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jennasquiltn

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Hi
My DH bought a Singer Stylist 534 at an estate auction yesterday, thankfully it was cheap.  Anyway, it is cabinet mounted and seemed fine until I tried to use it.  The feed dogs were not moving so I got my oldest son to take it apart and see what was wrong.  Apparently a pen had gotten down in the area under the bed of the machine and broke to gear the makes the feed dogs work.  My questions are...is it fixable and if so is the machine worth the trouble.  It would be fixed up for resale if fixable.  Here is a picture of the broken gear.
DSCF0233.jpg 
And, can anyone tell me what this thing is and how to use it?  That is a cutting blade at the top.
DSCF0234.jpg 
Thanks!

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khogue

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 I believe the tool is a Singercraft rug maker. 
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Cari-in-Oly

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Yes the gears are available - http://store.tandtrepair.com/sist51351853.html

As for whether the machine is worth the repair, that's up to you. It's not a particularly valuable or collectible machine, but any machine that will run, should run as far as I'm concerned.

The tool is a Singercraft Guide. I have one somewhere but I've never played with it and I'm not overly sure exactly what it's good for either. You can make doll hair and rugs, among other things, that much I remember.

Cari

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Just4Him1204

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Reply with quote  #4 
I have one with a manual.  I will scan it as soon as I can and send it to Steve.

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jennasquiltn

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Is the manual for the machine or the tool?  I was able to download a manual for the machine.

Thanks for the help everyone.

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MJTX

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Here's a video of James Rogers using the singer craft guide to make fringe. Interesting tool, had never heard of it before.

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White Rotary Treadle, Singer 15-88, 15-91, 127, 99K, 223, 306K, 403, 404, Dressmaker 2400, White 445 & 967, Nelco SZ-207, Kenmore 158.840, Monarch 15 clone, Foley's 910.
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jennasquiltn

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Reply with quote  #7 

That was interesting.  His is different, it does not have the blade like mine, but still very helpful.

Thank you.

 

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just4Him1204
I have one with a manual.  I will scan it as soon as I can and send it to Steve.



They are both posted here
http://www.victoriansweatshop.com/post/singercraft-manual-and-instruction-sheet-10079965

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OurWorkbench

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Thank you, Just4Him1204 and SteveH. Years ago, before I got the extensions, I did a lion applique and made the mane with the Singercraft guide. Some day I'd like to make a doll afghan with the Guide.

Janey

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jennasquiltn

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Thank you so much Just4Him1204 and Steve.
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susieQ

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Reply with quote  #11 
Singer 534 is one of the dreaded Plastic Series machines.  Sure, you can replace all the plastic gears; many, but not all are still available.  Hopefully they are made of better materials than the early ones.  Use only synthetic grease on these gears.  But you have to ask yourself if you can expect to break even on parts and labor to bring it back to life.
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jennasquiltn

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Reply with quote  #12 
I have no intention on replacing all the plastic gears, just the one that is broken.  It's not a machine I plan to keep so I'm not going to go through a lot of hard work.  DH only paid $5 for the machine and cabinet so I think we can expect to at least get that much out of it selling it as is.
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #13 
I have both the Singer 538 free arm with the interchangeable cams, plus the 518 flat bed - same as the free arm 538, plus the operator's manuals and each machine has a case, attachments, etc. These are sort of the low shank version of the features found on the Touch & Sew 750, but not as full-functioned. Still, a nice version if you like low shank and flat cams. The 534 is the same as the 538, but only has the built in stitches, so it's not as desirable as the higher 538 or 518 (flat bed) versions, but still a decent machine when in good operating condition.

From the looks of the gears, they are either original orange plastic (read "brittle") plastic, of the sort I have seen in  a Singer 353 Genie, or have been oiled badly and ruined (if nylon).

Replacement gears are usually nylon and a full set would run about twenty bucks, on average. I have the service manual in my files. I forget where I downloaded it but can share it if you need it.

Personally, I have learned not to hate the newer machines any more than I hate the new cars. but just accept them for what they are- what came after "the good old days". The design, looks and operation of these machines are pleasant and fulfilling, if you can get your head around the fact that they are plastic. Treat them gently and take care of them and they will be pleasant and useful. Some are even good eye candy, and I personally like the looks of the 518 and 538, assuming the plastic parts haven't yellowed badly from being exposed to too much sunlight. (Some of that can be bleached, but that's another subject.)

For a sewing machine junkie like me, I found them an interesting repair project and not any more difficult to work on than the Singer 700 series Touch & Sew machines. The 518, 534 and 538 all take the plastic class 66 drop in bobbins, of course, and are standard low shank. If you plan to sell it later, it may not bring more than you have in it. But if you get it fixed and decide to use it, that's another matter. I have obtained repairable machines just for the hobby of fixing them, trying them out and having some fun with them. To that end, they were worthwhile.

-Bruce,
Bremerton, WA

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #14 
As far as the Singercraft Guide goes, be aware that there are extensions sets for them (hard to find) so you can make wider fringe, ribbons or whatever, plus there are a variety of different heads on them, some quite collectible (and expensive!). These really are useful for a variety of craft and sewing projects. Wife and I have at least half a dozen - so far. Look them up online, on eBay, Etsy and Bonanza and you will see a lot of them.

-Bruce,
Bremerton, WA
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #15 
Bruce that was a very thoughtful reply to which I can only add this - the original gears couldn't have been that bad, they lasted somewhere in the range of 50-60 years. The new gears being made of better materials will keep the machine operating for at least another 50-60 years, give or take. So while there may not be immediate $$ profit for you to fix it, to me the thought of it being able to do its job for another lifetime would be worth it to me. I have about 6 Japanese machines that I refuse to part out because I know eventually someone's gonna replicate the parts they need, and by then maybe I'll have the skills to do it!

Cari

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #16 
Cari-

Good luck with the restoration. There are a lot of generic parts that will work in a lot of the Japanese machines. I just repaired a zigzag cam in a Dressmaker 2000 that was made for a Kenmore sewing machine, a common part on eBay and others. It fit well and replaced the broken nylon gear with one of bronze. It's cheap enough to get the gears for the 534, and the work is not hard. The sooner the better, as the future is not always encouraging. In my case, I'm not getting any younger and my stable is pretty much full so I concentrate on what I have, spending my browsing time looking for what I need for what I already have. Sometimes a trip to my shed and shelves is like a new find, since some of my machines have not been dealt with for quite a while, and some were purchased as future projects and never dealt with at all. So, I keep busy, but I really need to downsize....! I think once you get the 534 done you will like it.


- Bruce,
Bremerton, WA
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #17 
Bruce I'm not the one with the 534 I'm just advocating for fixing it lol. Did you used to go to the TOGAs in Ballard? I think I've met you before. I went to all but one of the last few there. I'm the crazy Brother lovin' gal, and Dick always managed to have one to give to me.

Cari

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #18 
No, I have never been to a TOGA, and only been to one sewing machine show in Lacey, last Fall. I generally don't get out much and not planning to do any this year, either.

- Bruce,
Bremerton, WA
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #19 
Well then I met you at the Jamboree in Lacey. I had the little 3/4 size long shuttle zigzag machine, I sat with Rinae who had the electric W&G.

Cari

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #20 
Yes, I remember and can look you up in the photos. I was the old guy with the old Jones Serpentine and New National hand cranks. That was the only event I ever went to.

-Bruce,
Bremerton, WA
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