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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #1 
I'm a garment sewer and this is how I got into vintage machines - because for me and the type of sewing I do they just perform best to my expectations.

I do lots of precision work such as shirts - and making professional buttonholes is big on my list.  Nothing I've used has surpassed the Singer vintage buttonhole attachment - you can adjust not only length, but stitch width and buttonhole width. 

Achieving a very narrow stitch width using fine thread is the ultimate in a professional buttonhole for a couture/custom level shirt - for either men or woman. The only thing I could not do is make the cut first and then do the buttonhole. In industry they have special machines that can do this and the result is a buttonhole with very smooth edges and no fraying of either the cloth or the stitches - if you've made buttonholes you know what I'm referring when they look ragged.

Of course I use Fray Check and a buttonhole cutter, etc. but still I didn't think my result matched those made by machines that make the buttonhole after the cut.  I did try to use my attachment after I cut the buttonhole but I could never get the alignment right.

Today I made a mistake - I was working on a small project to get more experience with quilting - I was making small quilted cases that button.  I accidentally cut through the edge of a completed buttonhole.  When I attempted to repair it by sewing over it again using the attachment - the result came out beautiful!

So for the remainder of my cases, I used the attachment to go around just once; then I removed the work from the machine and cut the buttonhole.  Next,I  aligned my work back into the attachment at the starting point and pulled ever so slightly to open the buttonhole.  I sewed around twice.

The result is a buttonhole with very smooth bound-like inside edges. No thread or fabric ragged edges.  I think the stability of going around once and then cutting helps with the alignment.  I did this four times and every time it worked out great.  So now I have a new technique for my shirt sewing.

Many folks get vintage machines just for doing their buttonholes and now I know that one can at least match if not surpass the best machine buttonholes that are possible - to an industry standard.

I've tried taking some pictures to illustrate - buttonhole, open, and with button.  
buttonhole.jpg  buttonhole open.jpg  buttonholebutton.jpg 

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Katrene

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Reply with quote  #2 
Chaly, Thank you!  Maybe I'll get that button hole attachment out and give button holes another try.  Mine were sooo raggedy years ago I finally gave up.. Thanks again for the new technique😉

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #3 
Very nice, Thanks for the "how to"

I still need to try the older BH attachments that don't take the templates.

Janey


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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OurWorkbench
Very nice, Thanks for the "how to"

I still need to try the older BH attachments that don't take the templates.

Janey



The older ones without the templates are superior because you can vary the length in gradations, spacing of stitches, bight (width of stitch) and cutting space.  The templated attachment allows only predetermined sizes (templates), cutting space, and spacing of stitches.  The one advantage the templated attachment has is the eyelet template which is not possible on the older one.  Also - the older attachment is not available for the slant machines from my awareness.

For a long time I didn't even try my older attachment and just used my templated ones - and they are fine for most uses where you don't need an odd size or don't need to adjust the bight.  But adjusting the bight gives such better results when you need a very fine buttonhole.  

When I have some time I'll take some photos of the different results achieved from each attachment.  I highly recommend trying an older attachment if you have one.
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #5 
Oh - one more important difference - the templated attachment does keyhole buttonholes while the older one does not.
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #6 
Don't you love it when a mistake becomes a "a ha" moment!  What a genius discovery.  Must remember this one.
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #7 
I wonder if there is a way to slit it without removing it?
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miriam
I wonder if there is a way to slit it without removing it?


This may be possible with the seam ripper method if the fabric is thinner.  For me, taking out and realigning would be easier than trying to cut while in the attachment.  

I think one of the reasons I was not successful when I cut first was it was hard to align correctly with just the cut.  When one stitches around once you have the stitching to help with aligning and this is actually pretty easy.

I'll play around with this some more the next time I'm doing some buttonholes and will try your idea.
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Deb

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks so much for this tip. I just got a couple new patterns I'd like to try...now all I need to do is find one of the old style attachments.
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BarefootLizzie

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Reply with quote  #10 
Great discovery! Thanks for sharing, will have to give this a go 🙂
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jennasquiltn

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Reply with quote  #11 
I really like my button hole attachment, it is the template style...didn't realize there was one w/out.  Would you post a picture of yours?  I'm curious how you managed to get the hole lined back up correctly.  I see myself having a crazy looking button hole because I was off by an eighth of an inch or something, lol.  Also, I thought the template kind were adjustable on the bite?  Isn't that what the lever on the side is for?  I always go around my button holes twice.  Oh, I have wondered about using a heat tool to singe the edges of the button hole?  I haven't tried it, but in machine embroidery you can use a tool like a wood burning tool to singe the edges of "in the hoop" designs so you don't have all the raggedy edges.  Maybe that would work w/button holes too.

Your button holes look great, thanks for sharing.
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #12 
I collect a lot of attachments to go with my sewing machine collection, some of which are a variety of buttonholers. I like to have one for each machine name, too. Pfaff, Free-Westinghouse, White, Kenmore, Singer, you name it. Zigzag attachments too, especially the decorative ones. 

Often when I sew, I keep my Singer 15CH hand crank machine set up with a Singer low shank buttonholer (50s green plastic case, black beetle body, made by Greist). It keeps the work flowing without having to set up the machine I'm sewing on for buttonholes (I never liked the built-in buttonholers with the bar-tack ends). It just takes too long and no point in doing it if I can have a separate machine set up for it. 

That said, I am re-thinking using them at all for the finished buttonhole. Too many times I have made a garment, especially jackets, where the finished buttonhole looks like hell down the road because the household thread used for making it on the machine simply wears out. Household thread is not buttonhole thread, and many machines will not allow buttonhole thread to be used, especially when using a buttonholer or zigzag stitch. 

I wind up having to go over the buttonhole again by hand, and with a dual pass of the buttonholer and household thread, it makes for a thick, ugly buttonhole. So, I will do my next garment using a buttonholer to secure and mark the buttonhole - one pass only - then cut the buttonhole and finish it by using needle and buttonhole thread with a proper buttonhole stitch. Yes, it takes longer, but there is an old boat builder's adage, "The longest road is the shortest way home."

For shirts, the household thread seems to last ok, since I have never had the problem I have had with heavy material like wool or denim. 

-Bruce


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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennasquiltn
I really like my button hole attachment, it is the template style...didn't realize there was one w/out.  Would you post a picture of yours?  I'm curious how you managed to get the hole lined back up correctly.  I see myself having a crazy looking button hole because I was off by an eighth of an inch or something, lol.  Also, I thought the template kind were adjustable on the bite?  Isn't that what the lever on the side is for?  I always go around my button holes twice.  Oh, I have wondered about using a heat tool to singe the edges of the button hole?  I haven't tried it, but in machine embroidery you can use a tool like a wood burning tool to singe the edges of "in the hoop" designs so you don't have all the raggedy edges.  Maybe that would work w/button holes too.

Your button holes look great, thanks for sharing.


You are correct - the templated buttonholer does have a bight adjustment - it is just not as flexible at the older (No. 12175) buttonholer.  I don't have any problems lining it back up but I've had lots of practice with these older attachments.  You just have to see where the needle is going and if it is slightly off just readjust your fabric slightly.  Also go slow.

I have samples I did today: fine cotton shirting with silk organza interfacing, size 50 wt. silk thread, size 11 vintage singer needle, top thread tension a bit tighter than for normal sewing, 5/8" template, Singer 201 with feed dogs lowered.

I compared the templated buttonholer with the older one.  In addition to the older one have a bit more flexibility - to me the stitches look a bit more even - especially after just one pass.

The first photo below shows the templated buttonholes - the top one is cut - see the ragged edges.  The two top ones are #3 bight, middle is #1 bight, last two #6 bight.  This is the full range.

The second photo shows the buttonholes on the older attachment - see the buttonhole width AND bight variations and evenness of stitches. Notice you can get a narrower bight.

The last photo of buttonholes shows completed buttonholes using my method of sewing once, cutting, and then sewing twice around.  Notice the smooth bound interior edges.

Hope this helps.  Just practice and you will get the hang of it.  (Also, have not heard of heat treatment - maybe this would work for synthetics but I don't sew frequently with synthetic fabric or thread).

templated buttonholes.jpg  buttonholes.jpg  bhcomplete.jpg 
thread.jpg  bhattachment.jpg

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonesHand52
I collect a lot of attachments to go with my sewing machine collection, some of which are a variety of buttonholers. I like to have one for each machine name, too. Pfaff, Free-Westinghouse, White, Kenmore, Singer, you name it. Zigzag attachments too, especially the decorative ones. 

Often when I sew, I keep my Singer 15CH hand crank machine set up with a Singer low shank buttonholer (50s green plastic case, black beetle body, made by Greist). It keeps the work flowing without having to set up the machine I'm sewing on for buttonholes (I never liked the built-in buttonholers with the bar-tack ends). It just takes too long and no point in doing it if I can have a separate machine set up for it. 

That said, I am re-thinking using them at all for the finished buttonhole. Too many times I have made a garment, especially jackets, where the finished buttonhole looks like hell down the road because the household thread used for making it on the machine simply wears out. Household thread is not buttonhole thread, and many machines will not allow buttonhole thread to be used, especially when using a buttonholer or zigzag stitch. 

I wind up having to go over the buttonhole again by hand, and with a dual pass of the buttonholer and household thread, it makes for a thick, ugly buttonhole. So, I will do my next garment using a buttonholer to secure and mark the buttonhole - one pass only - then cut the buttonhole and finish it by using needle and buttonhole thread with a proper buttonhole stitch. Yes, it takes longer, but there is an old boat builder's adage, "The longest road is the shortest way home."

For shirts, the household thread seems to last ok, since I have never had the problem I have had with heavy material like wool or denim. 

-Bruce



Bruce,

I've experienced all your frustrations!  For heavy wool or jackets I either make bound buttonholes or hand buttonholes using silk buttonhole twist thread.

But the majority of my sewing has buttonholes in lightweight fabrics.  After examining high-end ready to wear and doing some research I think the trick is to use a very fine silk thread and a narrow bight adjustment.  I think even for jeans, using a good silk or strong polyester thread and going around three times like I do should help with the wear.

With my method of using an attachment to sew after the cut the buttonhole should have some good wear.  Even with hand sewing - the thread is the key.  You are lucky you can do hand stitched buttonholes as this is a real talent.  Mine are getting better but I need more practice.

In general, I think the vintage attachments do take a bit of practice but once one gets them working I think they perform wonderfully.  In the meantime though, the learning curve can be frustrating.  For example, my hemstitcher attachment and narrow hemmer - at first I thought I would never master them and now it's a breeze.
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #15 
Doing hand buttonholes does take a bit of practice to look professional, but any sewing does. As far as wool goes, I made a Winter coat that I used cotton duck on the outside and put a wool lining in, but when it came time to make the buttonholes, I used some scrap material and tried them out using a buttonholer and decided, like you found, that bound buttonholes were the way to go. I have made bound buttonholes in a couple of garments, starting with a 1920s dress (original Butterick pattern) that I did for one of our display mannequins using nothing but a 1929 White model 1X rotary electric and hand sewing - no zigzag, no buttonholer and raw edges were whip stitched by hand. I wanted something simple and authentic for that one. 

My coat came out good and the bound buttonholes are still solid and firm. Later I got a Singer Professional Buttonholer that has the templates for bound buttonholes. Those templates insert from the top on this model. 

As for old and new type buttonholers, Singer had the old type with no cam inserts and the later Greist model with cam inserts, but also the Famous type buttonholer and even earlier than those was the model 1887 Peerless Buttonholer that was totally adjusted by screws and knobs. I have several of these, with the slide plates cut to fit my Singer VS 2. They will also fit the later 27s and 28s. 

- Bruce

1. Peerless buttonholer group 1.jpg  2. Peerless buttonholder group 2.jpg  3. Peerless buttonholer right side.jpg  4. Peerless buttonholer left side.jpg  5. Peerless buttonholer top.jpg  Peerless Buttonhole Attachment instructions 1.jpg  Peerless Buttonhole Attachment instructions 2.jpg  Famous Buttonholer Brochure 1.jpg  Famous Buttonholer Brochure 2.jpg  Famous Buttonholer Instructions 1.jpg  Famous Buttonholer Instructions 2.jpg 

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #16 
Hello group,

  We have Reece 104's here and a Juki buttonholer machine with a Juki button sewing machine.  They are all underused as we continue to build and set up things.  However, I have a 201k hand crank with a Singer button hole attachment that is pretty much dedicated for the job of sewing eyelets.  We did some experimentation on our 401a and Kenmore 158.1914 (but can't remember honestly which machines were all tried besides those two and a White 77mg).  We ended up with the 201k which surprised me as it handled the thickest thread compared to the 401a.  I'm not sure why the 401a didn't like it's button hole attachment with thicker thread but I was dis appointed after having bought one specifically for it.  After  the 201k was found to work so well hand cranking eyelets I just settled on that.  We also experimented with multiple passes on button holes here including the 2nd pass after cutting.  On our Reece 104's they both have different personalities.  What I have found works well is to take a single layer of synthetic color black felt and back the denim with it before performing the operation.  This is extra work but it really increases the reliability of the successful buttonhole operation and I just trim it afterwards.  It seems to cut better as well as adding a little bulk the the area of the keyhole.  I've tried the white colored backing used for patches and it just did not work as well as the felt for me.  Nothing worse than attaching a waistband to only have a failed keyhole.  Best regards, Mike
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #17 
Bruce - I enjoyed seeing your collection of buttonhole attachments - and especially the manuals.  These attachments and how they work are mechanical wonders to me and fun to use.

I was looking at my manual for my templated attachment and decided to try to make a keyhole following the instructions to mimic a hand sewn buttonhole (wide bight followed by narrow).  I used a lightweight linen and everything else the same as before.  My photo shows an uncut example.  Now I just need to play around and see if I can do this after cutting - I'm thinking I will need some sort of stabilizer.

keyhole.jpg 

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ke6cvh
Hello group,

  We have Reece 104's here and a Juki buttonholer machine with a Juki button sewing machine.  They are all underused as we continue to build and set up things.  However, I have a 201k hand crank with a Singer button hole attachment that is pretty much dedicated for the job of sewing eyelets.  We did some experimentation on our 401a and Kenmore 158.1914 (but can't remember honestly which machines were all tried besides those two and a White 77mg).  We ended up with the 201k which surprised me as it handled the thickest thread compared to the 401a.  I'm not sure why the 401a didn't like it's button hole attachment with thicker thread but I was dis appointed after having bought one specifically for it.  After  the 201k was found to work so well hand cranking eyelets I just settled on that.  We also experimented with multiple passes on button holes here including the 2nd pass after cutting.  On our Reece 104's they both have different personalities.  What I have found works well is to take a single layer of synthetic color black felt and back the denim with it before performing the operation.  This is extra work but it really increases the reliability of the successful buttonhole operation and I just trim it afterwards.  It seems to cut better as well as adding a little bulk the the area of the keyhole.  I've tried the white colored backing used for patches and it just did not work as well as the felt for me.  Nothing worse than attaching a waistband to only have a failed keyhole.  Best regards, Mike


I'm of the same opinion - I prefer my 201 over 401 for buttonholes - even though the attachment is similar.  I have both the templated and prof buttonholer for my slant machines.ll

I have not done many eyelets - what are their functions for your sewing?  And how do you cut them?  I'd like to know the best way to cut the keyholes and it may be similar to your eyelet cutting.  

I'm going to experiment with different stabilizers for making the buttonhole after the cut.  The tear away type may work well.  This may have the same function as your felt.
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #19 
Hi Chaly,

  That looks great on your button hole sample...really good looking keyhole.  eBay sells tiny kits for cutting out the button hole.  Likely same can be had from Amazon or other online sources sub 10 dollars.  It is a couple inch square piece of self healing matting like the ones for rotary cutters, a straight cutter, and a small round cutter.  I've bought them before and when new and keeping corrosion off them they are very sharp.  I bet with the round/straight cutter kit you could follow the 2nd narrow bite and get a really incredible buttonhole/keyhole.  I tried different stabilizers (mentioned on last post) and for denim decided the synthetic felt worked best on our Reece 104.

Best regards,
Mike
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #20 
Hi Chaly, 

  Cutter kit already mentioned in last post easily had online and work great.  I use eyelets for the bottom of pockets in canvas packs and cargo pockets sometimes.  They provide drainage if a pocket is swamped with water.  More of a rugged/outdoors application.  One could just as easily use a brass eyelet but why when they are just as good in my opinion off a button hole attachment.  I think the intended purpose of an eyelet is for allowing someone to lace something up with string or "small stuff" rope.

Best regards,
Mike
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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #21 
So you're basically overcasting the circumference of the buttonhole after you cut it? Am I understanding this correctly?

Sounds like a real "brainwave" - it makes sense to me!

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jennasquiltn

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Reply with quote  #22 
Chaly thank you for showing those pictures.  I don't guess I have ever seen that older style attachment.  And, thank you for the button hole pictures, the ones from the older attachment do look nice.
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #23 
So you're basically overcasting the circumference of the buttonhole after you cut it? Am I understanding this correctly?

Yup - you got it!
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ke6cvh
Hi Chaly, 

  Cutter kit already mentioned in last post easily had online and work great.  I use eyelets for the bottom of pockets in canvas packs and cargo pockets sometimes.  They provide drainage if a pocket is swamped with water.  More of a rugged/outdoors application.  One could just as easily use a brass eyelet but why when they are just as good in my opinion off a button hole attachment.  I think the intended purpose of an eyelet is for allowing someone to lace something up with string or "small stuff" rope.

Best regards,
Mike

Mike - thanks for the info.  I looked in my supplies and I did have a sort of punch with one of my buttonhole cutters.  So I used this along with a tear away stabilizer on a keyhole to cut after the first round and then finish up.  It worked great.  For me the stabilizer made it easier for the narrow bight.  This will definitely be my go to method for making buttonholes - for both of my attachments.
stabilizer.jpg  kh back.jpg  kh cut.jpg  kh open.jpg 

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #25 
Hi group,

  Your work looks great!

  I think the weak point of a keyhole on a button hole attachment is the ends where the stitching is not perpindicular.  One could always zig zag a little re enforcement at each end which would no longer be looking like a button hole we are used to seeing but likely be much stronger.  I guess another option if one went slow enough on the 2nd pass might be to try to insert a piece of cord as it goes around.  If that was done then likely no need to re enforce the ends any more either.  They make special "gimp" cord for hand sewing button holes traditionally.  Our Reece 104's have a gimp cord as it sews the keyhole.  We are using a ticket 20 for the gimp cord but might be able to go heavier.  

  What I tried experimenting with a while back was to use our Kenmore 158.1914 for the initial keyhole and then tried hand sewing the second pass with a gimp.  That was a while back and hand sewing like that takes high skill levels and patience.  Not so pretty as I needed practice.


Best regards,
Mike
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johnstuart

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Reply with quote  #26 
Has anyone got a buttonhole machine that does eyelets? I know 3 people who would love to know one that does.

I have the 1884 peerless just not the box or bobbin plate cover. I have the attachment in a gutted out Singer puzzle box and hope to place a lock in for it at sometime. I have the cutter from a 1884 IF machine i got. Wish it had the rest at the time when i found it lol.

I have the Famous brand too, love how they both work.

  John Stuart
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #27 
The Greist-made buttonholers had an eyelet cam. The basic set came with 5 buttonhole cams - one in the unit, 4 in holders in the box. An extra cam set of 4 other sizes came as a separate purchase in a slip case. 

What is not commonly known is a separate, single cam for eyelets was also sold. I have a couple of these. One has the original box (put away with a buttonholer) and this one keep in my rare items compartment in a roll around sewing cabinet I made. It's easily identifiable by the hole in the casting in stead of being marked with a size or name like the other Greist-made cams. 

-Bruce Buttonholer eyelet cam.jpg 

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johnstuart

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Reply with quote  #28 
Thank you Mike, I looked on ebay and they are a bit rare. I saw only one out  of 58 items that looked like it might have an eyelet insert.

  John Stuart
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #29 
Since I had my machine setup for buttonholes I thought I'd make some eyelets to share.  These were done with a Singer eyelet cam with my vintage singer cam required buttonholer (the one in the green snap box). 

My Singer Professional Buttonholer for my slant machines has an eyelet cam that is plastic - see photo.

I can't remember where, but I thought I heard the eyelet cams now have modern replacements to fit the vintage buttonholers.  

Lucky for those who have a dedicated buttonhole professional machine!  And this discussion has been great info for me to hear about what others are doing.  Anyone have any pictures to share - especially those who are using a dedicated pro machine?

Picture, L-R, bight 1; bight 3, bight 6

eyelets.jpg 


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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #30 
Wow,  I had to look at an eyelet to compare on a backpack pocket (waxed canvas) .....mine are oblong but perfectly shaped done on a 201k with a vintage button hole attachment and metal cam.  I took down the setup to allow my daughter to use the hand crank but I'm fairly certain we were using ticket 50 in the bobbin and ticket 50 or ticket 30 in the needle.  I wonder why the difference in eyelets. Did you have any backing?

Best regards,
Mike
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #31 
Mike,

No backing.  The eyelet centers are all oval but depending on the bight adjustment the outside shape changes.  The narrowest bight (1) has the most oval shape and the widest bight (6) has a more round shape.
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #32 
Since we are on the subject of buttonholes, there are various ways to cut the buttonhole. The Peerless Buttonholer of 1887 that I submitted photos of earlier uses a chisel. Pfaff has a pair of thin chisel points and a metal handle in their attachment sets for the Pfaff 130 and 230 (for example) but here is one patented in 1872. Some of the makers in the late 1860s and early 1870s were already making buttonhole making attachments for their machines - Domestic had one listed in their advertising for example. 

This is a simple one and was in with a bunch of attachments I got for a Domestic fiddle/shield base machine, late 1870s or 1880s.  1872 WW Egnew patent buttonhole cutter 1.jpg  1872 WW Egnew patent buttonhole cutter 2.jpg  1872 WW Egnew patent buttonhole cutter 3.jpg 

- Bruce

 
Attached Files
pdf 1872 buttonhole gauge and cutter.pdf (52.75 KB, 15 views)

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johnstuart

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Reply with quote  #33 
That is the oldest button hole cutter i have seen Bruce!!! Never knew it existed, thank you for sharing. Know i know what to look for when i am out and about browsing.

  John Stuart
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #34 
Very clever cutter and with it's own patent!  It's fun to see these tools.

I did find a new eyelet template for the vintage Singer attachment that takes cams.  
It's sold by The Featherweight Shop and its current price is $9.71.
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #35 
Just a couple of thoughts about the eyelet template. I'm glad someone 3D printed the eyelet cam. The Greist extra templates had the eyelet one. In the late 1970's or early 1980s, I got the extra set for a Kenmore buttonholer, which had the eyelet. I also found it in the 1960 Sears catalog that I got on VSS, but can't find it now. It says that it can be used for belt eyelets. I remember that many dresses from the 1950s had self fabric belts. There have been some belt buckles and stiffener in with a lot of sewing stuff that I have gotten and have seen many times.

I remember my mother made me a drawstring bag to match an outfit that she had made me. Rather than a casing, it had eyelets to thread the drawstring through.

Chaly, does the 6 bite fit on a spool pin? I was thinking that it was a little smaller.

Janey


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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #36 
I have a Martha Stewart screw punch that I have used to make the hole in felt for spool pin felts. I also wonder if you could use something like the one shown at https://www.victoriansweatshop.com/post/singer-tns-9856562 (It is called Tailor Tacker And Pattern Perforator although I think Dritz called it a Pattern Perforator and Tailor Tacker.)
I also seems like the metal eyelets have a tool to cut the fabric before installing the metal eyelet.

Janey

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #37 
Janey,

The diameter on the 6 bight eyelet is approximately 3mm - and yes it fits on a spool - see photo.  It's a snug fit though.

I find the eyelets definitely more of a challenge to cut - so thanks for your suggestions.  My punch is a bit too small  to work the way I would like so I'll have to order a hammer hole punch at a 3mm size if I'm going to pursue making a lot of eyelets.  I can see them being a nice touch for certain applications.
spool.jpg 

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #38 
There is a large assortment of hole sizes for punches used with leather.  I'm sure one will be just right for the eyelet.  They can be found vintage or new. 
If I remember correctly someone used their flower foot to make a design on the bottom of a spool pin.  The flower foot combined with the eyelet and proper sized punch from leather working tools would be very nice! 😉


Best regards, Mike
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ChattyKathy

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Reply with quote  #39 
Reading this thread has gotten me enthused about using this attachment. I have never attempt to use a button hole maker attachment with a VSM. I have numerous ones in boxes. They all seem to be old and cruddy looking. I hesitate to use them till I have them cleaned up and oiled (?). I just feel like my fabric would be ruined if I used them in their current conditions. I presume that they need oiling on any of the hinged type places. Any suggestions of what to use to clean them? They are metal thus water would just cause them to rust.
Thanks,

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #40 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChattyKathy
Reading this thread has gotten me enthused about using this attachment. I have never attempt to use a button hole maker attachment with a VSM. I have numerous ones in boxes. They all seem to be old and cruddy looking. I hesitate to use them till I have them cleaned up and oiled (?). I just feel like my fabric would be ruined if I used them in their current conditions. I presume that they need oiling on any of the hinged type places. Any suggestions of what to use to clean them? They are metal thus water would just cause them to rust.
Thanks,


Lucky you have them and I encourage you to give them a try.  I've just cleaned mine with alcohol and then oil all moving parts (careful of the alcohol around any painted area though - just a damp micro cloth around the painted areas work for me). 
They don't seem to need a lot of oiling - just now and then when I'm oiling my machine I'll put a few drops of oil on moving areas.  I've never had one malfunction but it does take a bit of practice - just keep experimenting with different adjustments, thread, needle, fabric etc and you will find the sweet spot for what you want to achieve.
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #41 
Sorry about being late to the party, but here is what we call "grandma's little shank"
20140827_223918_sm.jpg  20140827_224003_sm.jpg 

Here is my collection of button hole cutters from cheapest to most advance.
20140911_185946_sm.jpg 


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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #42 
Your "grandma's little shank" is actually quite beautiful.
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #43 
Thanks, It was black and green with "patina" when I found it.  One of the Joys of old stuff is that they are frequently made with sufficient quality that they can clean up like this after decades of neglect.
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