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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #1 
An appeal to the experts here: what was the first VSM with a push button reverse?

I don't use a reverse feature that much but when I do I much prefer the levers.  For me the levers are easer to use (just flip the lever and let go - you don't have to keep pressing it in and then you have your hand to use again for sewing if needed) and they seem to be a better design.  The buttons have springs and seem like a weak area that could fail easier than a lever.

Were the buttons just a design gimmick?

I love my Necchi Supernova but the big con for me is the push button reverse.  It is especially annoying when sewing with a small stitch length - like satin stitching.  When I want to secure the satin stitching (necessary to do with slippery type threads) the button barely moves in and the feeds don't work that well.  The work around would be to lengthen the stitch length before the reverse button is pressed - but what pain.

Maybe others of you like the push button reverse?

My Elna 62C is a bit of an improvement since it has a spring reverse lever plus a dial for continuous reverse if needed (I still like the old type reverse levers better).
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hello group,

  My White 77MG has separate adjustments for forward and reverse stitch length.  I always thought that was pretty slick.  I was just reading information on the old Frister and Rossman Cub 3 which is going to be identical to some of the other Kenmore portable machines and noted someone's comment that the reverse stitch length was fixed and not the same as the forward.  Now I'm wondering if my Kenmore 158.1060 and Frister and Rossman Cub 7 (same basic machine) also have this issue of fixed reverse stitch length or adjustable.  Something new to try out tomorrow. I would think because it has reverse type stretch stitches that are adjusted through the stitch length then the reverse is adjustable but just want to be certain. 
 
  My 1917 Davis NVF has a back tack push button on it and the Wheeler and Wilson no 12 from the 1890's had one as well but that's an industrial.

Best regards,
Mike
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #3 
The buttons may have just been a gimmick. I can't find a sewing machine made with a reverse button prior to 1954. In '54 it appears that one Viking model and perhaps the "TZ" line of Japan manufactured machines (White, Domestic, Morse, American Beauty, etc) had a push button reverse - and the earliest of those still had a lever. In 1956 the same Japanese line, Viking, and the brand new Supernova model from Necchi.

And, I agree with you. I like my lever better.

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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #4 
I VASTLY prefer a lever reverse - the pushbutton is a nuisance. As Jim notes, the Toyotas bridged the transistion, early ones had a lever, later had the button.

I also prefer a side loading bobbin rather than the more modern front load, and dimmer switches belong on the floor where God intended! old.gif 


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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorba
   and dimmer switches belong on the floor where God intended! old.gif 


I've tried, but I still haven't convinced my left foot that it's not there.

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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ke6cvh
Hello group,

  My White 77MG has separate adjustments for forward and reverse stitch length.  I always thought that was pretty slick.  I was just reading information on the old Frister and Rossman Cub 3 which is going to be identical to some of the other Kenmore portable machines and noted someone's comment that the reverse stitch length was fixed and not the same as the forward.  Now I'm wondering if my Kenmore 158.1060 and Frister and Rossman Cub 7 (same basic machine) also have this issue of fixed reverse stitch length or adjustable.  Something new to try out tomorrow. I would think because it has reverse type stretch stitches that are adjusted through the stitch length then the reverse is adjustable but just want to be certain. 
 
  My 1917 Davis NVF has a back tack push button on it and the Wheeler and Wilson no 12 from the 1890's had one as well but that's an industrial.

Best regards,
Mike


That is a really neat feature on the White - wondering about how this came about and the practicality.  I can't think of too many applications that would need separate stitch lengths for forward and reverse but having this option sure makes it highly flexible.  You'll have to update us when you know about your Kenmore.

A 1917 Davis with a push button for back tack?  Wow!  I'll have to look that up.  
Thanks for the info.
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #7 
Jim and Zorba,

Glad to know I'm not alone in not liking buttons for reverse. It seems then that Viking and the Japanese started this and maybe Necchi got on board with marketing push buttons as the wave of the future and then it caught on with many many of the later designs.

Thanks for this info.  

And Zorba,  I like you also prefer a side loading bobbin -another thread for another day!
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #8 
I'm definitely in the minority here but I prefer the push button. Probably because that's what I grew up with so it's what I'm used to. Every time I use a machine with the lever I catch myself looking for the button with my right thumb lol.

Cari

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #9 
Push button reverse is what our workhorse machine had that we used for about 30 years, and it drove me nuts. Biggest complaint is that I have to hold the button in the whole time it's in reverse. If I was working on something with thick layers, like the collar, cape and body with lining of a Civil War Melton cloth overcoat, it was hard enough to try to manhandle all of that material plus have to have to push the bleeding button in! At least most levers will remain in place when they are moved, but not all. Some are spring loaded. The other part I hated about push button reverse is that it was not hard to push the button and wind up pushing the machine away from me. 

The other thing about levers is that they can vary. Most all Singer type machines have levers with reverse on the up, forward on the down, but some of my German machines are exactly opposite - forward is up, reverse is down. It's always a bit of a chore to re-orient myself to the machine I'm using, and I have a lot of machines, and remember what is what for each sewing session. Still, all things considered, I prefer the lever over the button. 

-Bruce
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorba
I VASTLY prefer a lever reverse - the pushbutton is a nuisance. As Jim notes, the Toyotas bridged the transistion, early ones had a lever, later had the button.


Brother had both for several years. I can tell you that in '56, all 5 Brother models sold in the US had levers. By '59, only one did, all the others had the button. Don't know about earlier or later because I don't have full model line up ads.

Cari

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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #11 
This conversation reminds me of one of my many pet peeves, this one about computer keyboards. The IDIOT that moved the control key from its time honored position next to the "A" key, and put it in a completely useless location at the bottom of the keyboard. WHY? I've been hacking keyboard drivers ever since, and even fixed it in hardware in one instance.
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #12 
This, Zorba, we have in common.  I have a directory somewhere full of caps/control swapping solutions for various OSes and hardware.  One of the first device drivers I ever wrote was to allow swapping those keys on Unix PC that AT&T was putting out.  I still backspace with ctrl-H.

paul
who also prefers reverse levers over buttons.

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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #13 
I often use ^H as well.
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