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Seijun

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Reply with quote  #1 
I have a 1918 Singer 66 in (presumably) the original treadle cabinet, but I was surprised to see that the machine has a motor mount underneath the hand-wheel. Was Singer offering motors this far back, or was the mount added in case someone wanted to use a hand-crank? None of the treadle manuals I have looked at mention the motor mount even though it can be seen in the illustrations.
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #2 
My three from 1916 have motor bosses. Two came to me w/o cabinets, the third had been Mercury motor retrofitted, and popped into a case.
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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #3 
I believe that the attachment boss was added to the Singer 66 around 1913.

CD in Oklahoma


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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #4 
Future upgrade path...
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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorba
Future upgrade path...


All in fun, I disagree.  I think it was a current upgrade path for 1913, and not any too soon, for a hand crank attachment.  Folks wanted to hand crank their new “Twentieth Century Machine” (Singer 66) and so Singer had to come up with a way to do that (as far as I know, they didn’t make a wrap-around hand crank attachment for the 66, only the 27 and 15).

Then, later on, they probably let one of the Junior Engineers cobble together a motor bracket that would fit onto the “Hand Attachment Boss”, and put a small annoying motor on an otherwise delightful-sounding machine.

[rofl][rofl][rofl]         [wave]

CD in Oklahoma


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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #6 
Yea, yea - even a hand crank is an upgrade... [biggrin]
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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorba
Yea, yea - even a hand crank is an upgrade...


Uh-oh.  You’re making me nervous now with that come-back.  I must have caught you still in the Christmas spirit of being kind to others and all of that stuff.  Now, I have to wait and wonder when you’re going to really get me back on this “motor-no motor” sparring that has been fun (at least on my end).  LOL!

CD in Oklahoma


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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #8 
Handcrank being an upgrade from a treadle! [biggrin][tongue][rofl][sneaky]
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Farmer John

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Reply with quote  #9 
Regardless of how many smiley faces are added,  I am extremely irritated by this continuous assault of treadle powered machines.  After all, this is a vintage sm site, where almost everyone respects the historical aspect of the machines, whether powered by hand, foot or electricity.  Perhaps, enough is enough !!
John
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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #10 

People who look for "offense" will find it.

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #11 
There are advantages and dis advantages when comparing hand cranked to treadle in my experience.  Hand crank can give more punch if going through seams or heavy material.  I prefer to use my 201k hand crank when doing button holes using it's button hole attachment.  Some say it is good to teach your children on a hand crank and when my daughter wants to learn that'll likely be where I let her use her first machine. 
Treadles give both hands free and can be fast for long periods of time without tiring.  Treadles are very quiet and very relaxing as well.  I would personally choose a treadle over a hand crank unless I was going through thick work or using the button hole attachment.  All that said I have a circa 1929 Pfaff model 34 in black color on a treadle.  It has a very thick belt (3/8 or 1/4 inch diameter I can't remember which).  I have seen a pair of jeans sewn without a cinch on that treadle machine and going through seams was zero issue.  The person using it was in his 80's and it was obvious he was enjoying the use of it very much.  He has domestic treadles at his house that he uses to make clothes and jeans but he does not go over a size 16 needle on them.  My Pfaff 34 can do more than a size 16 needle and ticket 50 thread as it is essentially a Singer 31-15 with reverse on it being it is a clone of that industrial machine in most respects.  On the subject of motors.  I have a 100 year old plus White Family Rotary I will hopefully soon get in operation up in our soon to be completed tree house.  It has an akward and big motor on it that I think is a Hamilton Beach motor from memory but I am not at the house (at an airport lounge now).  This motor has a swinging mount on it so I am guessing it can be moved out of the way for treadle work but an assumption.  Definitely the electric motors were in use over a hundred years ago already but were expensive I'm certain.  Nice to see you on the thread Farmer John.  Somehow I was off the digest and missed allot of posts as a result but saw your post about your Davis NVF and how it works so well for you.  Happy New year and belated Merry Christmas.  Best regards, Mike
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