Victorian Sweatshop Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
ttatummm

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 245
Reply with quote  #1 
I picked up a Singer 101 in a #40 cabinet on Sunday.  The machine was completely frozen, but I've read many a tale about folks getting frozen machines running great, so I thought I can deal with this.  What really gave me pause was the cast iron was broken where one one the hinge pins attach.  I didn't know if there was any way to get this machine to fit back in the cabinet properly.  But I really want a 101 and her decals are very nice (I'm a sucker for good decals), so I got her.
XQb0BOa%Sy+0DgI1g5hRwg.jpg 
When I got home that evening, I cleaned the dust and lint out, oiled her and let her sit overnight. Next morning started doing some research.  Check Jim's blog (Steel Sewing) because I know he has restored a few of these machines and checked posts here. I opened up the balance wheel, ok . . . this is different.  Fortunately I had found an adjusters manual attached to a post here and figured out how it worked and put it back together.  I pulled the motor so I could get a look at the gears behind it. At this point the upper assembly moved the tiniest bit, but the gears in the bottom not at all.  I can rock the balance wheel just a bit (about a 1/4" arc). So went and got some PB Blaster.  Honestly, I'm not sure why the machine is seized, there was a fair amount of dust and lint, but I have had machines with a lot more.  There is a lot of thick, gunky, dirty grease, but it is not hard.  I can't find any thing stuck in the gears.

A tangential question, I realize I don't know the names of the internal components, can someone direct me to a good resource for this?

By the end of the day, after spraying the three sets of gears with PB Blaster, rocking the balance wheel occasionally, and oiling again, not much change except there is the tiniest bit of movement in the two bottom set of gears.  I do mean tiny, barely perceptible, but before there was absolutely none.  I've read about unfreezing machines, but have never had a machine that was completely frozen, so any suggestions would be appreciated.

Now on to the second problem.  
eRiHGtD3QrelZkc+MFwo5A.jpg 
Is there any thing that can be done to make this machine fit properly back in the cabinet?

Not sure that I would have taken on a project like this if I didn't know that I could come to this site and draw on the knowledge of all the wonderful people here.  I wonder how many machines have been saved as a direct result of VSS.

Tammy


__________________
Tammy

Make it sew. -- J.L. Picard
0
WI Lori

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,344
Reply with quote  #2 
Tammy, your 101 can be saved! My guess would be bobbin gear is causing the issue. Design flaw with the lint source directly above. I have one, now free, same thing, a wee bit if movement above, none below.

I enlisted Farmer John's help on this, so we met in the middle of WI. A palm torch, heat applied where the rod comes through the casting, then a dab, literally a dab of kerosene, applied as that rod cools. Kerosene gets drawn in. Wiggle that wheel. Repeat, repeat. And it was free.
Oil gear, repeat frequently to be sure it stays free. Mine took 2 or 3 oil applications at the gears, that night, and the next 2 days, once each.

Farmer John, please clarify if I didn't state that process correctly, and to shed light on how long each palm torch application lasted.

__________________
Lori in Wisconsin
0
Chaly

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 901
Reply with quote  #3 
Tammy,

Congratulations on your 101!  You're certain to have a lot of fun with your adventure.

The 101 I'm working on now was frozen at first and took about 3 days to get everything moving.  I had a similar problem to Lori's - the bottom gears.  I just kept at it - cleaning and oiling and moving and eventually it all came loose and free.  I removed everything possible to help with the cleaning and oiling - the hook the the bobbin case I think is important to remove also.

Your's looks in beautiful condition from the outside and I'm sure you'll be able to get her to spin.  

I can't tell from your photo how much is broken off the pin support -I'm sure there's a way to add back support so you can put back in a cabinet - Sorry, I have not done this fix before.
0
ColoradoJim

Member
Registered:
Posts: 36
Reply with quote  #4 
Do you have the other part of the broken hinge pin mount? If so, you can JB Weld it back together as long as you grease the screw that fits in there. There is a YouTube video that pretty much fits your exact situation. I would suggest finding a different screw that fits those threads so that the repair does not require the sewing machine be mounted to the table. While the JB Weld is curing occasionally rotate the heavily greased screw so it is not frozen in place.



I am not sure what you would have to do if you do not have the rest of the broken hinge pin mount. One thought is to use modeling clay to create a mold of the missing section and run a screw through it. Unscrew it and place a large glob of silicone caulking to completely surround just the the section of the recreated missing pin mount. When it hardens, slice the glob in half and remove the modeling clay. Put both halves back together and pour JB Weld into the empty cavity after making a small whole to allow filling. Once it cures, remove the JB Weld section and JB Weld it on to the cast iron part of the pin mount. Take another heavily greased thread and rotate occasionally while the whole assembly cures. Pretty much an easier version of the lost wax process for casting metal parts. Not sure if this would actually work, depends on whether the modeling clay stays in shape and whether the silicone stays the same size, not expanding or shrinking. You can buy special modeling clay that will not shrink and it hardens after a while after mixing two clay types together much like an epoxy.

I recently had to repair a broken hand crank assembly that was broken right across the threads of the bracket mount attached to the gear cover. Part of the gear cover was broken across the threads as well as the lower half of the bracket near where it attaches to the mounting bracket on the arm. A tricky repair that required total disassembly of the hand crank attachment. I heavily greased the threads while it was curing. I put it back together and after I did some other machine repairs it sews well.

As the hinge pin mount is not moving around there is no stress on any repair besides the weight of the sewing machine. So it should hold up ok once that broken hinge pin is repaired.



0
ttatummm

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 245
Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks everyone for the input, it helps to have to have confirmation that the machine can be put right again.  When I went to see the machine and found out the things that were wrong with it, I thought sure I can fix that.  That is in part what drew me to this hobby, obsession, pursuit, I'm not sure what to call it. I loved the idea that I could make these remarkable machines run again, rather than have them disposed of.  But then I started to wonder if I bitten off more than I could chew.

Lori & Chaly your input on where the problem may lie is helpful.  I do think that I need to remove the hook and bobbin case to gain better access.  I'm still a little leery about removing some parts.  But when I first started, I found motors and electrical intimidating, now a motor needs rewiring, no problem.  So, I'll keep working on it and if I don't make any head way, I'll see if I can get more details on the procedure that you mentioned Lori.

Jim, I don't have the other half of hinge pin mount.  I saw that YouTube video, but without the other half of the mount wasn't sure of what I could do. But you are right, since the top half of the mount is what is supporting the weight of the machine, I just need a way of securing the hinge pin.  It is just going to take a little brain storming and playing around with it.

Tammy

__________________
Tammy

Make it sew. -- J.L. Picard
0
pgf

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,228
Reply with quote  #6 
Are you sure you need to do anything at all to that broken casting?  From the picture, it seems the pin will go in far enough so that the tip of the pin is completely surrounded by iron.  It feels to me like that should be all that's necessary, since as you say, the force is downard.  If it's not quite enough pin for the machine to stay on it securely, and there's enough depth to allow it, you might be able to find/make/modify a hinge with a longer pin.
__________________
My machines: http://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/by-age
0
ttatummm

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 245
Reply with quote  #7 
The problem is with the bottom of the hinge pin mount gone there is no way to secure the hinge pin and the machine wants to slide off the pin when you raise or lower it.  I think there should be a way to secure the hinge pin, I just have to get creative.  I'll turn my brain to it, after I get the machine to turn.

Tammy

__________________
Tammy

Make it sew. -- J.L. Picard
0
Cari-in-Oly

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,957
Reply with quote  #8 
You could always just leave it up in the cabinet and make a cover for it.

Cari

__________________
Olympia Washington
0
pgf

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,228
Reply with quote  #9 
Right.  Tammy, I was assuming from what you and Jim were saying about the bottom half not being needed to support the weight of the machine that it would never be folded into a cabinet.  I think that doing a repair that would hold the weight of the hanging machine would be difficult.

I'd embrace the fact that the 101 is perhaps the prettiest electric machine Singer ever made, and resolve to display it prominently...    in a non-folding cabinet.

paul
p.s.  Oh -- I just skimmed the video -- yes, I'd class that as "difficult".  :-)  He also had more of the original threads left.  But he did a good job.


__________________
My machines: http://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/by-age
0
ttatummm

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 245
Reply with quote  #10 
Yes, having the machine on display all the time would not be much of a hardship.  Maybe I should keep eye out for a combination table.  But part of me really wants to have everything functioning the way it should.  I've got the beginning of a idea, when I flesh it out, I'll post it to see if you guys can shoot it down or offer improvements.

But first things first, got to get this machine running.

__________________
Tammy

Make it sew. -- J.L. Picard
0
ttatummm

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 245
Reply with quote  #11 
Yay! we have movement.  I moved the 101 out to the sunroom this morning where it is warmer and there is better ventilation.  Kept at the area that you guys said was the likely culprit with the PB Blaster and added a hair dryer to the mix and finally it actually moved, very stiff at first.  But it was so nice to seem the gears turn.

Cleaned it like crazy, oil, penetrating lubricant, brushes, a bamboo skewer, rags, you name it.  I find this fiddly, minute work oddly satisfying.  I wish my house was half as clean as my sewing machines.  Anyway she moves as smooth as silk now.  One finger on the balance wheel and she spins, and spins, and spins.

Guess I can turn my attention to the motor now.  Thanks for the advice.

Tammy

__________________
Tammy

Make it sew. -- J.L. Picard
0
SteveH-VSS

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 5,178
Reply with quote  #12 
Congrats!!  It's always good to remember that they took decades to get dirty, taking a lot of time to undo all of that is ok.
__________________
Antioch, California
0
Jim/Steelsewing

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,401
Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttatummm
One finger on the balance wheel and she spins, and spins, and spins.


I love it when plan comes together...
Congrats Tammy. Looks like maybe anther one has been saved!

If anyone is still looking for a 101:

There's this seriously overpriced beauty in North Kingston Rhode Island.

A steal of a 101 -in a combo table- in Huntington, Indiana.

Taking offers for this post '25 model in Silver Spring, Maryland

Hundred dollar early table in Davidson Michigan

$75 for a decent looking one in Gastonia North Carolina

1930-1932 in QA table listed now for 25 weeks in Richmond Hill, Georgia

Make an offer for this one in Brookville, PA

The one I'd love to have in Rochester, New York...

Still available in Princeton, Illinois.

*not that I keep track of these things, or that finding 101's a good home has become a mission in my life... but they are certainly far lesser known than so many other Singer models. Not that all Sewing machines with a lack of notoriety should be collected, but in this case 101's continue to show themselves as a little gem in the rough. They're sort of sitting on the edge of 'soon to be discovered' - so better get yours now! =)






__________________
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
0
SteveH-VSS

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 5,178
Reply with quote  #14 
I am going to see if that Rochester one is available still.  Too new, but i want to play with one.  convertibles are cool.  my mom is looking for a road trip...
__________________
Antioch, California
0
Chaly

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 901
Reply with quote  #15 
Jim - thanks for posting all these 101 machines.  I always appreciate your information and it's fun to see them and their condition, etc.  From what I can tell, the 101s are out there but a lot of folks don't recognize them for what they are - although this could be changing with all the info easily accessed now online.  They are usually major project machines, but I think as we both can attest - well worth the time.  After now having and using my 101 for about a year I've conclude that this is my all time favorite vintage machine for sewing.  I will take a 101 even over a 201.  So, I am seriously considering rehoming my three 201s.

Steve - Nice to hear you may have a 101 to play with - hope it's still available for you.
0
SteveH-VSS

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 5,178
Reply with quote  #16 
It is. I'm confirming tomorrow morning that my mom is willing to make the drive to Rochester and when she'd be willing to do it. Once that detail is confirmed, assuming everything's a go, I'll be paying for it tomorrow afternoon
__________________
Antioch, California
0
SteveH-VSS

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 5,178
Reply with quote  #17 
And Jim, when I'm done cleaning it and having fun with it I'll let you know and we will see if you're ready to have it...

Hehehe

__________________
Antioch, California
0
ttatummm

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 245
Reply with quote  #18 
Steve, that combination table is cool.

Chaly, glad to hear that you like the 101's so much. Can't wait to get mine running.  After I got mine unstuck, I just sat there spinning it over and over.  The motor wasn't connected, but couldn't believe how smooth it was.  I think I'm going to like this machine.

Tammy

__________________
Tammy

Make it sew. -- J.L. Picard
0
Jim/Steelsewing

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,401
Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS
And Jim, when I'm done cleaning it and having fun with it I'll let you know and we will see if you're ready to have it...

Hehehe


Would be more than happy to do that. Rochester is just a wee bit of a drive from here (4+hours) or I would have gone for it myself. I mean, you know, it's summer time, the very best time for a convertible! Not to mention just how ridiculously difficult they are to find. I do wonder though and I hope you'll tell us; Andrew hints at the idea that many (but perhaps not all) of the 101 portables were the 101-13(?) aluminum body machines. Does this mean perhaps the convertible 101 machine heads are aluminum? There's an interesting question and one that I do not have an answer for and it could take years to find enough examples to establish a pattern.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ttatummm
Can't wait to get mine running.  After I got mine unstuck, I just sat there spinning it over and over.  The motor wasn't connected, but couldn't believe how smooth it was.  I think I'm going to like this machine.


I think you like it already...lol.  And it's nice to hear that someone else does that. When I first got the No.12 freed I did the exact same thing. It's as if the repeated spinning of the hand wheel is needed to replace its previous behavior in our heads. Wasn't happy-didn't spin, Am happy-does spin. It's substitution therapy!

__________________
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
0
ttatummm

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 245
Reply with quote  #20 
Ok, yesterday I moved on to the motor.  Cleaned it up and checked the wiring.  There was one odd thing. The motor brushes didn't want to come out.  I assumed it was just some schmutz on the ends of the brushes keeping them from pulling out.  So I removed the armature.  Not a lot of schmutz on the brushes, but I had to pull them from the interior of the motor.  The brushes are a touch too large, they won't fit down the tubes.

There is about a half inch left on these brushes.  I think, I remember reading that you could just sand down brushes to make them fit. Best course of action here? Sand down the brushes so they will fit down the tubes, reinstall the brushes from the interior of the motor, or buy motor brushes of the proper size?

Tammy

__________________
Tammy

Make it sew. -- J.L. Picard
0
pgf

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,228
Reply with quote  #21 
Are the tubes that hold the brushes completely clean?  Seems odd that the brushes would fit at the inner end and not at the outer end.

I think there's nothing wrong with sanding them a bit to make them fit -- but of course do the minimal necessary.  Obviously you don't want them to fit so poorly they start cocking sideways, and possibly binding.  

__________________
My machines: http://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/by-age
0
ttatummm

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 245
Reply with quote  #22 
Yes the tubes are clean, I cleaned them when I cleaned the motor.  It is odd isn't it. The brushes don't bind, I can't get them in the tubes at all.

I'll double check the tubes and then sand the brushes, I guess.

Tammy




__________________
Tammy

Make it sew. -- J.L. Picard
0
Chaly

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 901
Reply with quote  #23 
Maybe at some point the brushes were replaced and they used the wrong size and had to fit them in from the inside?  It does seem strange.  I would either sand them down if you can get a precise shape and size to fit or use new ones.  I have never sanded down brushes so can't give you my personal experience with this.

On my current 101 project - I posted the pictures of the brushes on the 101 features thread. My brushes were painted on the bottom - gold and silver to match the painted gold and silver marks on the outside of the motor case.  I am assuming mine were original brushes to the machine. 

It would be interesting to know if new brushes are the same quality material as the original vintage ones.  I clean with alcohol the used brushes (to remove any carbon dust/oil) and use new only when the brushes are too worn down.  They are usually on most machines easy to check periodically to see how they are wearing.  I always install them in the exact same orientation I removed them.  And when the motor is all back together and I test, I run it on high for a few minutes to make sure the brush ends conform/mold to the commutator.

I've just finished the motor work with mine and wired, cleaned and adjusted the pedal yesterday and everything is in fine working order.  I now have some more wiring work today on the distal motor wires and then I should be good to go sans the final polish and cleaning.

One of the reasons I like this machine is the smoothness as you mentioned and how the balance wheel works - and stitches and operating are so precise.  It's hard to explain - one just needs to use one in good order and compare to other electrics of this era.  And if the controller is adjusted properly I can get the finest sewing speed control - although this would apply to all those Singer carbon controllers - but another topic in itself!
0
ttatummm

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 245
Reply with quote  #24 
The tubes were not completely clean.  Even though I had cleaned them with q-tips dipped in alcohol until there was no more grunge on the q-tips they were not completely clean.  I ran a small flat screw driver down the tubes to see if I could feel anything (since you can't see anything), and sure enough there was some roughness on the tubes. It took several cycles of light scrapping follow by more cleaning until the brushes would fit.

Tammy

__________________
Tammy

Make it sew. -- J.L. Picard
0
pgf

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,228
Reply with quote  #25 
Great!  It's usually reassuring that the most likely problem was, actually, the problem.
__________________
My machines: http://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/by-age
0
Rodney

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 971
Reply with quote  #26 
If the pin goes past the broken threads you might be able to drill and tap a new set screw hole on the side of the post instead.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.