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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #51 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgf
BTW, the copyright on the manual is 1923...


Considering the fact that Singer had to photograph what they did, get the copy ready, have it edited and cleared, and then acquire copyright, and then send it to a printer and finally published... you can tell from the first few pages that the process to get this manual together had begun near the model's introduction. It's all quite early... and just entirely fabulous.

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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #52 
Thread drift: Here's a photo of the controller on my 101. This is in the NW corner of the cabinet.

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jpeg IMG_20190308_094503621.jpg (151.57 KB, 23 views)


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pgf

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Reply with quote  #53 
Well, my 101 has now been sitting for another 3 or 4 days with fresh oil, and even a bit of PB Blaster, on all the bearings.  It's still quite stiff, with a lot of stiction as you turn it over.  Some shaft or other is bound up for some reason, I think.  Just need to figure out which.  :-/ 

There are a huge number of "double set screw" joints in this machine -- which usually means there's no flat on the shaft to guarantee realignment.  So I guess I just need to a) mark any gear pairs, so that the teeth don't get out of alignment, and b) mark any shaft alignments, to try and get them back where they were, and c) try and convince myself that anything I take apart and mess up can be fixed via the timing procedure outlined in the adjusters manual.

Any tips from someone who's gone through this, or something similar, would be much appreciated!

paul

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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #54 
Paul

Wish I could help but I've never gotten into one that far. (I shouldn't say this because there's this little Necchi issue I may have to fix.)

I will however post a diagram on the 101-1 wiring because I have figured it out on some of the 40 cabinets, but not on all of them yet. And... now I know why the spring plate had those three teeth in the side for the power cable instead of a hole. It was to hold the power cable in place if you screwed into a light bulb fixture. This also explains why my power cord was eight feet long. What I have yet to figure out is why on earth would I take a light bulb out to screw in my power cord if there wasn't a light available on the machine. That seems somewhat silly. Let's all sew in the dark. Then again...it gives some credence to the idea that the 66 shouldn't have been in this early 40 cabinet. (The 66 doesn't have a light). The 101 always had a Singerlight. My 101 head isn't old enough to have the exact same wiring set-up so I'm going to have to get creative.










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pgf

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Reply with quote  #55 
Jim -- I think answer to the "screw it into a bulb socket" question is that early last century, when houses were first electrified, electric appliances weren't common.  So often the only power in a room might be from the light fixture.  My 1918 Westinghouse came supplied with a screw-in cord -- no plug at all.

But you're right about the inherent contradictions:  here's an ad for my machine which makes me laugh.  The machine is screwed into the wall fixture...  and she's using a table lamp to work with!  Where's that plugged in?!?
   https://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/western_elec_flyer.png.html

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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #56 
Cool ad. But what's a "typewriter"?
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #57 
And I'll bet no one ever stored that machine on the top shelf of a closet.  Mine weighs almost 30lbs without the bonnet.
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #58 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorba
Cool ad. But what's a "typewriter"?


AsingType2.jpg 

Wha? It's a Singer...


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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
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*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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hilltophomesteader

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Reply with quote  #59 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgf
Jim -- I think answer to the "screw it into a bulb socket" question is that early last century, when houses were first electrified, electric appliances weren't common.  So often the only power in a room might be from the light fixture.  My 1918 Westinghouse came supplied with a screw-in cord -- no plug at all.

But you're right about the inherent contradictions:  here's an ad for my machine which makes me laugh.  The machine is screwed into the wall fixture...  and she's using a table lamp to work with!  Where's that plugged in?!?
   https://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/western_elec_flyer.png.html


Not to mention the fact that she is sitting on the wrong side of the desk....and it is apparently magically upheld by just 2 legs!

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #60 
Ohmigosh the drawers!!  I never noticed!  That's a riot.  What were they thinking?
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Threadedchaos

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Reply with quote  #61 
if you start to look for it, you see it all the time. There are situations in reality that don't work from an advertising point. There is no way to show the lady sewing without either having her back to the viewer or the back of the desk with a good view of the machine in operation. neither are desirable for advertising. Therefore you get all kinds of skewed illustrations as they try to show everything they think is important. Some are so off that it achieves the exact opposite of its purpose and makes the viewer think that the seller has a bad product or ignorant of how it works.
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Phyllis1115

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Reply with quote  #62 
Paul-
I'd love a copy for my 101.
Not posting much since I broke my right wrist two weeks after my left wrist.
-Phyllis


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pgf

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Reply with quote  #63 
Ouch!   No wrist for the weary, eh?!?      (Okay.... that was bad.  Heal well!.   Sent you a PM.)

paul

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Phyllis1115

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Reply with quote  #64 
Thanks, Paul.
Yes, it is a pain. Good pun.

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #65 
I've been dutifully adding penetrating oil to the 101 head for a week or two now, and giving it a fe twists now and again in the hopes of it fully freeing up.  It wasn't helping.

With my (somewhat more exciting) Home machine all cleaned up, I had room to put the 101 back up on the bench.  It occurred to me that just giving the machine a twist now and again might not be enough -- maybe it needed some real running.  Its own motor wasn't strong enough for the job, but I realized that the handwheel shaft on the 101 is slender enough that with the stop-motion knob off I could grab the shaft (lightly) with my electric drill, and give the machine a spin.  That worked nicely... but I don't think it accomplished anything.

However, doing all that led me to a discovery:  while reattaching the stop-motion knob, I realized that if the knob was barely tight enough to let the hand wheel turn the machine, that everything spun freely!  Only when I fully tighten the knob does the machine get stiff.  So there's something wrong with the installation of the hand wheel, or the bushings at that end of the shaft, or maybe something else.  In any case, I now know where to look for the problem, which is a way better position to be in than I was before.

paul

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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #66 
paul,

You just reminded me. I have two 101s. The most recent didn't give me any trouble at all, but the first was a train wreck. I believe it still has an extra washer behind the hand wheel. Blame it on years of wear or whatever, but for some strange reason I needed it to be able to lock/unlock for bobbin winding, otherwise, without the washer, it was all just a tad too tight.
It's not a thick washer...

Dang, now I can't remember if the extra washer was behind the hand wheel or just behind the lock knob. 
Try the knob first.


-Jim

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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #67 
I don't have quite the right sized washer, but experiments tell me it likely needs to be behind the hand wheel.

I see the adjuster's manual has the skinny on removing the hand wheel.  I'll wait until I have time to concentrate.  (The manual also says there should be 4 washers on the outside of the hand wheel, installed in a specific order.  I'll check that order when they come out.)

paul

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #68 
Washers were in the right order.  Followed the adjusters manual for R&R of hand wheel -- it says to tighten set screws last, not first -- but still have the problem.
The bushing the hand wheel attaches to has a _lot_ of play in it -- almost a quarter inch, side to side.  I wonder if that's normal.
I also don't understand the manual when it describes how to remove that bushing -- it implies it should just come out, but it also implies there's a collar attached to it.  Confusing.

paul

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #69 
Success!  After putting the hand wheel on and off about a dozen times, I finally rechecked the the stacking order of those keyed washers -- and they were exactly backwards.  Somehow I missed that the first time.  I reversed them. and all was well.

And that's a good thing, because the next step might have been to remove that bushing, and that collar (labeled F2 in the adjuster's manual).  But that's not going to happen easily, because someone cracked off half of the top of one of the set screws in the collar -- there's nothing at all on one side of the slot.  It'll need drilling out if it ever has to come out.

But for now, I think I'm good to go.  Just need to do the rest of the cleanup, grease the motor, replace the wicks, and then...  oh.  Make a base.

paul

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