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Rocketeer

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi Everyone!

I think this will be the right forum for this, because it'll be a project I'll need encouragement and advice on for the next few weeks to months. There are other sites that are maybe less technical, and some sites that are perhaps a bit more puritanical where Certain Things Shall Not Be Discussed (though I bet they'll still be a good resource for some technical help) so I think this forum is a nice inbetween...

Since I let vintage Singers take over much of my creative energy, I was able to do a complete teardown and rebuild of my 500A with the help of AndyTube. I would love to blog about this or even make videos like Andy does, but every time I've attempted these activities, I feel like a 90-year-old grandpa who can't program the VCR and I give up. So I'll settle for the occasional post and hopefully-rare cry for help, and hope for a good time!

My goal is not showroom-new, but showroom-functional. I'm not afraid to replace parts that are in bad shape and mix my own colors for touch-up paint.

I still wonder why my 319 has the 306 bobbin case 105032 and holder 105033 installed. One of the items on my list will be changing this back to the more proper 319 case and holder 173058/173059. I'm still curious about anyone's theory as to why I'd find the 306 parts installed on my machine.

The restoration target is in the back/to the right. The other is a parts machine... : )

IMG_9284.jpg 

IMG_9285.jpg

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #2 
cool!


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Threadedchaos

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Reply with quote  #3 
If u look at the 306 case it's got a larger opening where the needle goes through. This is essentially the same modification done to the 319 to allow for standard needles. Also the 319 has a second pin that sticks out on the rotary assembly that lines up with a slot on the case. The 306 is a more adaptable system compared to the 319 using wider range of cases. I've even considered doing the same change to my 319. I can only assume either this was an extra part done at the factory due to low inventory, or later on by the previous owner.
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Rocketeer

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Thanks Steve! And Threadedchaos-- I had wondered this but was told firmly "no" by Bruce (JonesHand52) -- and I believe him. Looking closely at the 306-type bobbin case, I still don't think it's quite wide enough to be able to prevent strikes from a widely careening zig zagging 15x1 needle.
 
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Rocketeer

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hi gang!
I believe I will be able to figure this out, but wanted to poll the group because I bet at least one person has experience with rewiring. One of the things I'd like to do for my 319 is to liberate it from being permanently tied to the foot pedal, so I don't have to bundle it up and store it in the case, risking wear and tear on the finish of the machine and the pedal -- they're both in pretty great shape. 
The challenge comes in the design of all the detachable foot pedals -- needing a plug for the wall and a plug for the machine along wires that are long enough to allow the pedal to rest on the floor betweent the two. 
I think I've got enough wiring, and I finally discovered an example, albeit with a non-ideal differently-colored hub and plug. If anyone has experience with getting this kind of arrangement together, I'd love to hear about it!

An example of a permanently-attached foot pedal, with the remainder not pictured being the plug that fits the hub and connects it to the wall outlet -- you can see the cord from the pedal goes around and is attached to the back of the power hub. 
singer 319 attached foot pedal 1.jpg 
Now, examples I found of a foot pedal that contains both the wall plug and a plug for the hub:
singer 319 detachable foot pedal 1.jpg 
singer 319 detachable foot pedal 2.jpg 

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #6 
So, your machine doesn't have the three-pin connector on the end?  Adding one is the only practical way of modularizing a machine that has a lamp.  (When there's no lamp, I just give the machine a little pigtail of an electric cord, and give the controllers a long cords to both the machine and the wall.)

The problem will be whether or not the existing wires to the lamp and motor, which are presumably terminated inside somewhere, are long enough to reach the new plug you'll mount on the outside.  If not, you'll need to lengthen them.

Have you considered keeping your foot controller and cord in a bag after you wrapt them up?  It'll protect the machine, and be a lot less work.  ;-)

paul

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Rocketeer

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hi Paul, thanks so much for the input-- my machine looks like the first picture. It has the three-pin female connector, and to that are attached the light, motor, and foot pedal. There is a power cord with a 3-pin male connector and a plug for the wall. I'm essentially hoping to "jump" the foot pedal onto this cord and splice them, so the foot pedal will essentially be removable along with the power cord. 
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #8 
Oh!  I see.  I wonder why they did it that way.  The Featherweight, for instance, is set up just as you want it:  there are no wires on the machine head, only the plug, and the mating (female) plug has two wires connected to it -- one to the wall, the other to the controller.

I'm sure you can do what you want, probably without much trouble.  Simply remove the controller wires from the back of the male plug on the machine, and attach them to the same pins inside the shell of the detachable female plug.  The only issue might be that there's not a lot of room in there, and you'll have two wires on one of the pins.  I've only rewired one or two of those, and I was successful, but I'll bet someone else here has tips, or good pictures, or both, which might help.

paul

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Rocketeer

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks again Paul! That is what I was thinking, just wanted to make sure I wasn't crazy!
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #10 
When you're adding the wires inside the shell on the cord, look closely at the brass pieces.  I don't recall the details, but I'm pretty sure there's a little notch in the brass that helps with routing the twisted wire under the nut.  I missed it the first time I did it.  Doesn't help much -- just a little.

paul

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #11 
I have a 319 that the motor was replaced and they hard wired the controller to the back of the plug.  I will try to get a picture of it.  As it is wired, I could use either the attached controller or one like is shown with the controller to the machine plug to the electric outlet plug.

Janey

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Threadedchaos

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Reply with quote  #12 
Yes both the Featherweight and the 201 were wired this way. the female plug has a larger opening for the wires to go thru. There are some special euro connectors that have the wires horizontally at both ends, which makes more sense as it puts much less strain on the wires. That molded bakelite resembled the more modern shape of the 301, 401 connectors. I modified one of the standard ones by drilling a hole on the side so one wire came out the back and to the wall and the normal top wire went to the pedal. 
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Christy

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Reply with quote  #13 
I found a Featherweight where I did some re-wire on and took a few pics.  This one is from when I had just opened it up and didn't love the way it looked.  I don't have one for after I did the work though. DSC_0926 (700 x 465).jpg 
The small brass connectors unscrew and there is a slot to lead the wires down.  The power is routed to the two outer connectors and the foot controller leads go to the center and the side.


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Threadedchaos

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Reply with quote  #14 
wireing diagram.jpeg 
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #15 
Here are the pictures of my 319 wiring & motor.

Original
_319originalmotor.jpg 

_319originalwiring.jpg
The wire to the left goes to the controller.

Since I had a molded electric cord and not one that I could take apart and put the controller wire in, it was rewired like this.  Like I said earlier when using a different plug with electric plug and controller (from featherweight, I think), I could use either controller.

This is how it is now.

_319currentmotorwiring.jpg

_319currentwiring.jpg   
I don't know if this will help or not.

Janey


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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threadedchaos
Yes both the Featherweight and the 201 were wired this way. the female plug has a larger opening for the wires to go thru. There are some special euro connectors that have the wires horizontally at both ends, which makes more sense as it puts much less strain on the wires. That molded bakelite resembled the more modern shape of the 301, 401 connectors. I modified one of the standard ones by drilling a hole on the side so one wire came out the back and to the wall and the normal top wire went to the pedal. 


Some of the 301s were also wired this way.

Cari

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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #17 
Check out YouTube.  I saw at least one video there showing how to dye power cords.  You may be able to match the color of the original that way.
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victrola

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threadedchaos
wireing diagram.jpeg 


Rocketter, I am pretty sure I did this once for a 15-91, to convert it from cabinet-style wiring (what you have) to portable-style wiring (what you want).

I think this kind of wiring diagram you see above is key. There are others online that also show the colours of the three pins in the terminal (red, black, yellow). Rocketeer, the image above is what you want to end up with, with the controller attached to the "Three pin terminal (female)" instead of right now  when I think it would be wired to the "three pin terminal (male)". Hopefully you have the terminals that can be disassembled. You would take apart the male terminal, remove the wires for the controller (pedal), reassemble the male terminal. Then disassemble the female terminal, add in the wires for the controller, and reassemble.

As you disassemble and reassemble, take note of which colours for which wires. If you wire it wrong, you can end up with a light fixture that is controlled by the pedal, and a motor that is always on at full speed :-) so just to be sure, when you put it all back together and plug it back in for the first time, be prepared for hte machine to sew away at full speed, unplug if necessary, and redo.

Hope this helps!
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In Stitches

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Reply with quote  #19 
The 306 used two different hook assemblies during it's production, one without a pin that uses the same bobbin case as a 206, and the pinned version also seen on the 319... which only had the pinned hook as far as I know.

It is conceivable that the hook in the 319 was swapped and this should cause no issues, I upgrade all my machines with a new bobbin case that allows 15 by 1 needles to be used and have sold hundreds of modified cases through our shop.
 
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Rocketeer

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by victrola


Rocketter, I am pretty sure I did this once for a 15-91, to convert it from cabinet-style wiring (what you have) to portable-style wiring (what you want).

[clipped]

As you disassemble and reassemble, take note of which colours for which wires. If you wire it wrong, you can end up with a light fixture that is controlled by the pedal, and a motor that is always on at full speed :-) so just to be sure, when you put it all back together and plug it back in for the first time, be prepared for hte machine to sew away at full speed, unplug if necessary, and redo.

Hope this helps!



Thank you so much victrola!!! That is totally what I need and so good of you to share. Hahaha, the notion of a light switched on by the foot pedal is hilarious!


Quote:
Originally Posted by In Stitches
The 306 used two different hook assemblies during it's production, one without a pin that uses the same bobbin case as a 206, and the pinned version also seen on the 319... which only had the pinned hook as far as I know.

It is conceivable that the hook in the 319 was swapped and this should cause no issues, I upgrade all my machines with a new bobbin case that allows 15 by 1 needles to be used and have sold hundreds of modified cases through our shop.
 



Thanks for the input Keith. It looks like the bobbin case holder must have been replaced on my to-be-refurbished 319, with the two-pins-at-12-oclock version that takes the open-topped bobbin case. Sadly it did not come with a bobbin case, but I have been able to rectify that, and will most likely refit the machine with the more "native" version.
I also have amassed hopefully enough 206x13 needles to keep me up and running for a long time! I'm a bit of a purist with vintage machines (I even try to avoid 3rd party parts, though I compromised to add some Schmetz needles to my stock), but I'm also definitely not against the modifications that allow for 15x1 needles on these machines. Anything to keep em running to their full potential!

Matt
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