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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #1 
About two years ago I given a Singer 101 when buying a work table at garage sale. It was very dirty and looked if stored on a garage floor for decades. It cleaned up nicely, it sewed well, my wife used it to make heavy duty tote bag. She mentioned that the motor startup was not as consitent as a 201. I fixed that after discovery on second 101.

After dozens of Singer 127, 128, 66, 99 a second 101 came my way. It had a stuck handwheel. It took three days of tri-flow lubricant to get it free enough to disassemble drive gear sleeve from upper shaft. The root cause, 3-in-1 oil used as lubricant, it turned to varnish. Dissasembly is fairly easy, first remove hand wheel stop nut, then two setscrews on handwheel, then two screws that hold bobbin winder/endcover. Next pull potted motor, one screw at front, then loosen two setscrews on machine upper shaft, adjacent to, but not on bevel gear. Slide out assembly, spurgear, sleeve and endcover.
The spurgear has hidden parts inside, a one-way roller clutch, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring can be tested in the machine rotating the spurgear, it should rotate a few degrees, then spring back, just like the gear on a 201 or 15-91 handwheel. I found broken hoop springs in two out of three Singer 101. I fabricated new springs using 0.047 music wire.

The only other problem found on one machine was stuck linkage on the feed dog linkages. The stitch length adjustment knob bounced up and down. There is a spring under knob, it seems to serve as mechanical relief. It took removing the complete feed dog linkage, placing in ultrasonic cleaner with simple green water solution for about 20 minutes. The linkages use pins instead of typical cone screws.

Don't get me wrong I love these machines, my other favorite is the Singer 115.

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #2 
Good info for me to know how to fabricate a broken spring.  Thanks for sharing this info.

What do you like about the Singer 115?
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #3 
The spring was fabricated using smooth flat needle nose, and stepped round needle nose. The interesting part is Singer 101 drive has fail safes in design, it will work with failed spring, and locked sleeve.

Singer 115 looks like a 15-30 on the outside, but it has a rotary hook vs oscillating. They run very smooth, quiet and take very little input power. They are cam driven, so no gears, fewer moving parts, one less long shaft on the bottom. My wife loves them. Here is a short clip of her treadle sewing.

I ponder about how things might have been if the 115 design, was used for 101,201 and 221.

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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #4 
I like the 115’s too. Very smooth. Mine has an annoying habit of unthreading the needle.
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Kitcarlson

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Keeping needle bar up to thread a needle is special. There is not enough friction in system to keep needle up. It requires external force, a handcrank with handle down, or a treadle belt with pedal linkage low, or one hand on handwheel, engage bobbin winder, or electric motor and belt. The thread cutter on the presser foot can pinch hold a thread, when starting and ending. I see my wife sewing quilt pieces in chains, to avoid any issue.

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