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J Miller

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Reply with quote  #1 
How much plastic is in the Pfaff 362 machine?   Are they good, bad, or indifferent machines? 
Watching one, wifie is interested.

Joe

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Lothlorien93

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Reply with quote  #2 
Wish I could answer that for you....

I'm sure you would get an answer here , but you need to be a member.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/oldpfaffpforum/conversations/messages

My Pfaff 6 is all metal, 1956 I think....same as a 230 but no thread cutter.


I just looked on Ebay (Not the best source) all the parts to the 362 were metal, well that they had listed.

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Reply with quote  #3 
Joe,
The internals of the 362 are all metal. The major complaint I hear about that model is its complicated mechanism seizing with disuse. (But you can free up a machine in your sleep.) From personal experience I can tell you that one weak spot is the 'rat-tail' control knobs, which are made of plastic. Be sure the machine is moving freely before you put any stress on them. (Ask me how I know. [rolleyes]) Once you get used to them, the 200 and 300 series Pfaffs are wonderful, sturdy machines.

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Tom W

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Reply with quote  #4 
only the knobs on the front are plastic, and it can become quite brittle on some machines (seems to be sun/UV damage as the knobs are usually also yellowed). Some of the best of the Pfaff's are in that range. If the price is right, I'd buy it... sew a bummer on a Buick kind of workhorse.

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J Miller

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks, the machine she's interested in doesn't look like the knobs are yellowed.   So, we'll watch it till the end and see what happens.

Joe

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Candace

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Reply with quote  #6 
There's a nylon gear hidden at the top of the machine.  I've been told it's not under a lot of stress and that they generally don't break.  But, I still watch it and check it when I do maintenance.  Most of my vintage Pfaffs have cracked knobs.  I've bought many that didn't look cracked but hadn't been used in ages so they started to form cracks as I used them.  No big deal unless they really break, but something to watch out for.  It does have Stopmatic which is kind of cool and I think the first Pfaff model that had it.  The cleated belts are NLA and are very pricey to replace.  But, they are lovely machines when operating properly.  
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J Miller

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Reply with quote  #7 
Candace,

Thanks for the heads up on the plastic bits.   It might be a sale breaker, both of us are tired of worrying about plastic stuff.


Joe

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PatriciaPf

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Candace
The cleated belts are NLA and are very pricey to replace.  But, they are lovely machines when operating properly.  


The drive belt on my 360 failed and we replaced it with an after market belt which was supposed to work but didn't.  I found a slightly used cleated belt on ebay--they are rare--and paid about $50 for it, but it was either pay, or do without the machine.

The machines do seize because of the old stuff that was sprayed in them to prevent rust during transport.  I sprayed mine with a solvent (PB Blaster) and turned the hair dryer on it, moving everything until it worked properly, then lubed it well.  

The 360 or 362 is a fine machine, and very well engineered.  Find out if the belts are good before commiting to buying.  Belts are VERY hard to find.

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Inezzme

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Reply with quote  #9 

I just acquired a Pfaff 362.  Seller said it was seized.  I got it home and it did straight stitch and zig zag just slick as anything, forward and reverse.  

Then it started to seize. There are 4 points in the stitch that it just is really hard to turn the wheel, highest and lowest.  (I don't see any thread stuck, but I did have a couple issues with bobbin thread.  Previous owner liked to wind color on color on color on that bobbin.  UGH.) 

Any idea what I am up against? 

No thread on the hook.  It runs pretty well for several stitches then seizes on the highest and lowest points. If I turn the handwheel away from me, it works quite freely.  So, it must be something related to that forward motion of the handwheel?

 I was SO JAZZED about this machine as it came with original owner's manual and all the accessory feet as well as that super duper decoder wheel.  It has a broken off reverse lever, but it can be used.  

I was going to rehab and rehome this, but now I am becoming attached.  

 

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stitchntime

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Reply with quote  #10 
If it was turning easily and now won't, you probably have a thread wound around the hook.  This happened with my 360 and I had to remove the hook to clear the thread.  Follow the instructions in the service manual to remove the hook.

If you just got it and it's always been sticky or jammed, lube all the oil points (indicated in red paint) and gently rotate by hand until it frees up.  You may have to do this with all the adjustment levers as well.  Pfaff factory lube is notorious for turning into an effective glue when it sits for a long time.

Hope that helps

Greg
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Inezzme

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Reply with quote  #11 
It goes fine for about 10 seconds then seizes. I can't see any thread and I took the needle plate off to check as well. I am so sad. I was going to rehabthis for sale, but I am becoming rather attached.

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Olaf

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Reply with quote  #12 
For Pfaff 362, there is probably some info in this thread. Link to workshop manual almost at the end.

https://www.victoriansweatshop.com/post/pfaff-362-help-please-using-the-stitch-wheel-or-is-there-a-problem-with-my-8125238?pid=1311272143

Olaf

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Inezzme

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Reply with quote  #13 
I have read that entire thread and find nothing close to the issue I am experiencing.

After sitting for a while, the machine sews fine for a very short time, then something binds on the highest and lowest points of the stitch.

It only does this when the handwheel is moving forward, either by hand (fwd) or motor (fwd and rev).

Everything moved freely turning the handwheel away by hand.

I am stumped.

Thanks.
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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #14 
My guess is bent crankshaft.
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