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videre

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello all,

First, thank you for the wealth of information on this forum board.  This is my first post, but I made liberal use of the recommendations and information over the past three weeks as I worked on cleaning up my machine and adjusting things (and, of course, cleaning more things I'd missed the first time!).  The serial number is for a 1906 production date in the Montreal factory and the hand crank seems to be original to the machine, which is good because our small apartment has absolutely no room for a treadle table or, as my husband notes, a decorative sewing machine (i.e. this needs to be a working machine).

I'm left with a handful of questions that I couldn't find answers to with any amount of online searching.  I'm guessing this is because the older style of hand crank that doesn't mount directly to the body was made for such a limited period of time.

1. I generally have everything running smoothly with one exception.  The first couple of turns of the machine with the hand crank are noticeably stiff if it's been sitting for more than a day.  Nothing is sticking, there's no need to force movement, and after those first couple of rotations it goes back to everything moving very freely -- it's just a bit stiff at first.  The crank itself is not the problem as that always turns freely when disengaged, but something about the interaction of the crank and machine seems to need a tiny warm-up period.  Is this something I should accept as normal, something that will resolve itself with regular use (the machine had sat around for a while before I got it), or is there something I might have overlooked that needs to be addressed?

2.  The hand crank came with a disintegrating piece of rubber that sat between the bushing and the belt-guard portion of the crank.  The parts list indicates that the crank originally would have come with a leather sleeve but provides no information as to thickness or dimensions.  Not having any leather on hand, I've tried a new piece of rubber as a buffer, but this seemed to make the slight stiffness mentioned above worse and at the moment there's nothing there.  Does anyone have information about the necessity of this leather sleeve and/or what the dimensions would have been?  Or even if I'm making a wrong assumption about the purpose of this sleeve?

3.  Finally, at least for now, should I worry about the chipping on the front edge of the bed?  I'm not concerned with the aesthetics as I want a machine that shows its past, but don't want to inadvertently do damage.  There's no flaking or loose edges, just a handful of places where the finish is missing along the edge.

Thank you in advance for any help and, as I said, I appreciate the knowledge already shared so freely.  I wouldn't have been willing to undertake a project of this nature without the information available.

IMG_0358.jpg  IMG_0359.jpg 

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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #2 
Beautiful machine! That's an uncommon handcrank.
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Lori in Wisconsin
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #3 
Awesome machine, Very rare handcrank!

As far as the movement hesitation, every single place where metal to metal contact with movement occurs, required a drop of oil.  I am sure there is some little place (probably underneath or in the head assembly) that is being missed.  Patience and persistence pays off.

Welcome to the forum!

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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #4 
Welcome and great machine!   What the others said:  That's a rare handcrank and I'm pretty sure, equally rare bobbin winder.

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videre

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks.  I was pleased when this came up for sale locally just as I was starting to think more seriously about obtaining a machine and a new project.  The timing seemed right and, while a 3/4 machine would have been slightly more practical, this was in half-decent condition and had everything else I was looking for so I couldn't pass it up.  I knew this style of crank was less common than the one that mounts to the body, but I didn't realize it was particularly uncommon either.

I'll check it again following the oiling diagram to make sure there's nothing in need of a drop more oil, but I had almost everything apart at one point or another except the arm shaft and the arm rock shaft and I tried to make sure I was oiling everything as the pieces went together again.  The hole where the belt guard would screw into the bushing for a treadle machine was gunked up to the point where I thought it was missing at first, so I did wonder if there could still be a bit of debris working its way out from there.  Maybe I'll check that again too.
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #6 
That handcrank is uncommon because it predates the common availability of the motor/handcrank mounting boss on the right side of the machine's pillar.  In order to add a handcrank to a machine head designed to be treadled, they had to get a bit imaginative with the mounting.

paul

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