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Bags

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Reply with quote  #1 
I'm sorry if this question has been asked and answered ad nauseum, but I've been trying to search for the weight proportions of the shellac-flakes to alcohol and either I'm not using the right words to search or I'm just not seeing it. 

Ziggy has been chipping away at the paint splatters on the 66 and now we want to practice the French-polish on it, before we even begin to think about the Pheasant.

We have 2 containers of shellac that he mixed with Everclear and the shellac-flakes.  One is a 1-lb. cut and the other is a 2-lb cut.  He used both on the black walnut neck of his cigar box guitar he's making.  (It looks rather lovely.)

Back to the question, would either of these formulas work?  A different proportion needed? 

Thank you!
Carol

p.s. - yes I will post pictures of the 66


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laurainalameda

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Reply with quote  #2 
https://www.woodcraft.com/blog_entries/success-with-shellac
I get my shellac from Japan Woodworker. They used to be local, now online. But this article. from their blog, helped me understand a lot of the properties of this bug juice. Laura
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Bags

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Laura!  We'll give the article a read.  Ziggy's already mixed up 2 different solutions of the flakes that he used on his cigar box guitar.  We just didn't know if there was a better recipe to use on the machines or not.  Like I said, the neck on his guitar is beautiful, but black metal is a little different than black walnut.  😉

Carol
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laurainalameda

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Reply with quote  #4 
So much of shellac/ alcohol is trial by error for me. With wood, adding a drop of linseed oil slows drying tim. Then it is known as French polish. I have occasionally come across spray shellac, and used it on machines that were not what I call "Wolfgang" quality, meaning not a collector's machine, but rather a red eye 66 or such, and it has been a serviceable sealer.

How odd, isnt it, that I am also interested in cigar box guitars? What did we all do with ourselves and our interests before the internet?
Laura
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Bags

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurainalameda
So much of shellac/ alcohol is trial by error for me. With wood, adding a drop of linseed oil slows drying tim. Then it is known as French polish. I have occasionally come across spray shellac, and used it on machines that were not what I call "Wolfgang" quality, meaning not a collector's machine, but rather a red eye 66 or such, and it has been a serviceable sealer.

How odd, isnt it, that I am also interested in cigar box guitars? What did we all do with ourselves and our interests before the internet?
Laura


We're going to just do the trial and error method with the flakes.  Ziggy has tested a couple of inconspicuous spots on the 66 and so far looks good.  After we finish it we'll post before and after pictures.

CBG's must be getting more popular.  It's getting harder and harder to find the boxes for pennies.  Here's Ziggy's 1st try making a CBG.  He hand carved the neck from one of the Black Walnut trees we had to cut down.
1st cigar box guitar - black walnut.jpg

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