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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #1 
This may very well end up not being off-topic after all.  I have had serious problems in getting my quilts sandwiched for quilting.  Many years ago, my husband ordered a Hinterland (I think) frame -- at the time, I was only making a baby quilt, so it's maximum size (determined by the pipes and wood was for a twin size.  Well, the thing is, my Hinterland frame can be expanded to make a larger size - say 12 feet, or even more for those extra large king size quilts.  All we have to do is replace the pipes and the 1 X 6 pine.  What I will use it for, though, is to sandwich my quilt.  Because it has leaders to attach to the quilt top and to the backing, and it rolls up as each section is completed!  I keep asking myself why I didn't think of this before!  I think this will work -- it's got to be a heck of a lot easier than bending over my bed, trying to pin baste the sandwich.  Yes, I could hand-quilt using this, too!  I just want an easier way to sandwich my quilts!

EDIT:  I'm hoping I can make this work -- any comments, recommendations are appreciated.

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Jeanette Frantz, Ocala, Florida
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Reply with quote  #2 
I've not done it myself but have heard of many folks using their handquilting frames for sandwiching.  If I had one I'm sure I'd be very tempted to as well.  I use my cutting table and binder clips so I'm not doing lots of bending.  Good luck.
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Christy

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Reply with quote  #3 
I've sandwiched mine on the floor a couple times.  Now that I have a frame and machine on it, I load them on the frame and start quilting.  I am guessing your frame is a Hinterberg.  If you are going to extend the frame, and then load a quilt on it, maybe consider putting a machine on it?


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  • Christy
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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #4 
Christy,

I have serious back problems, having had lumbar spine surgery twice.  Standing on my feet for long periods of time (more than 30 minutes) causes extreme pain, and bending is not something I can do without serious consequences.  I don't  believe the frame would support a machine  on it.  I have a very large dining room table (but it's too low for sandwiching a quilt) on which I can sew/quilt.  I believe this frame will solve my sandwiching problem -- which right now, prevents me from finishing my quilts.  First, the frame will not require a space that is 120" X 130" (which is the size of my red and white log cabin quilt) because the sandwich can be rolled up, and it's a sit-down accessible frame.

EDIT:  Anything would be better than what I've tried, and the bending over is just not something I can do.

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Jeanette Frantz, Ocala, Florida
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #5 
Jeanette, hope this frame/sandwiching idea works for you.  It's the pits to sandwich on the floor, but I always seem to go back to that method.  I realize that's not an option for you.  When the day ever comes that I'm not physically able to crawl around and bend over the quilt, I don't know how I'll get it done.  I'll figure it out when the time comes, I'm sure.  Sandwiching is not a fun stage of the quilting process.  
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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #6 
Mavis,

I know that prices have gone up in the past several years.  My husband got the kit for my Hinterberg Frame for about $45, and, of course, we had to purchase some 1" X 6" (or is it 8") and some piping, but the whole thing was, I think, less than $100.  It's a whole lot easier to sit in a chair and pin-baste your quilt sandwich than to stand, or crawl around on the floor.  My trouble is, if I get down on the floor, I can't get back up.  I had an instance that happened in the grocery store, back before my back got so bad, I bent down to get some marshmallow cream from the bottom shelf, and I could not get back up -- a couple of ladies helped me up, and I appreciated their help so much.  But, I learned, and I just can't get down on the floor any more.  Bending over and standing is no longer an option.

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Jeanette Frantz, Ocala, Florida
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Reply with quote  #7 
Sandwiching a quilt is one of the hardest steps for me, too. I have arthritis in my lower back and hips, replaced one hip but the other isn't doing so hot these days...so crawling around on the floor just isn't going to happen.  I've done that a couple times and I paid for it for days afterwards.  I learned my lesson!

I used a wall to baste for awhile and that was nice and easy, but I'd get ripples/puckers along whatever edge was the bottom.  And sometimes my method of holding it to the wall (painter's tape and Command clips) would fail and the whole thing would come peeling down from the wall and get glue everywhere and make me very cranky.

Now I drape over a folding table and it works great.  I don't tape or strap anything down; I let gravity work its magic and I just glue the bejeebus out of it with Elmer's and nothing can possibly pucker.  Best part is if my back is sore I can sit in a rolling chair and do the whole thing sitting.  Usually I can so it all standing up, but when things are aching and complaining and I'm on a deadline of some sort, I'll drag over a chair and get it done.

I like being a human being, but sometimes I wish I could just upload my brain into a nice, pain-free robot body.

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Happily stitching in Santa Rosa, California

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