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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #1 
I just finished a hemstitched hem on a skirt I am making  - using the Singer hemstitcher.

It took me a while to get the hang of it and especially the confidence to use on a garment.  Prior I have used for napkins, etc.  Once you have the operation down it is not that hard.  I recommend reading and following the instructions and then once you get good results you can change your technique.

For me, I found practicing with the attachment without thread was a good test.  It's important to use fabric that will keep the hole made by the piercer.  Linen and fine shirting cotton have worked for me.  Singer recommends using tarlatan as a backing stabilizer.  I had some of this that came with my attachment and it works really well - it's hard to find now so I experimented with different stabilizers.  A medium weight tear away cotton stabilizer worked and also starching the fabric.

For my skirt I had silk organza as an underlining and I starched the hem - no other stabilizer was used. I sewed on the wrong side of the hem to allow exact stitching on the unturned hem edge.  I then repeated the hemstitching on the right side.  Because the attachment hemstitches with just one needle you have to repeat the stitching on the other side and follow your initial piercing - this is what takes practice.

The results are very acceptable to me although don't match a two needle hemstitching machine.  It's more of a true hemstitch with an actual piercer than using a wing needle.  I have seen some beautiful wing needle examples and I'll have to try this out on my slant Singers.

I replaced the old dried rubber on the feet but it worked okay before the replacement.  What really grabs and holds the fabric are the sharp teeth on the bottom of the attachment.
 Oiling and adjusting the piercer location is all I have had to do.  The cover plates are different for different machines so it is important to get a cover plate that corresponds to the machine you will be using it with.  I used mine with the  121388 throat plate on my Singer 201 with cotton 50 wt thread and size 12 microtex needle.

The photos show the hemstitcher in use and the hem on the linen skirt - right and wrong sides, a closeup of the stitching, and the underside of the attachment with an example using fine cotton shirting fabric with tarlatan backing.
singer hemstitcher.jpg  hemstitcher side.jpg  hemstitched hem.jpg  linen skirt.jpg  skiet hem wrong side.jpg  hemstitching enlarged.jpg  hemstitcher underside.jpg 



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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #2 
Thank you.

I have wondered about starch, Terial Magic, or PerfectSew Liquid Wash-away Fabric Stabilizer. Something else that I thought about was "Waste Canvas." I used some once to cross stitch a pair of jeans I was making my daughter when she was little. I was reminded of it when I found some tarlatan in my fashion aids case.

Janey

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superpickles

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Reply with quote  #3 
That is mighty cool, and a lovely finish. Can I ask how the hem holds up over time? I really can't stand mending (my hands are not strong enough for handsewing in general) so "will it last" is always my first thought.
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #4 

Quote:
Originally Posted by OurWorkbench
Thank you.

I have wondered about starch, Terial Magic, or PerfectSew Liquid Wash-away Fabric Stabilizer. Something else that I thought about was "Waste Canvas." I used some once to cross stitch a pair of jeans I was making my daughter when she was little. I was reminded of it when I found some tarlatan in my fashion aids case.

Janey


I used a clear starch (Mary Ellen's Best Press) that I would not have to wash out since I didn't want to launder my skirt to wash away any stabilizer.  I would like to try Terial Magic for my work with twin needle sewing and hemming knits and compare this with a tear away stabilizer.  I am thinking the waste canvas may be more difficult to remove than the tarlatan but I haven't looked close recently at this product.  There are some sources out there for cotton stiff tarlatan and I may order some to have on hand since it works so well and it will be less expensive than some of the tear aways.  Do you have a favorite stabilizer that you've used for such machine stitch work?
hemstitchprep.jpg 




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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by superpickles
That is mighty cool, and a lovely finish. Can I ask how the hem holds up over time? I really can't stand mending (my hands are not strong enough for handsewing in general) so "will it last" is always my first thought.


Thanks!  This is my first time using hemstitching on a garment so I can't say for sure although I've used it to make linen napkins and they are about 5 years old and have gone through a colossal amount of laundry and they are holding up fine - see photo.

I would next like to make some linen pillowcases since I'm trusting the hem will hold up as it has done for my napkins. 

napkin.jpg 

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seb58

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Reply with quote  #6 
I just received a hemstitcher attachment (I put a low bid on it for sport in the early days of auction and come what may, I end up winning the bid and having to pay almost twice as much in postage from California... Well...)
Thing is although the plate is right for the 15 machines, once the attachment is fixed, there is hardly enough room underneath to put a piece of fabric, let alone trying to fit in a hem or a double layer, is that normal?
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by seb58

Thing is although the plate is right for the 15 machines, once the attachment is fixed, there is hardly enough room underneath to put a piece of fabric, let alone trying to fit in a hem or a double layer, is that normal?



Congratulations on your win!  A great attachment to have but does take some fun practice.

Do you have the instruction manual?  I struggled with this apparently tight clearance for a while until I came upon some info in the instructions in the decorative stitch section:

"To remove the work and also when the work is being entered...." - see photo I have attached.  Basically you press backwards on the feeding fingers until the blade rises free.
If you don't have the instructions let me know and I'll photo them for you.  It helped me to run this without thread and observe the actions - when the piercer enters the fabric in relationship to needle movement and rising of feeder feet.

Once I figured it all out I don't have any problems with inserting double layers of fabric and even going over seams - which would add two more layers.  
hemstitch instructions.jpg 

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seb58

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks Chaly 😉

I do have the instruction manual but it smelled really mouldy so I put it in the freezer for a couple of days to try and kill the smell (a tip from an antique book collector), once I retrieve it and let it defrost I will peruse it and pay particular attention to that section.

I will also try it without thread and make plenty of tries on scraps before tackling on any real project 😉
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