedia shows several different screw thread types.  I could not find a specific Italian standard.  Best regards, Mike
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #19 
Hello again,  After more searching can't help but note that William Sellers in the below web page is described to have come from a family of "mechanicians".  His grandfather made the currency plates for the continental congress while he insisted and was the father of machinery gray standardized paint (I love machinery gray paint) so one can see mechanisms.  His standard became the "Franklin, Seller's, and American Standard thread).  His threads differed from Whitworths mainly because the tops and bottoms (crests and roots) were flattened and it mentioned the flattened roots were a bad choice.  Link below: Best regards, Mike
https://www.sizes.com/tools/thread_history.htm
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #20 
Wow Bruce, I love the work you've done on the cases. Just beautiful, well done.

Cari

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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #21 
Great looking Brothers! 
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