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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #1 
On my current project I'm using my beloved pinker attachment.  It's such a great convenient way to pink fabric - much much easier for me than pinking shears (another topic in itself!).I also have a straight edge blade which comes in handy for when I want to cut strips of cloth like when I make bias binding.

It's a marvel of engineering.  The blades cut due to pressure on a metal cylinder (which can be adjusted) and therefore don't become dull or need replacement.  It has bearings and gears and one can adjust the width of the cut.  I was very lucky to come by one - it was in a pile with other attachments that came with one of my machines.

I've used it on my Singer 201 and 15-91 (it's a low shank attachment) but when I tried it on my Singer 101 it didn't work.  It fits properly but the needle bar goes down a bit further on the 101 than the attachment's gears are designed - I'm thinking this attachment came after the 101?  Maybe the needle down can be adjusted on my 101 but I don't want to mess with it since I have other machines it works fine on - just some info for those 101 owners.

There is a hand crank version and I'm not sure if this functions the same and how easy it is to turn the crank and guide the material- maybe someone here that has a hand crank version can comment.  

Anyway, I love this attachment and use it frequently in the type of sewing I do - on woven fabrics where I want to hand overcast - the pinking guides my hand overcasting and this produces a seam that has very little bulk and no showing of ridges on the right side, and allows attachment to the underlining so the seam allowance stays open.  I have a photo example of this from my current project - linen with organza underlining.
pinker.jpg  pinkerside.jpg  pinker blade.jpg  pinkerinuse.jpg  overcastseam enlarged.jpg 


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pgf

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Reply with quote  #2 
Thanks -- I didn't know about those attachments.
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Ana's Dad

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks for a great post, Chaly. I have one of these sitting in the box and now I've got to give it a try -- perhaps on the 201. .. I've used the hand crank version which is just fine for smaller pieces of fabric but this looks much more efficient for longer runs.

Cheers

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #4 
I have both the attachment and hand pinkers. Back in 2009, or so, Simplicity had a pinking machine that had a little larger 'harp' so one could make wider strips. I didn't get the machine, but I got about seven of the blades for it. I found that they would work for the Singer pinkers, if you took a Dremel to the center hole --- not much. I did a lot of paper pinking. I tried some vinyl, but it squeeked loudly, no matter how I adjusted it. I found if I put calculator tape on top and bottom it didn't squeek.

I also found a "Roto-Pink" which is similar to a Florian pinker. It had a broken spring inside the gear. I took it to my brother to see if he could fix it. He did, but said he hoped I didn't pay very much for it as the blade was really dull. I giggled and then had to show him how it used pressure to cut.

I actually prefer the hand pinker over the attachment. I had some nylon windbreaker type fabric and used the hand pinker. I also stitched by where I pinked the ends. Then I washed and dried it. I was amazed at the lack of strings from washing and drying.
I tried it on some corduroy and another piece of fabric. It didn't come out quite as nice, but didn't have a tangled mess of thread and fabric.

Janey

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #5 
I have both the Singer hand crank pinker and the attachment model. The hand crank unit is my preference too, although the one that mounts on the machine is a fun toy. Generally, I consider pinking only good for felt or light leather for most projects. Even my old set of pinking shears were used very little when I soon found that pinking fabric is generally a waste of time. It really doesn't protect raw edges at all unless the fabric is solid or felted. That's where I learned to enjoy all the special stitch discs that are available for my zigzag machines and later even the sergers. Using a serger is quick, but specialized. A machine with a good overcast stitch cam is great, but slow with the two-way stitch - it takes about 4 times as long to sew one piece that way. 

Still, pinking tools are great for limited use. I love the wavy pinking the Singer unit does instead of the sharp V type of the scissors. 

-Bruce
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seb58

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Reply with quote  #6 
That's a cool attachment! I want one now!! [crazy]
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #7 
Well that's a cool attachment.  I never heard of one of those before but now I'll keep my eyes open for one!
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OurWorkbench


I also found a "Roto-Pink" which is similar to a Florian pinker. It had a broken spring inside the gear. I took it to my brother to see if he could fix it. He did, but said he hoped I didn't pay very much for it as the blade was really dull. I giggled and then had to show him how it used pressure to cut.

Janey


I've seen pictures of the Florian pinker and have wondered how easy they are to use to get an even cut.  They are fun to see and use the same idea with pressure.  It's great not to have to worry about blades dulling and replacing.  You are fortunate to have some other blades.  I have also heard there are replica blades for the vintage attachment that are available.

I'm amazed what a great resource this forum is  - there are so many experienced folks that have such interesting info to share.  Thank you!
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonesHand52
Generally, I consider pinking only good for felt or light leather for most projects. Even my old set of pinking shears were used very little when I soon found that pinking fabric is generally a waste of time. It really doesn't protect raw edges at all unless the fabric is solid or felted. That's where I learned to enjoy all the special stitch discs that are available for my zigzag machines and later even the sergers. Using a serger is quick, but specialized. A machine with a good overcast stitch cam is great, but slow with the two-way stitch - it takes about 4 times as long to sew one piece that way. 

-Bruce


Bruce, I enjoyed your feedback and knowing some more about what people have and how they use these vintage tools.

I agree, the pinking does not protect most raw edges but for my purposes pinking has a serious purpose. I use pinking not to prevent raveling (although it reduces it a bit on most fabrics for a prewash or lining or during the construction process) but to guide my hand overcasting.  

I think an average consensus would be "why would anyone take time to hand overcast?" For couture sewing, serging is a no-no.  For my couture sewing projects, I either hand overcast or do a machine overcast on my Singer slants (with an overcast foot and overcast stitch).  Even today, the genuine haute couture garments are finished in this way.  When I learned of this, I had to convince myself that the time for these hand methods provided a valuable result.  A hand overcast seam has less bulk and is not stiff (serging adds a lot of stiffness and also bulk from all the threads).  Once I applied this technique and wore a garment - the difference was surprising.  It's hard to explain, but firstly, the seams don't show on the right side and the fitting and comfort level is highly improved.  You have a lot more control with hand overcasting and don't stretch or mishape your seam edges. This is especially apparent in garments such as silk blouses and tailored boucle type jackets.  Couture sewing is about fit and structure - being as precise as possible.

This method of making a garment is very time consuming and not all my projects use all of the techniques - but for me, on much of my work, the methods are worth the extra time commitment.  

It's interesting, but the more I read vintage sewing books/resources, the more I see the couture techniques used for most home sewing up until about 1940's. 

Couture sewing methods are not always better for every project and there is an important place for modern methods and techniques.  But it's been interesting for me to learn and explore the differences.  I think becoming involved in vintage sewing machines helped me to learn and understand better some of the techniques of the past.
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #10 
I really haven't used the Roto-Pink much. The thing I like about it is that you aren't limited to cutting straight first. For example if you wanted to cut a circle (or other shape) out of a piece of fabric, you could mark the shape and then just use the Roto-Pink. I thought it would come in handy for trimming things like faced neck edges or armholes. I'm thinking for strips that need to be the same width, it may not do as well as the hand crank or attachment.

Janey

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Deb

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Reply with quote  #11 
Thanks for the excellent write-up! 
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OurWorkbench
... I thought it would come in handy for trimming things like faced neck edges or armholes. 

Janey


I was looking up something tonight in one of my sewing reference books and came across this and immediately thought of your comment [smile]

pinked facing.jpg 

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Aronel

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Reply with quote  #13 
Nice, I have one that came in the original box, but I have never used it.
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ellellbee

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OurWorkbench

I also found a "Roto-Pink" which is similar to a Florian pinker. It had a broken spring inside the gear. I took it to my brother to see if he could fix it. He did, but said he hoped I didn't pay very much for it as the blade was really dull. I giggled and then had to show him how it used pressure to cut.
Janey


I just got the table mount Singer pinker but find it doesn't cut well. I had thought maybe it needs sharpening. Guess not. What tips and tricks do i need to know about it? Is there a way to adjust the pressure for different fabrics?

Lindsey
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Farmer John

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Reply with quote  #15 
Here is a pix of an upside down pinker.  To adjust pressure, loosen the small bind screw on the left and turn the eccentric shaft via the large slotted screw.  With desired pressure achieved, retighten the bind screw.
100_1790.jpg 

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellellbee
...pressure for different fabrics?

Lindsey


There are instructions for the attachment and hand crank near the bottom of the page at  https://singer-featherweight.com/blogs/schoolhouse/pink-pinker-pinking It seems like there is a direction (clockwise or counter-) to turn the big screw - that seems to work better.  Neither of the instructions seem to mention that.

Janey



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ellellbee

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Reply with quote  #17 
Thank you. I was given this pinker without the clamp or instructions. I appreciate the feedback.
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #18 
ellellbee, do you need measurements for the clamp? The clamp didn't come with my first hand pinker. The first clamp I bought for it didn't work as top part didn't go in far enough to hold properly.

Janey

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ellellbee

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OurWorkbench
ellellbee, do you need measurements for the clamp? The clamp didn't come with my first hand pinker. The first clamp I bought for it didn't work as top part didn't go in far enough to hold properly.

Janey


Yes, please. I will raid our shop and try them all but that would help a fair bit. Did you just use a wood clamp?

Lindsey
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ellellbee

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Reply with quote  #20 

Thanks, Janey. I am home from my holiday and on my laptop again. I hate phones. I thought I answered you on my phone but it didn't seem to take. I appreciate the help and feedback. 
Lindsey
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #21 
Lindsey,

I hope you can get it working once you have the clamp and get the pressure adjusted.  On my attachment pinker, I just had to set the pressure once after I first got it and it's been fine since - even with different thicknesses of fabric.  I have not tried it for non-fabric uses such as paper.
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ellellbee

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmer John
Here is a pix of an upside down pinker.  To adjust pressure, loosen the small bind screw on the left and turn the eccentric shaft via the large slotted screw.  With desired pressure achieved, retighten the bind screw.
100_1790.jpg 

Excellent. A picture is worth a thousand words. That is much clearer. Thank you. 
Lindsey


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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #23 
Actually, the Husky 2 inch c-clamp is really, really close to the same size as Simanco 121716. the shape is a tad different and where it clamps to the top of the Pinker - the Simanco one has a slight v-shape versus the Husky's is flat.

The first one I got and used was a red Husky. I thought about painting it, but decided to leave it.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-2-in-C-Clamp-HD-2016-0302/207119522 would probably work.

If the pdf at singer-featherweight is the one I think it is for the hand pinker the instructions to regulate the pressure is in the middle of the second page. The pages look to be mixed up.

Janey

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ellellbee

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OurWorkbench
Actually, the Husky 2 inch c-clamp is really, really close to the same size as Simanco 121716. the shape is a tad different and where it clamps to the top of the Pinker - the Simanco one has a slight v-shape versus the Husky's is flat.

The first one I got and used was a red Husky. I thought about painting it, but decided to leave it.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-2-in-C-Clamp-HD-2016-0302/207119522 would probably work.

If the pdf at singer-featherweight is the one I think it is for the hand pinker the instructions to regulate the pressure is in the middle of the second page. The pages look to be mixed up.

Janey

Thank you. 

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaly


I was looking up something tonight in one of my sewing reference books and came across this and immediately thought of your comment [smile]

pinked facing.jpg 


Yes, I like "Sewing Skills" too. I think there are a few versions of it and the 1955 version (grayscale) can be found at http://ismacs.net/singer_sewing_machine_company/manuals/singer-sewing-skills-reference-book.pdf

Actually, I haven't done much garment sewing to really warrant and use it as I initially thought. I saw/read one time about trimming the neckline seam before under-stitching with pinking shears so one wouldn't need to clip the neck edge to make it lay flat.

Janey

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #26 
It's great to know there is a PDF of Sewing Skills  - mine is the 1954 edition and does not have the zig-zag info that the PDF has - so Singer added this then for the 1955 version.  I got mine with a packet envelope labeled "Project Material" and it corresponds to the lessons and there are wax paper packets labeled with each lesson and contain the supplies - material, trims, templates, etc.

I think this was part of a class that Singer gave when one bought a sewing machine.  The envelope says "Available to class members only for $2.95."

It's fun for me to look at the completed samples from the lessons - especially the fashion stitches.  I think this book is one of the best resources for beginning instruction for machine embroidery- fashion stitches.

Thanks for sharing the PDF link - I would not have known to check ISMACS for these kind of references.
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #27 
Hello group,

  OK I'm on the hunt for a straight blade pinking/pinker machine so I can make awesome low volume bias strips the way Chaly does it with hers to precision.  Was just on ebay and seeing all sorts of pinkers made with a name GEM.  They go back as far as the late 1800's from a quick search.  Also, the serrated version is a more complex cutter than the Singer version.  The Singer version makes a wave of sorts when it cuts.  The GEM also makes a similar wave of sorts but inside that wave cut out is smaller cut outs.  Now I have to wonder if this is a superior version.  I like Chaly's comments about using hers for hand overcasting stitching on couture garments that don't have as much bulk.  I'll keep looking but wanted to post on these GEM units as they seem rugged and less money on eBay.

Best regards,
Mike

  I just found this incredible ISMACS article I'm still reading on pinking machines.....  http://ismacs.net/sewing_machine_articles/pinking-machine-mechanical-go-with.html   Sure sounds like Victorian Sweatshop material to me.  New stuff to learn today at the coffee shop 😉
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Mkwatts

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Reply with quote  #28 
Hello. The featherweight shop sells the straight blades. Newly made I believe. Search on their site for pinking. It will come right up.
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #29 
Hello,  I have gone to the featherweight shop and for both new and used I had to fill out an online form with my email address so that I would be "notified" when they are back in stock.  No email notification as of yet.

  We do have an industrial cutter but I'd rather leave it set up for cutting waist band pieces that are wider. 

  I want to mention my Fraser 500-1 that we have.  The knifes are interesting in that they use two O-rings so that the material is held down for the cutting edge of the knife.  What I currently have to do however is to use the number 1 blade that was able to be ordered out of Canada for almost 50 dollars (single knife) off eBay (this seller has had the knifes for a couple years on eBay and now lists almost 100 having been sold) then iron the material folded over and then run it through.  It cuts through two layers of material giving an exact cut but is very labor intensive.  Also, the design of the adjustable width piece is such that the bottom does not meet the device perfectly.  I just never yet spent much time on it and may soon.  I'm using an overlapping folder for belt loops right now but just ordered a "butterfly" type that meets in the center.   I'm always wanting to improve my belt loops as it seems the belt loops and crotches are the usual failure points.  Not getting everything too thick allows the Juki lk1900bhs bar tacker to breeze through everything but that is a heavy duty machine and it takes considerable before it's overloaded.  With some custom work my thought is to use the folder with a precision cut bias tape and insert a 12mm standard polyester tape below it and then use our Singer 212w139 compound feed lock stitch to sew it together.  Lots of interesting designs of thin 12mm tape out there and should be able to be done.

  On the belt loops I'm trying to figure out how Levis and some other high end brands have a raised center ridge on the loops.  Then there is another high end brand that uses a trade marked name for their "loop lock" heavy duty design.  As the saying goes "the devil is in the details" I'm always fascinated in how to improve such a fine detail.  Wranglers uses a pocket facing machine for theirs (we have one of those) which is a 5 thread with 2 threads in each of the two needles making two thread chain stitches and then the fifth thread is a cover stitch thread going back and forth.  I like the idea of adding a polyester 12mm tape and using a braided thread on the top thread or maybe both.  Reversing the tape to the top can allow really cool designs.  

Best regards,
Mike
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