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JRG

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Reply with quote  #1 
Recently a Singer Centennial 29K71 boot patcher followed me home.  The sewing machine was in good operating condition with good paint and decals except for a few gouges and chips.  The original treadle base was rather the worse for the wear with the cast iron table broken in two at the left front, the treadle broken sometime in the past and brazed back together to make it operable, and the pressed steel legs banged up and partially rusted.  Despite this everything worked smoothly.  Here it is before cleaning and repair.

D2D5F2B7-8409-4CBD-87C7-C001869C80C1.jpeg 

The pictures below show it after cleaning, rust removal, oiling, and treade base repair.  Repairs included screwing wood feet into the legs to keep them straight and hold them together and keep them from scarring the floor, using steel strap to bolt the two broken pieces of the table together, and repainting the table, legs, and treadle.  Except for cleaning, oiling, and a coat of wax, no restoration was done to the sewing machine itself.  I made up a detachable wood table patterned after the optional Singer wood flatbed table and a thread stand to slip over the spool pin (cross wound thread tends to unwind and wrap around the spool pin otherwise - not good).  I also replaced the truck steering wheel crank knob with a turned cocobolo knob similar to the original Singer knob (I think the original knob was of a less fancy wood).

4F512B2E-6090-4508-B124-8B26699B370F.jpeg  19E41D71-42C1-423E-B6B7-357BB0523F56.jpeg 

The machine bears serial number EF801204, one of 5000 assigned May 25, 1950. The next batch of serial numbers was assigned June 19, 1951, so this machine most likely left the factory in the first half of 1951.

E28E2734-A761-4576-AD08-AB2F49430AB6.jpeg 

Questions
The 29K71 service manual http://https://res.cloudinary.com/singer-sewing/image/upload/fl_attachment/Singer-Website-Library/outdated_product/5b87df16385a610fb5da7d8b025020ebd2d74e1a.pdf shows how to thread the regular tension assembly and on page 10 how to thread the lower tension assembly for darning. What is the difference between these two tension assemblies?  Has anyone tried darning?  How do you do it?  What stitch length do you use?  Other tricks or suggestions?

AE21DDAA-E3FB-43F9-AB72-8D7C309B1161.jpeg 

Observations 
When the presser foot is set for low lift, the maximum stitch length of this machine is 6 1/4 stitches per inch.  When set for maximum lift, the maximum stitch length increases to 5 1/2 stitches per inch.  Stitch quality is the same for either setting.  Have others observed similar behavior?

The detachable flatbed table is a great aid for sewing flat work.  With the table and a magnetic seam guide on the arm it is as easy to sew straight seams as on any other sewing machine.  I sewed a cover for the machine from upholstery vinyl without any problems.

Jim in Seattle


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Jim in Seattle
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #2 
Nice machine, and nice work!  I'm looking forward to sewing on my 29-4 using the flatbed table I made for it recently.  Should be a lot easier to control some/most projects.

I'm not surprised the lift affects the stitch length, since they're both functions of the foot.  But I don't think the 29-4 has adjustable lift, so I can't really say for sure.  Mine does about 5-1/2 stitches, which as I understand it is good for an unrestored 29-4.  There's a wear part in there somewhere that reduces max stitch length.

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JRG

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Reply with quote  #3 
Pgf,

Thank you for the kind words and good luck with your 29-4.

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Jim in Seattle
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