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Jpwest

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Reply with quote  #1 
My W&w No 8 was stored in an attic for 50 years including the dirt of a couple of tornados. I have been gently oiling it to discover the hint of decals.

At first I thought the black paint had crackled but now I think it’s caked on dirt and soot. It’s coming off the steel and brass pieces. Anyone else had good luck getting funky sooty caked on dirt off the paint? Soapy water didn’t touch it.

Also, does the tension disk have felt disks or am I finding felted threads?

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #2 
yes, they had felt disks to hold the oil.
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Jpwest

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks for the info
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #4 
Here is my early W&W #8 top tension disassembled prior to cleaning

20140920_154712.jpg 


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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #5 
I have found jojoba oil, coconut oil, or Simple Green cleaner often work to get rid of black crud, without damage to paint or decals. Always best to test first. Apply, use white paper towel to rub off, if towel gets dirty it's working.
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #6 
I use sewing machine oil on machines that have artwork remaining. No water ever.
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #7 
When I've cleaned up machines I use a baking soda paste on the metal parts.   Baking soda is alkaline and a degreaser (thus my oven cleaner).  

I used this approach on the first machine - many years ago that I was fixing up.  I didn't have any metal polisher so thought I would try the baking soda.  It worked so great for me that to this day I have never used a metal polish.  It shines and gets off all the old dirt and gummy oil.  For anything that is corroded with rust I use Evaporust and then follow up with the baking soda.  

I've used a toothbrush, microfiber cloth, magic eraser, and 0000 steel wool as scrubbing aids- depending on the part.  I make a thick paste with water and then scrub.  I rinse with water and then follow up with alcohol.  Then dry thoroughly, oil and/or wax.

My metal parts always get shiny and bright and I've never had scratches.

This is only for metal non-painted parts and of course I would recommend always testing first on a sample before doing this for real.
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samiamaquilter

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Reply with quote  #8 
I like to clean my black head machines with "Goop" hand cleaner without pumice. Try it on a small place first and don't leave it for an extended time like over night thinking longer will make it clean better. I use old t-shirt pieces to clean with.  It doesn't seem to harm the clear coat that is left on the machine and it is certainly kind to my old hands. I have had the clear coat come off when I first started cleaning machines. I thought it was all the dirt and grim and grease but it was the clear coat. Some clear coat just flakes off and I have intensionally removed it with my fingernail or a credit card. I avoided the decals because once the clear coat is gone on them, they will wear more quickly. Never use water or alcohol on a black head machine. A shiny surface is under the yellowing, flaking clear coat if you want to remove the clear coat. On some machines that looks better than what the clear coat had become. I usually leave mild glazing alone unless it is loose.

Sammie quilter in NC
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