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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #1 
As discussed with Farmer John at VSS in Wisconsin, you don't really know a machine very well until you've made your first quilt with it. Here's a simple donation quilt I made with the "Redeye" (Singer 66). Note the addition of battery operated light so sewing at night wasn't a problem.
Linda, did you see I made good use of leftovers by making little "city lights" art panels? They were a lot of fun and well worth the extra time. Will do that again in the future. Also, I don't know if you can make out the quilting designs I used, but they were based on what you taught us!

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Mavis
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #2 
For me I don't really know a machine all that well until I sew denim and have to go through a seam or fell a seam with a size 19 needle with ticket 30 thread and either ticket 50 or 30 on the bobbin (machine decides that).  Also, machines vary wildly when button hole attachments are attached to them.    Best regards, Mike
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Mavis

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Mike, I laughed at your criteria...guess I don't know any of my machines well enough at that rate!  I confess the binding was sewn on by my brother machine as I am fond of the walking foot that came with it.  And I quilt all of my projects on a siddown, mid arm machine.  But as far as piecing, I loved that satisfying clicking and clacking of the hand crank.  Will certainly use this machine for more than living room decoration in the future!
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Mavis
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Reply with quote  #4 
Hi Mavis,  Glad to get a little laugh out of some dry humor...  I've found that industrials are obviously specialized to some extent but so also are domestics.  Domestics are supposed to be do-all machines but really can't and will excel in certain areas as you mentioned.  Example, a "high speed" machine here as they call a tailors machine typically a Juki 5550n or similar can be mod'd to do different things better by changing out to different needle plates and feed dogs (example more than one row of feed dogs) and the presser feet can do zippers or other stuff with attachments.  Kind of like running shoes and other types of shoes.  They are all shoes aren't they?  I'm really enjoying our White FR right now in a twig treadle table.  I've heard it is a favorite amongst some quilters for bigger harp space.  Wow, is that machine nothing short of amazing.  I'm going to do some research into a better way to do zippers with it.  It will entail a modified presser foot to change out and even likely a special plate that can be used with a groove for the zipper (made out of my favorite high grade stainless sheet we order).  It will protect bed from the metal zipper than change back as needed.  Got to give it some thought as I got the idea while modifying (in beginning process of ordering the specialized parts) a 39500 3 thread Union Special serger.  We have three of same heavy duty type.  Factory gave me a list of all the parts to mod for specialized zipper work and one of those was a plate that had a groove in it.  And by changing presser foot back and using two screws will go back to original needle plate.  Might even add a cloth guide.  Now here is three specialized machines we just worked on.....patchers of three different types.  Just yesterday I was using one of them to sew hand woven abaca with v346 thread on a headband native costume for the kids.  Day before was fixing a blown flip flop [cool] Too many cool projects for these but likely not any quilts for these little beasts ever in their future [smile]I was just thinking to break out one of the hand cranks for a new-to-sewing person we have coming to the house and now will [smile]  I had her using the treadle and she said to my wife "privately" that Kuya Mike (translated to Brother Mike) must be punishing her by making her use the treadle.....day 2 a little better and a little more excited.....next week will get her on a hand crank.  This is a college student who just got her bachelors and working on post graduate law school !!  Obviously a smart young lady because we got her learning to sew on the side (yes I am paying her for visits but it is a pittance in my opinion) as she also has the mind of an entrepreneur.  So I guess even people are specialized also !  Maybe some day she will be a business partner with tons of brains to bring to the team.  We are currently making a custom table for a Merrow mg-4d-45 machine made to close toes on socks.  We are using it for making sport seams like the activeseam.  Another very specialized app for an overlock.  I bought out the entire factory (except three machines they will keep to sew socks for amputees) so will eventually have over 20 of them in a factory line up with servos special tables and be able to make my own line of sports wear.  It will lead to a couple flat seamers for certain as well.  I've been talking to Sammie and Sharon about making my first quilt for the tree house.  I'll be a fish out of water but with help from the gurus like them and possibly others may just soon have favorite quilting machines like you.  Best regards, Mike
Patcher RC32 Pic3 6Aug.jpg  Patcher RC32 Pic2 6Aug.jpg  Patcher RC32 Pic1 6Aug.jpg  Patcher29kCloneCowboyCB4500Jul20.jpg 

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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hmmm, quilts in the Philippines are probably mostly used for things like picnic blankets, I imagine.  You are certainly thinking in your sewing operation and sound ready to take off in the business world.  Good for you for teaching a young lady to sew (and on vintage machines, to boot!). Happy sewing adventures wished for you and yours.
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Mavis
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #6 
Mavis, beautiful quilt! I love how you quilted it! Isn't it fun to learn something new/different and feel how it evolves to become your own?
I am working on piecing the back for DS and DIL's quilt, and keep Linda's art pieced backings in my mind as I play with the elements. :)

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hi Mavis,

  Thanks for the kind comments.  You bring up a very interesting point.....no aircon in that tree house.  Has anyone made a light duty quilt before?  Folks do use light covers around here.  Knowing about zero about quilts I would imagine it is some type of quilt without batting/insulation.  Suggestions?

Best regards, 
Mike


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superpickles

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Reply with quote  #8 
For a very thin quilt I'd imagine you could use flannel for batting, doubling it or tripling it if you wanted more thickness. I am certain I have seen antique quilts padded that way, although I am not a quilter myself.
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks for the recommendation for flannel.  Had to do some giggling (googling) on flannel to be sure I understood everything needed to know.  Apparently, it can be wool, synthetic, or cotton but importantly it can shrink.  If possible to find I'd think a cotton flannel (guaranteed to be such) and pre washed to control shrinking might just be the answer.  Single layer for certain.  The Mrs. was commenting about fans the other day in the tree house so that is on the list as we just didn't get around to permanently affixed fans yet.  

Best regards,
Mike


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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mavis
As discussed with Farmer John at VSS in Wisconsin, you don't really know a machine very well until you've made your first quilt with it. Here's a simple donation quilt I made with the "Redeye" (Singer 66). Note the addition of battery operated light so sewing at night wasn't a problem.
Linda, did you see I made good use of leftovers by making little "city lights" art panels? They were a lot of fun and well worth the extra time. Will do that again in the future. Also, I don't know if you can make out the quilting designs I used, but they were based on what you taught us!


Your quilt  is so inviting - it is pretty and light and looks so comfortable.  It goes so well with your sewing area and matches perfect with your Redeye.
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ke6cvh
Thanks for the recommendation for flannel.  Had to do some giggling (googling) on flannel to be sure I understood everything needed to know.  Apparently, it can be wool, synthetic, or cotton but importantly it can shrink.  If possible to find I'd think a cotton flannel (guaranteed to be such) and pre washed to control shrinking might just be the answer.  Single layer for certain.  The Mrs. was commenting about fans the other day in the tree house so that is on the list as we just didn't get around to permanently affixed fans yet.  

Best regards,
Mike




I wouldn't use flannel as batting, yes it's thin but flannel is still warm. In the southern US it's common to make what's known as "summer quilts" that are just a top and a back with no batting at all. Might be something to think about in your climate.

Cari

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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #12 
That's a very pretty quilt Mavis. Some little girl will be lucky to have it.

Cari

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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #13 
Thanks, everyone.  Yes, it's to be a gift for some little girl at our church.  
Mike, the rules that I thought existed in how you must make a quilt really don't exist.  If you used two layers (top and backing) and no  batting in the middle, that's just fine.  I imagine light weight would be better for you.  Here in Minnesota, we use a lot of warm quilts with out bitter cold winters.  
One of the best  things to remember is that your quilt is your quilt.  You are free to make it your own and used techniques that work for you.  There are many different styles and techniques to get the job done and no one will send over the quilt police to tell you it's not done the "right way."  Have fun and be sure to show us when it's finished!

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Mavis
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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #14 
i'll second, third or maybe more than a dozen -- compliments on your quilt.  I didn't count them!  lol!  And, yes, your quilt is your own -- no definite rules.  Except, on your backing, you definitely want to pre-wash, so that if it's going to shrink, it does it before you attach it to your top!  I know, I'm old fashioned, but it's just a simple fact that (in addition to the fact that I cannot type worth 2 cents) cotton fabric will shrink! 
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #15 
Thank you, Jeanette.  Yes, I guess pre-washing is done by a lot of quilters.  I do not pre-wash, but I starch before I finish cutting and piecing, so my material has been "soaked" and heated (pressed) before I sew it up.  Seems to work for me.
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Mavis
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Christy

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Reply with quote  #16 
That's a lovely quilt!  It looks so nice and cuddly.  I like the crinkly look of a fresh washed quilt.

I like to pre-wash my fabrics, but it's not always possible.  Precuts can make it difficult.  I just made a quilt from a packaged fabric kit and since I had no idea how close they had planned the fabric I was afraid to wash it first and have any shrinkage.  Many of the fabrics in the kit were only a 10" cuts.  At one point I was dabbing a disappearing pen mark with water on a Q-tip and the purple batik started bleeding into the white!  [redface]

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Mrs. D

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mavis
As discussed with Farmer John at VSS in Wisconsin, you don't really know a machine very well until you've made your first quilt with it. Here's a simple donation quilt I made with the "Redeye" (Singer 66). Note the addition of battery operated light so sewing at night wasn't a problem.
Linda, did you see I made good use of leftovers by making little "city lights" art panels? They were a lot of fun and well worth the extra time. Will do that again in the future. Also, I don't know if you can make out the quilting designs I used, but they were based on what you taught us!


Mavis.  I love your quilt.  So happy to see you sewed some "city lights" into your panels on the backing of your quilt.  Very cool. 

I'd like to take a class with you on the fancy FMQ panels you showed us (at the June 15, 2019 VSF Gathering in Wisconsin).  Those pieces were breathtaking.  Have you posted more photos of them on VSF?  Have you finished your quilt using those fancy panels?  

Your bud,
Linda

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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #18 
Hi Christy, thank you for the kind comments.  Yes, those fabrics can sometimes behave badly, can't they!  Color bleeding onto white fabrics would be heartbreaking.  

Linda, sorry for the late response.  Life's been busy with lots of "doings" this year.  My quilting drops off during the summer months with all the mowing weeding, trimming, gardening, and trips to northern Minnesota to take care of our little piece of heaven by the lake!  Since that quilt instructor passed away, I have only worked on one more panel.  Have not photographed it or posted any more pics.  I will try to  get back to making a finished project of it all,  as it was so fun when Jeanne Harrison was posting her videos of step by step quilting classes.  Her videos are still available on-line, through f.b.

I did get to a local quilt show and found some great vendors.  One couple was from Wisc. - she sold hand knitted gloves and hats, he had fabulous adjustable wooden ladder type stands for displaying quilts.  Of course I bought one as well as a new winter hat!

Hope your quilts, purses, etc are selling well at the craft fairs!


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Mavis
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