Victorian Sweatshop Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Farmer John

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 980
Reply with quote  #1 
Ok, I know that the only thing vintage will be the power supply.  Other than the mfg blurb about this machine, I have not found any detailed information.  So, if there is sufficient interest, I will babble on about construction, fit, and function.  Let me know.
Farmer John100_1098.jpg 

0
Miriam

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,177
Reply with quote  #2 
Go ahead and babble. I know the Amish around here use them.
__________________
Never let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry..
urban Indianapolis
0
redbugsullivan

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 108
Reply with quote  #3 
Please, sir, babble. Recently it has crept back up in my list of things to do. I have one of these that a friend took out of a treadle. Traded machines, in fact. I am wondering how much treadling it will take to loosen it up, per the reviews on Lehman's site. Thanks to a donation, it will go into a "trimmed" treadle that held a Singer 66. With this top, carving on it will not change its value because the ends were cut off and the top used as a backing for occasional drilling.

My questions- How much carving will I have to do to create a set-up where the head can be completely lowered? What are your plans for lighting?

__________________
Annette
Walk towards the sunshine and the shadows will fall behind you.
0
Cari-in-Oly

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,953
Reply with quote  #4 
Cap'n Dick Wightman used to have one of these, you can read his evaluation of it on TreadleOn:

http://www.treadleon.net/sewingmachineshop/janome/janome.html


Cari

__________________
Olympia Washington
0
Farmer John

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 980
Reply with quote  #5 
The Janome 712T head weighs in at 15.2 pounds, takes standard 15x1 needles, and what appears to be class 15 bobbins.  The 6 supplied bobbins are plastic.  The sm is low side shank, with quick change attachments.The machine body is die cast aluminum, while the face plate, & top cover are plastic.  The handwheel is steel or cast iron.  Also pictured is the cam stack and helical cam stack drive gear, which appears to be one piece and also all plastic.  Even when straight stitching, this entire cam stack is constantly turning, which adds drag to the drive train.  Due to this, I doubt that the machine will even loosen up to treadle easily.  I recently treadled a Pfaff 130, which required an equal amount of treadle effort.  If I was only straight stitching quilt blocks, I wouldn't use this machine.  A cogged rubber timing belt is used to transmit motion from the main top shaft to the lower part on the sm for fabric feed and hook rotation.  The full rotary hook makes two turns per stitch.  The needleplate has a clear plastic cover, and when the plate is removed, the black plastic non rotating bobbin basket can be seen with the thread escapement system.  The basket has a steel thread guide insert.  Being an alien from a past century, the pictoral graphics of the stitch controls leave me scratching my head, but the same can be said of my new car.  I'll examine below decks next time.
Farmer John
100_1100.jpg 100_1101.jpg 100_1102.jpg 100_1104.jpg

0
treadlecrazy

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 58
Reply with quote  #6 
The main advantage of the Janome 712T over vintage zig-zag machines that can be treadled is that it handles sewing elastic and stretchy knit fabrics well. Most vintage machines that I've tried skip stitches on these fabrics, since they were designed before these fabrics were available. You also get a larger stitch selection with the Janome 712T.

I found this machine difficult to treadle. I had to put it on a treadle base with a small drive wheel. I was told by someone on one of the yahoo groups that it does break in after a while and get easier to treadle, but I haven't used it enough to know if this is true. I've since gotten a Singer 411G that I set up to treadle, and I prefer to use that instead. The 411G does almost as well as the Janome on stretchy knit fabrics, and can make all of the types of stitches I use frequently.

__________________
Leila
http://www.growyourownclothes.com
0
Sewnoma

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,047
Reply with quote  #7 
I think this is really interesting.  I like Janome - my daily-use machine is a 6600 and I love that thing.  I've never treadled anything, however.  I didn't even realize there were modern-made treadle machines until a few years ago.  Until you were talking about stretch-stitches I couldn't really imagine why you'd want one!  So this thread has been interesting to me.


__________________
Happily stitching in Santa Rosa, California

0
redbugsullivan

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 108
Reply with quote  #8 

Thanks to Farmer John, and links that have more links, I have found several answers to my questions.  It needs 7 1/2" of clearance to be completely lowered, any hinged spring hardware to assist lowering and raising must be removed. Some carving will be required on one corner. 

Out of all that I have read, it appears that most folks have not had the tenacity to continue treadling long enough to "break it in." Of course, that makes me think about finding an alternative belt drive hooked to a larger electric motor, not sewing machine type. Different sized pulleys would reduce rotation ratios. Then I could break it in without killing my legs and time.


__________________
Annette
Walk towards the sunshine and the shadows will fall behind you.
0
Farmer John

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 980
Reply with quote  #9 
The Janome 712T must have been designed by a non-sewing committee.  Most annoying is that the sewing area exists on three different planes.  First, there is the overall bed level, then secondly, the needle plate rises above the bed.  Thirdly, and worst of all, is the hollowed out section of the bed (below bed level), directly in front of the needle plate.  This guarantees to flip over every seam , requiring a stop for seam adjustment before the seam reaches the needle.
     The presser foot is 11/16 inch wide, as are the feed dogs.  Using a narrow foot doesn't cover the feed dogs.  An offset fabric stop would be necessary to sew with 1/4 inch seam allowance, and then only the left feed dog would grasp the fabric, causing the fabric to turn away from the fabric guide.  There is a central portion to the feed dog, but it is 5/8 inch further rearward than the narrow side sections of the dog.
     With a small block of wood and two clamps, a motor is easily attached to run the Janome.  No amount of "break-in" will eliminate the fact that a lot of extra machinery is always being treadled along in the event that a decorative stitch is desired.
100_1109.jpg 100_1110.jpg 100_1111.jpg 

0
redbugsullivan

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 108
Reply with quote  #10 
As always, John, your advise and suggestions are well thought out and insightful! Thank you for the input, especially the side mount motor suggestion. We know a several "preppers" and this machine comes up from time to time as a hot topic.

Bottom line? If a sewer is off grid, this machine has its place. While it may not be the easiest to treadle, nor the ideal machine for many reasons, it can suffice. Stretchy knits can be joined, seams repaired, and gnarly holes fixed without electricity. Needles and bobbins are basic and readily available. People power comes from inspiration and need. In which case, the Janome 712T has a place in our sewing world.

__________________
Annette
Walk towards the sunshine and the shadows will fall behind you.
0
Cari-in-Oly

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,953
Reply with quote  #11 
If the Janome has a needle position selector, the simple way to get around fighting the wide feed dogs to sew a 1/4" seam is to put the needle in left position and guide the fabric at the inside right edge of the center of the foot. I do it with my Juki and have no feeding issues.

Cari

__________________
Olympia Washington
0
treadlecrazy

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 58
Reply with quote  #12 
This conversation got me motivated to try to "break in" my Janome 712T again. I got mine used, but it looked almost new, and I haven't used it much.

I had just cut out three pairs of pants for my son, so I decided to sew them on the Janome. I spent three days sewing the pants. They have front and back pockets and topstitching, so this was a fair amount of sewing.

After sewing for a bit, I realized my belt was slipping. It was already pretty tight, so I couldn't tighten it more. I rubbed it beeswax, which stopped the slipping. Then it occurred to me that I should oil the machine since it had been sitting unused so long. After that it ran a little easier.

Did all of that sewing break in the machine? I don't think so. I think it broke me, though! I have fibromyalgia-like issues, and my calf muscles tighten up painfully with any unaccustomed exercise. Except for my serger, I sew exclusively on treadle sewing machines, and the only time I've had an issue with my legs before is after spending hours sewing satin stitches at top speed. I've always scoffed when people say that using a treadle sewing machine is exercise - it hardly takes any effort at all. Well, except when you sew on a Janome 712T. I was actually breathing hard a couple of times, and I definitely felt the burn in my legs. So, yeah. My legs hurt, and I'll be doing a lot of stretching the next few days. Now I feel stupid for using that machine for so long. I'm just obstinate, I guess, and I didn't want to feel like a quitter.

As for the issue with 1/4" seams - I "cheated" and sewed the curved 1/4" seams on the pocket openings on my Singer 201. I did notice that on the Janome you can put the needle in the left position and guide the fabric along the right edge of the hole in the presser foot to get approximately 1/4", but the presser foot obscures the fabric as it goes under the foot, so it wouldn't be as accurate as I'm used to.

One other frustration is that I can't use any of my presser feet from my other machines with this machine. It has the Janome version of low-shank. You can't use standard low shank or snap-on feet with it (except for a low shank adjustable zipper foot). The needle bar is offset a little toward the side of the presser bar instead of being in line with it. Janome uses this configuration on their higher end machines to make sure you spend more money on their brand name presser feet.

__________________
Leila
http://www.growyourownclothes.com
0
Cari-in-Oly

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,953
Reply with quote  #13 
Leila I have a clear foot I use on my Juki so I can see what's going on. Since my Juki is the low end model 27 I was able to buy an inexpensive set of accessories for it.

Cari

__________________
Olympia Washington
0
jennasquiltn

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 99
Reply with quote  #14 
I haven't read all the comments here but wanted to say I really liked mine when I had it.  The only issue I had was it decided to start sticking in reverse.  Took it in for repair and that seemed to fix it.
0
redbugsullivan

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 108
Reply with quote  #15 
An update- and food for thought. This machine doesn't fit in my collection so the decision was made to fit it into a chopped off Singer treadle (previous owner cut off the drawer sections) with irons that are in good shape. The cabinet needed modifications to house the Janome head and allow it to be fully lowered for storage. Yes, there is a "broken in" period for best functioning. Find an energetic child and tell them they have to go fast, fast, fast, for as long as they can, as many times a day as possible. I would time how long we could go before we tuckered out. Of course, they would beat me. [wink]  It does run smoother now and is not as tough to get it started. 

Here the alterations are in no specific order:

  • Spring to help raise and lower head completely removed (that was exciting)
  • Front lip support for head when in use, 1/4" of inner edge taken off so head seated properly (six screws and strategic table saw use)
  • Front lip support, head support when stored, removed (looks like a melted L)
  • Lower dust cover removed due to head size (it could have stayed but would have eventually broken)
  • Janome head, spool holder was too high when stored to allow for the top to close. Altered to make removable for storage by cutting two slots in the plastic so it can easily slide on and off the support bolts
  • Black 1/4" rubber screen spline in lieu of leather belt to reduce potential slipping
Hopefully this helps someone along the road. It should be ready to sell in about a week. Wish me success!!


__________________
Annette
Walk towards the sunshine and the shadows will fall behind you.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.