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Seijun

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Reply with quote  #1 
Any recommendations on a domestic machine that could handle thick faux fur material? So far I have only tried on my Singer 66, and some seams had a really hard time fitting under the presser foot. I imagine any of my Whites could handle it because of their ability to hyper extend the foot, BUT I am also looking for a machine that will take a walking foot attachment. This rules out all my Whites!
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Mickey

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Reply with quote  #2 
I guess a high shank industrial, or a fur stitcher like 176 can be hand when piecing varous piled and textured materials. Faux fur is often on jersey cotton backing, sometimes woven, but I don't really know how it behaves on a fur stitcher. Neither do I know if you ever will find a model that takes a separate walking foot with higher presser foot lift than a 66, 15 or 201. Necchi models might be the best alternative, several of them came both as low shank and high shank. The BU and Supernova models are nice. Maybe a Davis Vertical feed? 

I just remembered, if you comb the fur flat it tends to slide more easily under the presser foot and much less polyester hair in the seam. Sometimes you can cut it (sort of shearling) near the seam if it doesn't show.
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #3 
The usual way to sew faux fur is to clip the fur off up to the seam line. This eliminates the bulk.

Cari

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Seijun

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Reply with quote  #4 
I will look into Necchi. I was also researching the Pfaff 130 which is zigzag and can take a walking foot, but I don't know how much clearance it has under the presser foot.
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Seijun

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Reply with quote  #5 
There is one Necchi about an hour from me, a Julia 534, that will take high shank feet. Price is $180. I am a little confused though. I know what a high shank foot looks like compared to a low shank foot, but why is high shank better? It looks like the clearance under the foot is the same as a low shank [confused]
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seijun
There is one Necchi about an hour from me, a Julia 534, that will take high shank feet. Price is $180. I am a little confused though. I know what a high shank foot looks like compared to a low shank foot, but why is high shank better? It looks like the clearance under the foot is the same as a low shank [confused]

For the most part I think it is the same. The good thing about high shank machines is the variety of feet, since most can use industrial high shank feet. I'm also thinking about looking for a vintage domestic with a higher lift, don't know enough to know if there is one.

Cari

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johnstuart

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Reply with quote  #7 
The early Singer IF and IM had a presser bar spring rather than the regular coil around the foot bar. You can release the presser foot spring and adjust to accept high shank. Not a viable alternative, but just in case you run across one or have one in your collection.

  John Stuart
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Mickey

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Reply with quote  #8 
How are you doing? Cutting the fur off will give better stitching, but with top stitch thread I guess anything will hold. It will get very lumpy with all the hair in the seam?

I still wonder if a Davis Vertical Feed can be an alternative. I just read a piece where someone does all her quilting on one of these, and she mentioned it takes the thickest cotton batting between the layers, which can be a bit of a struggle on some machines. Maybe a Davis model is too few and far between to get you hands on?   When you push domestic machines to the limit you need to get the right model fit for the job; they can be very capable, but the next step is as  mentioned an industrial. That said, know faux fur often can be a frustration, but for the domestic machines are up to the job.
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #9 
You want a machine that you can very quickly clean lint out of the bobbin area.
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