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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #1 
Do bare with me, I'm doing this in stages and I'm sorting as I go.

015Singer2801.jpg 

I believe this is the 1901 Sphinx. It was given to me at a yard sale. The couple were desperate to downsize and I'd stopped by twice before and the lady saw my interest and said: Take it, please take it. One less doorstop to move. It was filthy. It was so filthy that I never knew the decals were there until one day when I thought to clean it up. Needless to say I was quite surprised when the dirt layer began to fall away.

016Singer2802.jpg 

The above is a Roger's Ohio Flea Market Grab. $20 bucks. How crazy is that? I still need to detail it out, but still... hard to find Pheasant with nice decals.

017Singer6601.jpg 

This one I know well. It came from a CL ad across town in Penn Hills. I was delighted to have it since it was nestled into a first gen Type 40 table. little did I know then that none of my 101s were going t plop down into that table. The table surface has veneer issues I still need to attend, and it's wired for a 66, meaning no rod assembly for the 101. The machine head is from 1919 and I can't begin to guess how that happened, and the really neat thing is the left leg knee control. More pics soon.

018Singer12801.jpg 

025Singer201k3o1.jpg 

Might not have been the most intelligent trade.. but I wanted a 201k3 and had an 'extra' Pfaff 130 and cabinet (Doesn't everyone?). So that's what happened. Since I'd be hard pressed to break up the Centennial group... all of the other potted motor 201s are available. I need room.

026Singer201o3.jpg 

201 AK906696

028Singer201o4.jpg

201 AK558540

Singer201ak69.jpg 

201 AK693930

027Singer1591o2.jpg

15-91 AG790546

073Singer1591b.jpg 

15-91 AH269930

030Singer127BW1.jpg  031Singer127BW2.jpg

Ah the twins, Castor and Pollox. They've been here forever. Two 127 blackslide crinkle finish machines in bentwood cases that share one key. They should probably find a better home. They've been seriously ignored.   

There's at least one more to go here, if not two, and one might go in a treadle only thread. I will also address all of the 101s separately.



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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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Mkwatts

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Reply with quote  #2 


I have a 127 sphinx with a serial number pictured below. I am not sure by am reading it correctly. Is it a six or seven digit number? Either way, I can't seem to find it listed as a 127.

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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #3 
The Singer 'G' series is somewhat ridiculous in that in attempts to span the years 1910 to 1924. They never tried this again, probably because it got so huge. The seven digit G numbers are clear at the bottom of the ISMACs list. Your machine dates from 18 December 1923.
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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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Mkwatts

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks. I didn't scroll far enough down.
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #5 
Digging through the cabinets last night I added yet another 201 head and a 15-91 to this list.
That's -five- working machine heads I do not need. Good grief!
I should have done this last year!

__________________
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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Phyllis1115

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Reply with quote  #6 
When anyone shows their quilts, I always notice whether I have/had the same fabrics. And when anyone shows off their sewing machines, I notice whether I have the same machines. I admit to sometimes coveting (Lust in my heart) machines I do not have. [smile] 

One of these days, I need to create a photo list of my machines for my organized attorney daughter. 

I have two Singer 27 sisters from the same 50,000 serial number allotment. The beautiful Pheasant decaled machine is noisy, but sews ok. The worn Memphis/Sphinx machine is smooth, quiet and sews beautifully. I admire the Pheasant's beauty, but love to use the worn Memphis decaled machine.

Do you go for beautiful machines or beautiful, quiet stitching



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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phyllis1115

Do you go for beautiful machines or beautiful, quiet stitching.


Yes.

Sorting though all of these machines has enabled me to step back and evaluate just what is it that I'm doing?  It all started out innocently enough with trying to fill my Sister's want list. The problem was all the crazy inexpensive machines I met along the way. That feeling of "if I didn't pick up this ten dollar machine right this minute, chances are it'll end up in the landfill" and that didn't seem right. So in that first year or so a few hundred machines came and went. It was a crash coarse on the history and evolution of sewing machines.

What I got out of all that was a greater appreciation of the design, whether it was internal or external.  I didn't allow myself to be swayed by the critics or naysayers and made up my own mind through experience.

I enjoy the appearance of the decal wearing Singers. the Filigree, or Memphis, the Lotus or Pheasant - and especially the earlier ones with things like Dogwood blooms and Daisies. As much as I value the look of these older machines... I'd much rather sew with one built between 1948 and 1963.

For me, and perhaps no one else, what the fifties machines lack in hand painted decoration they make up for in the mechanical design. The mechanism of the zigzag stitch is different between the Necchi and the Pfaff or the Kenmore and the Singer. The complexities of the mechanics have a certain aesthetic. The deco cams and the amazing way the needle bar moves. It can be both complicated and oddly graceful.

At this moment in time, having worked on so many, what I want to have close by when I need to use a sewing machine are the heavier and slightly simpler fifties electrics. These machines usually pick right up from when they last were used. Minimal maintenance, durable, and a good stitch in an almost silent machine - these are the traits that win me over.

On the other hand there are the pretties. The unusual designs, odd paint schemes, metallic blues, bright yellows, strangely colored dials and lights. Those are all fun conversation pieces. So that's where I see this heading; a room of oddities and artwork and a handful of reliable work horses. =)

__________________
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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