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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #51 
That purple machine has probably had two refurbs in its life. The first one gave it the Singer badge and the second one gave it that god awful color.

Cari

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #52 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cari-in-Oly
That purple machine has probably had two refurbs in its life. The first one gave it the Singer badge and the second one gave it that god awful color.

Cari


AW, purple is my favorite color, but not on a sewing machine. I'm generally not a fan of repaints. Maybe if it was a deep royal purple with some gold decals.

I don't know how they got a 66-18 manual for it. If that is the manual that is with it. The 66-18 would have a reverse.

Janey


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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #53 
Oh, I like purple too, and I have a DD that purple has been her whole life, lol. But that color on that machine just says blech! to me.

Cari

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #54 
Yes, I agree, it isn't a very pretty purple for an old 66. It looks like it might be a metallic that wasn't put on properly or it could be the lighting.

Janey

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bkay

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Reply with quote  #55 
I also  have a refurb. It's so ugly, I've never figured out what to do with it. It does have a nice face plate. You can see the singer stuff under the the crinkle finish.

I bought it for the cabinet.

bkay

DSC_0413.JPG 

DSC_0427.JPG

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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #56 
It is ugly. Parts? Nice table.
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J Miller

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Reply with quote  #57 
bkay,

I'd take the chrome bits off and remove the crinkle paint from them, then reassemble it and use it.   I'll bet it sews a great stitch.  And if you use a q-tip and some paint remover real careful you should be able to get the paint off of the medallion.
That would spiffy it up a bit. 

It might be ugly, but it's too good to be a parts machine.

Joe

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Visit our Etsy store for pet related goodies and other items too.
https://www.etsy.com/shop/TBearsAndOtherWares?ele=shop_open

I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
JM in FT Wayne, IN

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bkay

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Reply with quote  #58 
I just scraped the paint off the serial number, it's G6970911. Ismacs says it's a 27, made in 1910??? I would guess the date might be correct. 

This one is going to be another learning machine. I'm afraid to do anything to my good machines - I might mess them up. So, they just sit there.

Besides, how many machines can you sew on at a time? I have a 503 that I love and am currently using. I was gifted with my late mom's 15-91 from her husband a few months back, that I plan to use for FMQ. I also have 2 -201-2's and a few more interesting machines that make a great stitch. Then, I have some not so great machines that are pretty colors. This one is way down the list past all those. So, it's now another learning machine.

bkay
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J Miller

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Reply with quote  #59 
bkay,

Try this chart:  http://ismacs.net/singer_sewing_machine_company/serial-numbers/singer-g-series-serial-numbers.html

It's actually a 66; 1 of 50,000 allotted April 29-1919.   

Before being refurbed it was most likely a 66-1 with the back clamping feet.

Joe

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Visit our Etsy store for pet related goodies and other items too.
https://www.etsy.com/shop/TBearsAndOtherWares?ele=shop_open

I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
JM in FT Wayne, IN

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bkay

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Reply with quote  #60 
Apparently, I stopped at the first G697... number I saw. I looked up the 66-1 and that looks right.

You can see the decals through the later applied paint. It looked like this before the refurb:
 
Singer 66-1.jpg 

It's unlikely I can make it look like that again, but maybe....

Then, it's unlikely I can get it to sew again, but maybe...

i can always sell the parts if I fail.

bkay

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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #61 
Keep on trying, bkay! I actually got a motor open and it looks like replacing the wires involves just a bit of soldering (never done it on electrical stuff, but I'm sure I can!). It sure seems hard at first, though.
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Margaret 
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bkay

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Reply with quote  #62 
It's a Red Eye! That's what Miriam said it was many months ago when I bought it.

This refurb of the refurb just got harder. Boy, there are a lot of decals on this machine. Getting them in the right place won't be easy.

It's definitely going to be a learning machine.

bkay
DSC_1195.JPG

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Arnold

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Reply with quote  #63 
I want to share a few photos of a machine [ belongs to a friend ] that appears to have been electrified in the 1930's or 1940's by looking at the old style foot control and wiring coupling. And the wiring used is an old style single strand cloth covered. The machine is an early 1900's Standard Slim Rotary which also has chain stitch capability. Looks like is was never used after the conversion as the foot control is brand new condition inside and out and so is the cord and motor. Possibly because there is no way to stop the machines motion when winding a bobbin ? 

Arnold StdRot10.jpg 

 

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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #64 
Beautiful machine, Arnold. I have some here that I don't think we're ever used after being electrified. Mine had black paint over some or all decals. I could tell they hadn't been used since, too. Gilding a lily with mud?
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MJTX

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Reply with quote  #65 

Reviving an old thread…

Yesterday I picked up a 1910 Singer 66 (serial # G766048) with a Revco reverse modification. I never knew anything about this type of modification before so it’s been interesting to read about this! As you can see by the pics, the machine has no trace of decals, but otherwise is in good shape – I’m still in the process of the clean and shine.. It sews just fine.

There is no motor boss so the motor bracket is screwed to the back, but it is well done and not wonky. The motor is a Speedmaster 1 amp so it really hums along; it’s set up as a cord block unit with a Sears brand foot controller. The tension unit is a bit different, it has a numbered “dial” but is basically the old style screw in adjustment type. The foot is a standard low shank side clamp and the machine came in a tattered but reasonably sound carry case.

Thanks Miriam & everyone for the info on Revco. This machine was at my favorite country church thrift shop. The ladies there now call me when they get a sewing machine…talk about enabling! As was said up thread, wouldn’t you love to know the history of these machines? Dang, it’s over a hundred years old now!  

Singer 66 with revco reverse.jpg  Revco stitch regulator.jpg  Singer 66 tension unit.jpg  sears foot controller.jpg 



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White Rotary Treadle, Singer 15-88, 15-91, 127, 99K, 223, 306K, 403, 404, Dressmaker 2400, White 445 & 967, Nelco SZ-207, Kenmore 158.840, Monarch 15 clone, Foley's 910.
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Andy Ybarra

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Reply with quote  #66 
Truly interesting this topic, with you you learn many things, congratulations!
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khogue

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Reply with quote  #67 
MJ does that modification take away the bobbin winder? 

Neat machine, love the enablers! 😉

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KarenH in OK

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David

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Reply with quote  #68 
Karen -

On a 66 it's fine.  I'm not sure about a 27/127 with the high bobbin winder, I didn't check them.  On a 27 with the low bobbin winder it does get in the way.  I have my thread guide pulled to the left and held with thread so it won't bump against the Revco.

I have a video of it here:


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David
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MJTX

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Reply with quote  #69 
Hi Karen, This machine came with a kinda loose non-original bobbin winder and I took it off before I took the pic. (see below of new pic with bobbin winder on) but no, the modification didn't really interfere with the location of this type bobbin winder. I found an original 66 bobbin winder on ebay, so we'll see if that one works better and doesn't seem so loose. It's the same type, black in color and will at least "match". [smile] BTW, Good luck in your 201 quest!

David, Thank you for that very helpful video! I kept looking at my machine and thinking...okay, just how did they go about installing the Revco? Now I know - really appreciate that. Nice Sphinx machine too!

66 bobbin winder.jpg 






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White Rotary Treadle, Singer 15-88, 15-91, 127, 99K, 223, 306K, 403, 404, Dressmaker 2400, White 445 & 967, Nelco SZ-207, Kenmore 158.840, Monarch 15 clone, Foley's 910.
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Pracar

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Reply with quote  #70 
I recently purchased this April 13, 1926 singer 66 Rebuilt machine. Does anyone else have one done by this company and have more information?
The company is Bega Rebuilt Machine with Bega Parts.it is trademarked. All singer parts except for the motor and foot peddle.
She does sew like a dream thanks to my very talented husband.

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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #71 
Welcome Pracar.  I know I don't other than the info here.  I can guess they were one of many companies refurbishing machines during and after WWII.  Looks like they were a little more proud of their work than some given the new decals.
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revtheresa

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Reply with quote  #72 
Just got a  refurbed 27 off Sacramento's SGW.  My husband considered taking her back to original, but I think she has a lot to say about the time period and making do with what you could afford.  She isn't ugly with her at least half way professional crinkle paint job and aluminum Singer name tag.  The resituated bobbin winder can be troublesome for reverse.  She was born in 1899 and reborn somewhere between 1949 and probably 1963.  The case is mostly Masonite and plywood with a leather grain texture.  The motor is bolted on and has very little room for adjustment of the belt.  She does sew well enough but stitch length is out of range, we are trying to figure out how to adjusted the Revco reverser.
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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #73 
Welcome aboard!  Pictures?  I know some members here have worked with the Revco reversers.  Hopefully one will be along.

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