Victorian Sweatshop Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Jim/Steelsewing

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,401
Reply with quote  #1 
There may not be a lot of call for this procedure... but in this situation the bobbin carrier appeared to be faulty and the two tiny little screws that may have been placed 99 years ago... did not want to break loose. I could have continued to soak the screws down twice a day and kept trying, but I had a donor machine... so why not, right?

To begin I had removed; the face plate, deck cover, presser foot, needle plate, feed dogs and lastly the needle. The round lower inspection plate had been removed, and as awkward as it became, I had not removed the machine from the cabinet and managed everything by rolling it up and back. I had made sure that the hook timing was correct before I began.

The next thing to do was to remove the half inch wide plate that has the bobbin carrier stop. This plate keeps the bobbin carrier from rotating when the hook assembly spins. It is held on by two brass or copper colored screws that attach from below and the screws turn into the underside.

heads.jpg 

The heads can barely be seen here. I had to move the chair out of the way and squat down with a work light and a flash light just to find them. I broke them loose with a long screwdriver, and then swapped that for a much smaller screwdriver that I had magnetized. When the screws became loose from the deck, you needed a steady hand to guide them out. 

bargone.jpg 

Once they were out the stop plate needed to be removed, which meant rolling the machine back down, finding the chair again and removing the bar. With the bobbin carrier in the right spot, the plate can be wiggled left, and then back, and it pops right out.

IMG_4258.jpg 

Then I returned to the underside and removed the cog from the shaft of the hook assembly. Do note that there are two set screws on the cog and there is a machined flat spot on the shaft.

flat.jpg 

It seems obvious to me that one of the two set screws should tighten into the flat.

With the cog out, and the plate above removed the shaft will move. On one machine it moved by hand and slid right out, on the other it took a tap. Be careful removing the hook assembly since it moves upward... the needle must be removed and the assembly may have to rotate to find the one place where it will clear the needle bar.

IMG_4261.jpg 
IMG_4262.jpg 
Underneath the bobbin assembly... it was filthy. It took a little bit to get all the oily and hardened lint bits out and everything cleaned up.

It was time then to install the spare assembly. I gave the shaft a drop or two of sewing machine oil and rubbed it around before slipping the spare into place. Then came the real fun!


I had to sit back for a minute and try to figure out how to put the stop plate in, and keep it in place while rolling the machine up to attempt screwing it back in. The answer was right there on the table next to me; a piece of thread.

IMG_4263.jpg 

Making sure to have the stop plate and the bobbin carrier in alignment... (not shown, but I figured it out) I tied off one side of the stop plate by running a piece of thread down the screw hole, through the plate hole, and around the deck. This kept the plate from shifting just enough to roll the machine back and play a long and somewhat tedious game of pin the screw back into place at the end of a magnetic screw driver while avoiding all the other mechanics as if playing Operation...

IMG_4264.jpg 

Oddly, it did not take as long as I imagined. The first screw started on the third attempt and leaving it not tightened... I rolled the machine back down, removed the thread and went back for the second screw. It also took three attempts before starting. Then I snugged them both down - again, making sure the bobbin carrier was still in the correct place.

Not done yet... I put the needle back in place and rotated the wheel to set the hook timing (the needle bar timing should still be set). With the needle in the right place (second or lower mark) I spun the hook assembly around and even though it's difficult to see with the bobbin carrier in the way... set the hook to it's proper place (Just a hair past the needle). Now, the trick was going to be returning the shaft cog and locking it down without moving the hook and making sure one set screw lined up with the flat. The cog does not go straight on, it turns into the gears. Fun. Fun. That took a few tries as well.

With everything where the adjuster's manual said it should be... I spun the hand wheel around in several rotations and checked to make sure all the parts stayed where they were supposed to be. Everything seemed to be in agreement and being terribly excited by this, I returned the feed dog plate and face plate and threaded the machine and watched the upper thread do exactly what it was supposed to do. No jams, no odd paths, it looked promising. It was time to test with a bobbin.

IMG_4265.jpg 

By hand, the machine made stitches with no jamming issues! The odd thing (?) was listening to the upper tension spring - something I hadn't heard before.  Tension would have to be adjusted on top, but with all of this looking really good, I returned the deck plate and presser foot and plugged the machine back in.

IMG_4266.jpg 

Playing with the stitch length lever as it spun... there were no issues that minor adjustments couldn't remedy. For that matter, the machine was even quieter... as if it approved. So, apparently Lucky lives to sew again! I'll get to the fine tuning later today, or perhaps tomorrow. The old bobbin and hook assembly are in a jar soaking...


__________________
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
0
SteveH-VSS

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 5,178
Reply with quote  #2 
Excellent write up!  Thanks and congrats!
__________________
Antioch, California
0
Chaly

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 901
Reply with quote  #3 
Wonderful work!  So glad to hear of your success.  Your summary may prove  a very useful resource for anyone else attempting this type of work.  
0
Christy

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,599
Reply with quote  #4 
Great job! I'm glad after all that it was a success!  With such a nice write up, if anyone else needs to do this, they will now have a reference!


__________________
  • Christy
  • Ukiah, California


0
pgf

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,228
Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks for documenting that job!
__________________
My machines: http://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/by-age
0
Jim/Steelsewing

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,401
Reply with quote  #6 
Thank you all. It wouldn't leave me alone last night. I tossed and turned and finally gave in and at 5am with the coffee machine still working I set to work. Wish there were a few more pictures, but that would have taken even more hands. I can't begin to express how happy I am to have it sewing. Out of all the 101's, this is the one I drove too far for and paid a little too much. The '21 cabinet is nearly perfect, the attachments were all there plus some (even the oil can!). The manual has almost survived... and all that's really left to fix is the pull chain on the light... and some wiring connections and it'll be close to perfect.

IMG_4267.jpg 

I spent some time today just cleaning up, putting the '29 back together. still have cabinet work to do on that one, and manged to get the Florence Rotary in the shop and it's not turning, feels like it's stuck in the front end... so much to do.


__________________
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
0
johnstuart

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,005
Reply with quote  #7 
Good to hear you got that 101 going, wow that is a lot of work. If i recall correct this it the one with the early connectors? A great machine for any collection.

  John
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.