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pgf

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Reply with quote  #1 
I wanted to do something for my newborn grand-niece, and I wanted to sew something on my Home.  I'd made a star like this once before, so I decided to do a pair of stuffed pillows.  I think they're probably more appropriate for hanging, rather than hugging, because I'm suspicious of the poly-fil fibers that are leaking through the cloth weave.

star_moon.jpg 

I'm reasonably pleased, but if I ever make more, I'll adjust my (homemade) pattern proportions.  The moon doesn't have the happy plump look I was hoping for.

I did learn a new skill, though -- I'd never done a slip stitch before (for hand closing the final opening).

paul


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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #2 
Very cute!  It's always so special to get handmade gifts and more so that you used a piece of your collection.  I love the celestial theme.
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #3 
Those are cute! My youngest DD loves celestial stuff too, so much so that she has the planets tattooed down the back of one arm and the moon phases down the back of her other arm.

Cari

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Deb

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Reply with quote  #4 

Good job...nicely done!

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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #5 
Ditto what Deb in WI said!
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks all!

If I do this again someday, I'd prefer to not use poly-fil again.  Not only does the package say "Don't give to babies or put in cribs", or something like that, but little poly-fil fibers escape through the seams and the weave itself.  (I always pictured the moon and star as hanging decorations anyway, so I'm not too upset about this.)  I did get it to mostly stop coming through the weave with some spray starch (inherited from my mother -- $0.99 for the large spray can.  I can't believe it still works), but I think I'd prefer to use a "safer" stuffing in the future.

What should I use for stuffing next time, and where would I get it?  Nothing jumped out at me on JoAnn's website, for instance.

paul

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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #7 
Paul, nice plush! What type of fabric did you use for the moon and stars? I wonder if it had a more open weave? Perhaps using a tightly woven lining fabric, such as a broadcloth, or old sheet remnant?

Thank you for the heads up on the label, my DGD is turning 1, and if I make her the soft side playhouse with tiny stuffed animals, I'll have to adjust the stuffing material.

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hell group,  

  Not having a clue regarding stuffings but finding it of interest (having failed miserably making one supposed-to-be-cool stuffed toy about 2 years ago I giggled (googled) it.  I found this really informative link.  What I found interesting is the Kapok fiber which is an indigenous tree in the Philippines and I heard (and verified on line) used to be even used in life jackets in WW2.   Any kind of possible filling is covered here including different types of poly-fil and apparently there is quite a few available.  Best regards, Mike
https://www.funkyfriendsfactory.com/blog/toy-stuffing/

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks for that link Mike.  Nice to have a full list of options.

Lori -- the fabric was something that I already had in my minimal collection -- I think my wife bought it, hoping I'd sew something with it.  I forget what, and I guess it never happened.  :-)  It has a name on the border, which I googled, and amazingly someone was recently selling a pre-washed 3/4 yard on ebay.  (Who would have thought?)  They saved me the trouble of taking a picture, and their ad also confirmed that it's 100% cotton.   I think a tighter weave would be better.  I also read that using fusible interfacing would work too.

paul

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #10 
Hello group,  Have to wonder if a fine fabric lining sewn with favorite outer material would negate the issues of fiber migrating. Possibly the best of both worlds.  Might not be too complicated to do.  After reading the link several times just gotta wonder if old school is still better as they said the kapok was popular in teddy bears.  I mean if "eco friendly" Doctor Seuss is good enough to charge 25 clams (flin tstones currency)....it can't be all that bad.  Link below.  Best regards, Mike https://www.ecochoices.com/ecotoytown/dolls/animals.html
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #11 
Pre washing cotton fabric will tighten the weave a bit too because it shrinks.

Cari

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cari-in-Oly
Pre washing cotton fabric will tighten the weave a bit too because it shrinks.

Cari


I did do that -- I'm sure it was something subliminal from having my mother sew so many of her own clothes back in
the 60s and 70s.

But a question:  Should it be washed, and dried, at the hottest possible temperatures, for maximum shrinkage?

paul

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #13 
When I shrink my canvas prior to making armor padding with it, I wash and dry it several times.  I get a LOT of reduction in the long direction, less in the width on the first pass and geometrically less each time, but after three or four passes, it is pretty much done.  Then the garments made are washable.
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superpickles

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Reply with quote  #14 
I always do my prewash as hot as I can, with vinegar in the water to get out as much sizing as possible. My fabric is generally used in clothing however, I want no color bleeding in my kid's dresses and no shrinking once it's assembled.
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #15 
I pre wash fabric for garment sewing washing in the required temps. The only pre washing I do for making quilts is flannel. Twice through the wash and dry in hot water.

Cari

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