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JustGail

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Reply with quote  #1 
After clearing off the sewing table to baste another quilt, I pulled the butterfly quilt off the wall and layered it up as well.  I knew the backing was going to be close but thought it was just long enough.  Then in a daft move I trimmed the batting to the sort of same length as the backing[mad].  I have re-pinned it 3 times, once too far to one end, once crooked, now it will stay as is.

I have enough backing fabric to cut off the side and add to the one end.  The batting is ok at the outside edges, about 2 inches short in center.  My questions are -
- Is it best to lengthen the batting toward the center of the border or even closer to the blocks?  I'm thinking if in the batting is seamed in the center of the border, there will be more quilting to keep it together?
- If I add on, is it best to quilt the blocks & shashing, then add to the border and batting?

This may be a moot question, as the more I look at it and think it over, I may just trim the whole thing down a bit.

This is the quilt - Mom made the blocks years ago, and put them together with no sashing.  I pulled it apart and added the sashing and border to make larger.  The blocks are literal scrap blocks - I remember some of the butterfly fabric from clothes or curtains, and I think she used old sheets for the blocks.
 IMG_3336.jpg


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Gail
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #2 
Before cutting your backing, what I would do is join another piece of batting to what you already have. I cut the batting edges so they're straight and just do a zigzag stitch to join them. Some of my baby quilts are made with 2 or 3 pieces of batting scraps joined this way. Once it's in the quilt no one will ever know.

Cari

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #3 
There is another old trick like this for coming up with filler or batting for a quilt or even a bathrobe. Old terrycloth towels are cut and the raw edges stitched together (zigzag works well) and the whole is laid out and cut to fit for filler. Once the top FMQ is done, no one would ever know it's made of pieces. This is a good way to recycle old terrycloth. 

- Bruce
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #4 
I do what Cari said.  I have many times used up extra pieces of batting by butting up straight edges and seaming them with a zig zag stitch.  Most of my donation baby quilts have my left over batting pieces used up by this method.  One thing I always do is make that batting larger than I think I'll need as the quilting process tends to "eat" some fabric and batting, and you don't want to run short.
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JustGail

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Reply with quote  #5 
"I have enough backing fabric to cut off the side and add to the one end."

Pro tip - if you are ever pretty darned sure your backing is just enough, then fold it up and put it away for months, don't think you remember everything correctly.  MEASURE the backing before layering the quilt and basting.  And especially before starting the quilting.  If possible, take a break between layering and basting to have some coffee, nap, chocolate, new day to think it over - what ever it takes to wake your brain up to start raising questions and alarm bells if needed.  Even better, label the backing top/bottom when you piece it just in case it's a while before you get back to it.

It wasn't until I was about half way done with starting to free motion quilt (first time doing this) that the question of "why is there so much extra backing on this side?" entered my mind.  Yes, I made the highly incorrect assumption that the backing was more or less square.  It WAS big enough, I put it on sideways and never questioned myself why so wide and too short while basting it.   No, I'm not ripping out what I've done.  If I didn't have places where I think I'd destroy the fabric getting the quilting out, I would rip out and re-do the whole thing.

Unghmumblemumblegrrrrr [eek][rolleyes]



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Gail
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #6 
Every quilt is a learning adventure!  Those of us that have made a few have found lots of different ways to do things wrong!  I agree that stepping away from a project to a while can sometimes help, but I guess I'm not one to pack it away for months.  Like to soldier on, get it done, and on to the next one!
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Mavis
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