Victorian Sweatshop Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
John F

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #1 

002.jpg 
Had this machine a couple of weeks now & finally have some pictures to show. I would appreciate some advice on what is possible with this machine. Mainly about fitting a hand crank, but it is also missing a couple of parts on the bobbin winder assembly...

It’s an 1888 Singer IF. SN 8429218. Refinished late 1940s & fitted with a Hillman motor. (Plus chromed balance wheel & needle plates.) Has been well used since, but still sewed when I first plugged it in. I bought it as ‘Spares’, but I’m intending to keep it running & therefore thinking of a hand crank, if I can get one to fit. (It’s noisy via the motor, & a treadle doesn’t appeal, just on size)
008.jpg 

 It has a motor mount which may help with a hand crank. The mount is made of cast alloy, so it must have been an available part back in the day. On first sight I assumed it to be a ‘one off’ machined item, but cleaning it reveals casting marks.

003 (2).jpg 

I think it’s a fascinating machine for a chance find, with many variations over time, & it is the predecessor to the venerable 15 series. It has the beaked bobbin case, which is quite an item on its own! It’s had a hard life over a long period, & is a proper survivor, so it would be nice to keep it running in its old age?

The awful paint is also very likely to be replaced... Question here is: Do I go for safe, traditional, 'heavy' black? Or go for a more radical, opposite, 'light' white? A certain 'Iron Lady', (posted by Finnchik) elsewhere on this site, has me tempted right now.

Any comments, advice, most welcome: )
023.jpg 




__________________
John, from Gloucester UK
SM Blog: https://slantzone.blogspot.com/
0
stitchntime

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 317
Reply with quote  #2 
John,
It's a very interesting refurb.  I haven't seen one on this side of the pond yet.  I have a '79 and an '85, both in original cabinets, the '85 in good original condition.  If that motor mount replicates the motor boss found on later machines I'd think you should be able to attach a hand crank, however I have no experience with that.  The '79 I picked up had been converted to a motor but it was crudely attached to the rear of the machine by drilling and tapping through the rear access cover.
DSC07385.jpg 

At the risk of purist criticism, I think the machine is very interesting in the refurbished state, blue fish-eye paint and all.  IF machines that are in need of paint and decals aren't that uncommon here.  It's harder to find ones in good cabinets and with good original decals and paint. 
DSC06872.jpg  DSC06883.jpg 

As for function, I enjoy using my '85.  With a hand crank I bet you would have fun with it and have a very unique machine.  I don't recall ever seeing a hand crank IF.

Greg

0
ttatummm

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 236
Reply with quote  #3 
The refurbished state is historically interesting. But I have to agree with you, it is hideous aesthetically. Not only the paint, but those rectangular decals on the fiddle base.

When you mentioned painting it white, I thought "I don't know". But I took a look at that pearl white machine you mentioned, and it looks really nice. That color with details to play up that fiddle base, you would have a gorgeous machine.

__________________
Tammy

Make it sew. -- J.L. Picard
0
John F

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stitchntime
John,
It's a very interesting refurb.  I haven't seen one on this side of the pond yet.  I have a '79 and an '85, both in original cabinets, the '85 in good original condition.  If that motor mount replicates the motor boss found on later machines I'd think you should be able to attach a hand crank, however I have no experience with that.  The '79 I picked up had been converted to a motor but it was crudely attached to the rear of the machine by drilling and tapping through the rear access cover.
 

At the risk of purist criticism, I think the machine is very interesting in the refurbished state, blue fish-eye paint and all.  IF machines that are in need of paint and decals aren't that uncommon here.  It's harder to find ones in good cabinets and with good original decals and paint. 
  DSC06883.jpg 

As for function, I enjoy using my '85.  With a hand crank I bet you would have fun with it and have a very unique machine.  I don't recall ever seeing a hand crank IF.

Greg


How lovely to see your machines in their original finish, flowers & all! I do agree that they are best in their treadle bases, but mine, being the individual, odd one out perhaps, I do think a tasteful refinish would benefit the machine in its retirement: ) It'll never be 'original' again, & simply to add a motor to such a machine seems more than a little OTT in 2020. (I can say that it will never be motorised in my possession: )

I've been experimenting with a couple of hand cranks & I do think it's possible with the 'Motor Mount'. If the mount were a 1/4" thicker it would be well possible... with a slot instead of a hole in the adapter. I'll try anyway, & always have a treadle base to fall back to if it doesn't: )

I think it is more likely to get used as a 'Portable'. And, I just think it is a very cute, curvy, small machine that is attractive in its own right. The Fiddle base is what 'makes it' for me. Its long, long history of use just adds to that appeal.

__________________
John, from Gloucester UK
SM Blog: https://slantzone.blogspot.com/
0
John F

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttatummm
The refurbished state is historically interesting. But I have to agree with you, it is hideous ascetically. Not only the paint, but those rectangular decals on the fiddle base.

When you mentioned painting it white, I thought "I don't know". But I took a look at that pearl white machine you mentioned, and it looks really nice. That color with details to play up that fiddle base, you would have a gorgeous machine.


You definitely on my side here!! Thank you.
Re the refinish:
This machine is all about curves for me. The (eventual) Porceline white curves against a black/dark leather base are in my eye right now. Flower decals, if I can find them, are the 'tie in' to the original, heavy looking, black, flowered finish. White is always lighter, in this respect, so for me this is about opposites being equally attractive to a modern eye.

If it's attractive it'll be used, is my motto here: )

__________________
John, from Gloucester UK
SM Blog: https://slantzone.blogspot.com/
0
Cari-in-Oly

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,948
Reply with quote  #6 
I think it may have been refurbished later than the 40s. Was the hammer paint even available in the 40s? I don't know about the UK, but in the US when Singers were refurbished by dealers they were not allowed to use new Singer decals on them. The paperclip decals were used on the 201s and the 301s.

Cari

__________________
Olympia Washington
0
John F

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cari-in-Oly
I think it may have been refurbished later than the 40s. Was the hammer paint even available in the 40s? I don't know about the UK, but in the US when Singers were refurbished by dealers they were not allowed to use new Singer decals on them. The paperclip decals were used on the 201s and the 301s.

Cari


You may well be right there. I think the key is the date of manufacture of the Hillman Motor. May well be into the 1950s. I've not checked the motor history yet: )

Interesting point about the 'Hammered' paint finish also!
When was it introduced? I don't know. Yet! Amazing how one thing leads to another???...


__________________
John, from Gloucester UK
SM Blog: https://slantzone.blogspot.com/
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.