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pgf

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Reply with quote  #1 
Unlike some of you, I've only worked on a few Singer electrics.

The lamp on my Singer 101 keeps coming dislodged.  It seems to me that the setscrew that holds the lamp into the elbow isn't making proper contact with the male parts of the lamp that go into that elbow.

Aside from the screw being incorrect, does this look right?

IMG_20190821_114701005.jpg 

It feels like the screw only makes contact with part of the shoulder.  If I really crank down on the screw, it holds, but tightening it that much makes me worry about the stress on the elbow.

paul


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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #2 
On my first 101 the lamp is broken at this exact location so I'm thinking this is a design flaw that causes stress to the area - I plan to get a replacement lamp for this machine once I get around to working in it. The 101 I got up and running did not have this problem but it looks like a fragile areaa and with the right bump a break could happen. Inhave not really explored this on how to better secure- maybe there are others here that I some ideas.

I'll take this opportunity to again applaud this machine. It's one of engineering interest in many areas - especiaaly the oil wicks - and I think it is a beautiful sleek design. But most important for me is the functionality - its my best machine so far for precision and smoothness - the handwheel - the feeddogs - needlebar - stitch length regulator. - speed control. It's downpoints are the feed dogs don't drop and it definitely does not have the piercing power of the 201s - I have tested in several different projects - and on really thick seams like on bags - the 101 stumbles but the 201 treats this task like going through butter.
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #3 
Until Jim can verify, I think a socket base #191375 is missing. It looks much like modern lamp socket bases. An illustration can be found on page 135 of http://www.supsew.com/wpfb-file/singer-101-2-3-10-11-pdf/

The other possibility is the screw needs to be in the slot of the washer between the felt and the base of fixture.

Janey

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #4 
I don't think it's missing that metal socket -- the socket is complete, but made of plastic, with a toggle switch on top.  Maybe it's not an original lamp.  In any case, thanks for the link to that parts list, Janey -- I've downloaded it.

And you're right --  Jim will know.  Jim knows everything!

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jrwhalley

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Reply with quote  #5 
The two we have are identical in their lights. Chrome or nickel plated Singerlight with a bakelite button-tipped toggle switch. Think you are missing the steel bobbin that is attached over the threaded feed-through tube at the socket end of thelight base shell. You also only are showing a single retaining screw in the cast elbow, where ours have both an upper and a lower. Will try to attach pics.

Attached Images
jpeg IMG_20190825_133535.jpg (265.05 KB, 9 views)
jpeg IMG_20190825_133541.jpg (261.14 KB, 9 views)
jpeg IMG_20190825_133550.jpg (357.44 KB, 9 views)
jpeg IMG_20190825_133630.jpg (310.40 KB, 9 views)
jpeg IMG_20190825_133634.jpg (362.24 KB, 9 views)

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks -- I'll compare your pictures to what I've got.  I'll bet you're right.

paul

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #7 
No, that's not it.  My elbow doesn't have the large diameter yours does.  The steel and bakelite tube (that the threaded pipe screws into, partly covered by the felt washer) is a close match to the ID the elbow on my machine.

As it happens, on closer examination, when I insert the socket assembly all the way into the elbow, and tighten the screw, it bears on the edge of the steel shoulder, and not the bakelite part of the tube.  Also, the elbow, which I had thought was also bakelite, is actually steel.  So I'm a lot less concerned about tightening it hard to get the lamp to stay put.

It all seems very un-Singer-like, though, especially given the rest of the (over-)engineering that went into the design of the machine.  Perhaps mine was repaired at some point -- I got it in one of those vinyl wrapped cases, with wiring that looked like it probably came from the corner sewing store.  Maybe some of the lamp parts did too?

paul

Attached Images
jpeg IMG_20190825_151124851.jpg (66.35 KB, 9 views)
jpeg IMG_20190825_151335685.jpg (68.13 KB, 9 views)


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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #8 
I wish I knew everything..Paul, I haven't seen that sort of switch on a 101 before. It doesn't mean I won't... but I haven't yet. For clarification sake, and since Singer did change things along the 16 years of production... I'm going to have to ask what year yours was made again. I have a 21, a 27, and several 30ish models (as well as a 24 parts machine). The earliest (20-23) had different switches, and the tube & elbow were also different than the 'later' model 24s and forward. Knowing the year may assist me in narrowing down what I do, and don't know about 101 production.
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks Jim.  It's from 1931.  Okay, maybe you don't know everything _now_.  But when we get to the bottom of this, I'm sure you'll become one with the Singer 101.  :-)
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #10 
Seriously -- if you've never seen that sort of switch, it reinforces the "it was replaced" theory, which would explain the unSingerlike design.

paul

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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #11 
I would have to say you may be correct that the light assembly was changed somewhere along the line. Let me check my parts stash.... and my picture library, lol
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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #12 
Well that was fun. None of my archived photos show a light switch like that...
and since I was in that gear, I checked all my serial numbers and do not have one as late as '31.
My newest is August 30, 1930

The weird part... oh yeah, it got weird...
was that two of my 101s are not 'just' 1930 models,
but they both came from the same number allotment of 18 March 1930.
That was a batch of 10,000 and the two are 2,635 machines apart.

That was a surprise. =)

I guess I should really be keeping an eye out for a 1936.

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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #13 
Hi Jim,

  I have a serial number story...there is a guy who sells me industrials from closed factories here.  I got two Reece 104 keyhole machines from him and those are very very expensive machines.  I paid 2k USD each for them used but in good enough shape.  The one, I was told, came from a coat factory on the old Subic Naval Base where there is a free port zone now.  Anyways, one came with a missing cover.  He told me he was not able to go there to get the part and had it in the original picture.  Then he told me the "seller" had an extra part and I could buy it for thousands of pesos (it was a cover piece so cosmetic).  I called him to my contact "hub cap man" and told him how people used to steal hub caps off cars then when you went to go buy a replacement off a wall of used parts you'd be essentially buying your own hub cap back (in this case a piece of the cover assembly).  He claimed he was mad at this guy and would never buy another machine from him.  Later he sold me the other Reece 104 and claimed it came from the Clark area.  So what did i do?  I looked at the serial numbers.  They were 6 or 7 digit serial numbers (just woke up and cannot remember which right now)......and they were sequential serial numbers in other words 1 number apart.  So what are the odds of two machines with sequential serial numbers coming from different parts of the country?  It is possible but unlikely.  More likely the factory bought both new at the same time.  We just made the replacement part out of stainless steel 1.5mm thick (not sure if grade 304 or 308 but think 308 same as our welding rod).  Best regards, Mike
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