Victorian Sweatshop Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Beautiful_Sound

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 154
Reply with quote  #1 
Was a bit happy, condition be damned. It's the same age as my treadle 66-1!

Attached Images
jpeg 20170319_120811.jpg (205.62 KB, 64 views)


__________________
Texas

SINGER 66-1,15-91, 201, 221, 401, 403, 603, 604, 620, 750, 771

0
Margaret

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 2,486
Reply with quote  #2 
What good luck!
__________________
Margaret 
Richland, WA
0
macybaby

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,413
Reply with quote  #3 
that is very neat!  Those larger green ones are hard to find!

What is the date/number in the upper left corner of the manual?   I've been putting together a chart of Singer manuals,  and want to add this one to it. 

__________________
CD & SD in SD
0
Beautiful_Sound

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 154
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by macybaby
that is very neat!  Those larger green ones are hard to find!

What is the date/number in the upper left corner of the manual?   I've been putting together a chart of Singer manuals,  and want to add this one to it. 


Form 8056
Revised
June 13, 1913

I took the time to press every page between a cotton undershirt and a low iron, it looks so neat. Old, foxed and torn but still...😀 Not in the above picture. Scanned the manual and of course it is 308 mbs, pdf 300 dpi. So...gonna have to adjust.

__________________
Texas

SINGER 66-1,15-91, 201, 221, 401, 403, 603, 604, 620, 750, 771
0
OurWorkbench

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,212
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beautiful_Sound

... Scanned the manual and of course it is 308 mbs, pdf 300 dpi. So...gonna have to adjust.


Whoa! That is huge. Probably a whole lot better than some of the manuals I've seen/have.

Neat idea to press between fabric!

Janey

__________________
Janey & John
0
Son of A Singer Man

Member
Registered:
Posts: 73
Reply with quote  #6 
HI,

        Regarding Early editions of Singer Green Instruction Books, my 1924 Singer 31-20 came with an oversize 5-1/2" X 8-1?2 " green Singer instruction book, with this information: Form 7829... May 13, 1913 printed in the upper left hand corner of the manual's cover. 

       This machine was purchased new in San Francisco, CA on August 10, 1928 by a spinster seamstress named "Adeline". At the time, she worked as a seamstress in the Custom Drapery Department of "The City of Paris" Department Store in San Francisco. Adeline bought the machine and had it delivered to her home so that she could complete drapery orders during her weekends and on evening hours during the week, whenever necessary.

The woman who sold it to me is Adeline's niece, and she was the one who related the machine's history to me. The seller's elderly mother (Adeline's sister) was also present when I went to buy the machine. It was really troubling her to see the machine being sold, and she was so happy that it was "going to a good home". She told me that her sister Adeline was a very frugal, thrifty person, and that this machine was one of the biggest purchases in her life, basically "it was her pride & joy"! 


      I have the original Bill of Sale from the Singer dealer showing that Adeline bought the machine and it's table as an electric, even though the leg irons and framework were for a treadle machine. The Singer supplier evidently omitted the lower band wheel and pitman from the treadle stand, employing the stand's treadle plate as the on/off switch for the huge, very heavy Singer  Industrial Sewing motor that was hung upside down under the table top.

    A few years later, I was finally able to locate the correct band wheel, and thereby make the machine a 'convertible', allowing it to be switched from treadle operation to electric motor operation and vice-versa taking up very little time in the conversion process.

  The main problem that I ran into in the treadle conversion was that the lower band wheel invaded the area that was already occupied by the under-slung Singer sewing motor. I moved the motor further back toward the read edge of the table top for clearance, but I found that the whole assembly became somewhat unstable, in that the whole thing could flip over backwards with very light upward pressure applied just under the front edge of the table.

   After some months spent mulling the situation over, I came up with a solution: I had a spare, much-smaller 1.5 amp Viking sewing motor, and I managed to create a mounting plate for it, using the horizontal slot in the main body casting that Singer has under the 31-20's hand wheel to attach the Viking motor and its mounting plate. I suspect that Singer used that horizontal slot to mount the machine body in assembly fixtures during the assembly process at the factory. The Viking sewing motor sits and functions just as a normal household sewing machine motor sits, in an adjustable, "outboard mount" fashion just behind the machine's pillar. 





__________________
"Son of A Singer Man" [smile]
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.