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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #1 
The best part of vintage machines is fixing. Shown is moisture damaged case before and after. The case also had a few dark green paint streaks. A replacement case latch part was also fabricated blank, shown before additional metal work.

The case ends were removed by wetting with damp paper towels, just enough for removal. The inner and outer veneer each have two layers. The layers were separated, dampened, and clamped between hard painted shelf boards. They were then reglued, a layer at a time.

The case was lightly sanded, paint removed with sharp blade. Original decal was preserved. Original finish sanded down to original stain. Finished with wipe-on clear satin Minwax, nylon panty hose as applicator. Green 3M abrasive pad rub between 3 coats.

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Dave in middle TN

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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #2 
Beautiful! One of the best case restorations I've seen.

Cari

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #3 
Yes, that is amazing work!  Best regards, Mike
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thank you, I have more to post on subject from other cases. Fixing severe dents, repair of handle holes.
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Dave in middle TN
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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #5 
Beautiful work on that Bentwood Case!  Fantastic appearance!
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thank you.
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Dave in middle TN
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #7 
Many thanks for sharing your work on the case.  I have two cases that need attention and the more specific information I have from others helps me to plan out my project.

Your restored case is beautiful - a testament to how we can preserve and use these wonderful vintage items that were initially crafted so well.  
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #8 
Whoa, that's remarkable.  I love your "after" look.  Now, if you have any hints on doing that restore for face lines, wrinkles, etc ([wink][smile])!
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #9 
Nice work.  But we need more pictures of the process -- you make it sound too easy.  :-)
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #10 
I have enough trouble taking before pictures. The wood is crying for first aid.

I will show more this evening about, huge dent repair, and handle hole repair.

Show are typical dents with break of veneer. The cherry case is an after, for a huge dent large enough to fit my finger thru.

The aluminum metal with boards nailed on the buck. The buck captivates the outside ,the inside is moistened locally at dent. A thumb or wooden spoon is used to for out dent. Weight to hold till dry. Might take a time or two.

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Dave in middle TN

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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #11 
I have no secrets about the work. The work is always done in small steps 5 to 30 minutes, with idle time, glue or finish dry. Idle time as little as 3 hours, or over night. Short duration steps,fit within my other activities, baby sitting, house and farm chores. Items below are multiple steps.

1. Clean base and cover with slight damp paper towel, dry and repeat at a later time. In the cleaning process identify loose joints, loose, warped, or missing veneer.

2. Remove all hardware, keep photos or notes, how it goes back. Case locks and end receivers have specific orientation.
Store in zip-lock sandwich bags, one or base, other for cover.
Clean the inlets in the wood, often filled with lint. As time permits clean, polish and lubricate hardware as necessary.

3. If base bottom damaged or base joints loose/ shifted remove nails and bottom. Delaminated bottoms with all parts can be often flattened, and glued layer at a time. 1/8" plywood can be used as replacement. Replace bottom only after joints repairs.

4. Base joints often need repair. Joints exist at 4 base corners, 4 gussets at machine corners, and two at divider between controller/accessory compartment. All joints should be flush to top. Gussets and divider are sometimes depressed.
The original glue was water soluble, if a base gets wet joints often shift, glue hardens, shift is permanent. Shifted joints improperly support machine. Base will not set flat on table. When corner joints are broken, veneer on the corners tear. Don't be concerned, as joints are glued and clamped tears typically become nearly invisible.

Shifted joints need to be loose. Moisture will melt the old glue, careful use of heat gun, will help loosen modern pva wood glue.

Gluing and clamping involves glue, many clamps, various backing boards, square to check corners, and damp paper towels for cleanup. Prior to any glueing do a clamp rehearsal. Backing boards are used between clamps and base spread pressure evenly and avoid clamp dents. In the rehearsal, verify that joints go together fully. Clamp side and ends, top side up to view correctness, the flip over and clamp base to main backing board, including clamps on divider. Often best to do gussets later.
Applying glue is a skill. The pull out valve on wood glue bottles can be used to inject glue. Open joint slighty, place slit of open nozzle over joint with fingers, and squeeze bottle. Avoid pressing the bottle down, or valve closes. It takes two hands. Experience helps figuring the correct amount of glue. Clamp end and sides. Clean up expelled glue prior to clamping on main backing board.

I have much more to write and pictures to take and load.

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Dave in middle TN

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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #12 
Very nice work indeed! Did you use hot hide glue (My favorite for this kind of work)?
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #13 
I have only used original glue residue when wetting and clamping is enough. There are times when I wish for some, but get by with pva. Is hot hide glue the brand name, or do you use it heated? Can you recommend a source?
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #14 
Pictures added, editing corrections of prior posts.
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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #15 
Hot hide glue is just that: The old style glue, purportedly from horses - comes as dried crystals. It takes a bit of prep to use, but once you try it, you'll love it. I think I got mine from a piano supply house (as I've done extensive work on my piano), not sure...

Here's an introductory article from a woodworking site: http://www.leevalley.com/en/newsletters/Woodworking/4/6/article2.htm

Your bentwood case would have pretty much definitely been made with it - that's why your rewetting and clamping technique works so well.

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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #16 
Thank you. It should help with veneer and other cosmetic work. The possibly of rework is much better too. Pva gums up the works in a permanent way.
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Dave in middle TN
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #17 
I've got some holes in a bentwood case, with the pieces that pulled out. I was wondering how to clamp to glue them back in. I get the outside clamp, but how is the inside done? Also what gauge sheet metal was used? Wood filler and then sanded to smooth the inside?

Janey

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #18 
Hello group,

  The mention of "gums up the works" makes me want to comment about glue.  The common glue available for the carpenters in the barrios here is called Stickwell.  It is pretty much universal here.  When I made butcher block for our table on the 1st story of the tree house I used it and regretted it.  When taking a belt sander to it the belts would gum up in no time.  That is when I began using epoxy with colored tint for joining lots of woodworking jobs (not all).  I can buy the grey 2 part epoxy by the gallon (actually it is two 1 gallon containers but they are not completely full) for about 50 dollars for the 2 gallon cans same size as 1 gallon paint cans.  Mix the color tint in and it goes from grey to brown.  It's super super strong bonding wood even when there is gaps as the marine epoxy is very thick unlike layup epoxy.  And it sands beautifully.  The weird thing is that when sanded it goes back to the original grey color until wetted out with anything from clear to tint it'll go to it's brown color again and stay that way.  Today we are making drawers for our stand(s) on the leather patcher machines we're focused on right now.  It is 1/2 inch marine grade plywood with tarnished brass looking hardware.  Where the edge of the plywood is we'll just smooth a layer of this brown tinted marine epoxy and sand giving the edge a consistent brown color that is smooth so it'll look good with the rest of the drawer that is going to be treated, stained, and polyurethane covered.  When doing the edges I'll know it won't have the "paint on plywood" problem where it soaks into the wood later also.  

Best regards,
Mike
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #19 
Janey,
Fitting the broken out parts back may be possible. If damage was outside in, replace part from inside. Use wet towel to slightly dampen part, it will be more flexible. Hide glue or super glue applied from inside, with single layer blue painters tape on outside. The painters tape holds part, keeps glue from leaking out. The glue applied from inside, just around joint, not enough to make mess. Not sure if metal buck will be advantage, make call after part inserted. Weights inside can be used to apply pressure. Repeated efforts of wetting and pressure overcome dent memory in wood.

The metal is aluminum roof flashing, very thin ~0.008", but does job. It comes in a roll from Lowes or Home Depot. It is good for making templates, cut easily with scissors.

I have a case with significant shipping damage, the motor pushed thru case, part shredded up. It's spare parts, can use an end for one that is missing. Can't save them all. Veneer parts can harvested for use on others. Some hardware usable.

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #20 
Hello group,

  Another thing I've started to use on the wood is that I treat with chemicals for termites and add a very small amount of stain to it when treating.  After it dries I take a bit of meadowfoam seed oil and wipe it in.  The small amount of stain doesn't do a whole lot but when I wipe it down with the meadowfoam seed oil it really looks great with the color really popping out on the grains of the wood and a nice natural mahogany look to it.  Mostly after that I then put polyurethane on it and the color is permanent at that point.  I was worried that the poly would not stick to the wood after the final wipe down with meadowfoam seed oil but had zero issues with it.  I'm not so sure if that would or would not apply to a bentwood case but this has become the standard routine for wood here.  When I did the diy butcher block on the eating table for 1st level of tree house that was repurposed American pine 2x4's from crates sent here.  I put quite a few coats of citronella tiki torch fuel and let it dry a day between coats.  It brought out a very light orange into the wood that really looked good with the pine which was followed up with polyurethane to seal the color.  We resort to allot of diy solutions here because the limited sources of supplies at the stores sometimes.  Best regards, Mike
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #21 
I want to provide more information about fixing missing wood, veneers, and finishing. Splitting those off as another topic is better. They are universal to cabinets too.
To finish this post, information on case associated hard ware, may be of help.
Case lock need cleaning and lubrication. A couple drops of sewing machine oil followed by dab of vaseline, or tri-flow grease, applied at top. It is amazing how easy yet crisp locks work. Locks that have been forced with a crowbar can be straightened, and staked back together. Receivers are often bent too, and should be straightened. Locks are installed with the key depression out. Key eyelets are often missing. Bememo 1/4" 200 sets of 4 color, found on Amazon. The antique brass is perfect match. It is necessary on some installations to enlarge the id some, with large Philips screwdriver.
Rubber machine pads are sometimes missing, or gooey from oil. Garage door seal can be cut with scissors. Original base feet are often missing, or too hard to function. I replace with more modern ones, they work excellent.
The last thing is case hinges. Top of hinges should be flush to case. They are often depressed. Washer shims made from card stock or business cards, are added as necessary.
Ask away if you have questions.

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Dave in middle TN

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Tjshannon

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Reply with quote  #22 
I have ventured to refinish a bentwood case that the entire finish came off with the slightest sanding. I am applying a new decal because their was very little left of the original. I thought that the finish on these cases were shellac. Why did you and others that I have read, use polyurethane finish? I think it is important to use the right products but I struggle with figuring out what type is the best. I’m new at this and any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #23 
I will do my best to explain why I use polyurethane, however it is not my intent to convince you to use it.  The only experience I have with lacquer and shellac is the appearance after a case is 140 to 60 years old.  The case condition range from charred, sticky, cloudy, opaque, crazed, bare, abraded, stained, warped  and sometimes a combination of all those. I can only guess what conditions and substances that result in damage.  Seems water, oils, abrasion, cleaning products may be detrimental to original finish.  When sanding original finish regardless of age, abrasion is easy, dust is most often yellow,  and fluffy.  By removing, or thinning original finish, transparency improves, adverse smell and contaminants also removed.

Sanding off old finish, without cutting into original stain and wood is my goal.  Then simply applying polyurethane to seal and protect, achieves my desired appearance and durability.  Polyurethane seems to go over any finish. I find polyurethane easy to work with. Polyurethane is also tolerant to water, oils, abrasion and most cleaning products.

Not sure if you have seen my most recent case restoration. https://www.victoriansweatshop.com/post/another-bentwood-case-restoration-10455166?highlight=bentwood&pid=1310997065

I forgot to say about decal replacement.  The surface needs to be smooth (wood grain filled).  Then protective finish over top, w/sanding and repeats, if outline needs to be invisible.  The last decal I used needed water based poly finish as protective coat.  I used it, but it is difficult to work with.  It is milky and sticky going on, requires natural brush.



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Dave in middle TN
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