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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #1251 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaly
Great tutorial, Cari - thanks for passing this along.  I take it you use bias binding for all your quilting?  I'm a big fan of using bias just because of the flexibility and stretch you can get when fitting around curves - but it's new to me that it wears better.  Using the continuous method - I see no disadvantage to using bias over straight from a fabric usage point of view. I love this method - so easy and only need to do seaming once instead of  connecting all those strips.


My favorite part of quilting is hunting for just the right stripe to use for the bias binding. Most of my quilts have striped binding, the only ones that don't are the ones that I couldn't find the right colored striped fabric. I like the continuous method for the same reason you do - one seam. And it always amazes me just how much binding you get from one small piece of fabric.
Here's a couple of baby quilts I made years ago that you can see the bindings -
S5031859.jpg 
S5032438.jpg 

Cari


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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #1252 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaly
I used my Rocketeer on an upholstery project and this machine delivered perfectly - from making the cording to sewing all the really thick seams with the cording and extra seam allowance.  I think it's good to rotate machine use for projects to get them moving and not just sitting - this makes the machine a better performer for me.  And this was the perfect project for my Rocketeer.

I've only made pillows or outdoor cushions so this was a new experience for me.  I was stunned at how expensive upholstery  fabric is.  We brought a thrift store chair that had good support and a frame and decided it would be the perfect oversized chair for our office.  The fabric we liked had about 1 yard less than I calculated  - but we took a chance thinking I could always use a contrasting fabric for the cording.

Off to my vintage books to see how best to optimize fabric use and I came across the method to make continuous binding - one 36" wide yard of fabric will make 24 yards of 1.5" bias strips. This was perfect (I needed 20 yards)- I conserved fabric and even have almost a yard left over - enough for some pillows.

The directions are from my 1943 Singer Home Decoration Guide.  If you search online there are also videos and tutorials for this method - search "continuous bias binding."  . . . .           


Chaly, great upholstery job.  If I could get to it, I'd take photos -- I re-upholstered a Love Seat -- it was given to me about 20 years by my former boss -- the colors of the upholstery were terrible, but I re-did it, including corded pillows, with zippers.  It was a massive job, and it still looks very good -- it's not been used a lot.  I used my Singer 328-K -- I've had it since Christmas of 1963 (my DH who is now deceased bought it as my Christmas Gift the first Christmas we were married.  The machine is and always has been a real work horse -- I can't tell you how many sets of drapers I've made with it, plus the upholstery work on that Love Seat -- if I can ever get rid of other people's junk in my house, I'll take photos. I was pretty proud of the job  I did, being a rank amateur at upholstery.  You did a great job!

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Jeanette Frantz, Ocala, Florida
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #1253 
Continuous bias binding...hmmm...and dumb me, I only used it on one quilt because of scalloped edges.  I'll have to start remembering to make it that way more often and try the striped fabric.  Love the result!

Great upholstery project.  As much as I love the result, I can't get excited about doing one of those projects again.  Too many memories of sore back, punctured fingers and struggling from beginning to end.  My daughter still has that chair, though!

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #1254 
Cari - What a special result using striped fabric for a bias binding - I'll definitely remember this.  And very beautiful quilts.

Jeanette - I'd love to see your upholstery work if you have a chance for a picture. That must have been a big project and another testament to our vintage machines for performing as we need them.  I've heard the 328 is a very strong and consistent workhorse but I have not had the pleasure to have one to use.

Mavis - I can relate to your woes as it was not too fun for me to do the stapling part.  Likely I won't be planning too many chairs but the cushions and pillows I don't mind.

Stacy - I've never thought about storing fabric folded on the bias - great idea!
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #1255 
Quote:
Originally Posted by morningstar
That would be wonderful to do ! Starting In the mid seventies we wintered
In Nokomis for 8 yrs. So I do know the area .


Pls keep me updated on your plans and just PM me when you are in the area.
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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #1256 
Does mending count?
Today I managed to mend a few spots where the fabric had escaped from the binding of this quilt after a few washes. It was my first quilt, started around 2001 and after a huge lapse in sewing, finished in 2012 when I got back into sewing again. And why did I get back into sewing? A certain little green Singer VSM I found in a junk shop deserves the full credit. 😁


Anyway, let's just say it was interesting and at times perplexing having Experienced Quilter Me repairing something that Novice Quilter Me sewed...lol. But I was successful at mending it! I was expecting to perhaps need to do some applique but was able to mend it by undoing the binding and reattaching it in 3 different places, one of which was nearly a foot long, and I am very happy with the results. This is a newby quilt with lots of mistakes and imperfections but I love it. ❤️

Attached Images
jpeg IMG_20200630_151824071.jpg (519.64 KB, 9 views)


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Kim
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #1257 
Good repair work, Kim!  Perplexing is a good exercise for our brains!  Good for you to stay with it and save that quilt.
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Mavis
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #1258 
Kim that's a pretty quilt, good for you getting the repairs done easily. I always wash quilts I make at least once so if something like that happens I catch it and repair it before it gets gifted.

Cari

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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #1259 
Thanks! Yep, I wash my quilts before gifting now too. 🙂 But when I first started quilting I was afraid to wash them. I'm not sure when these mistakes showed up, but I remember that this being my very first quilt I didn't want to wash it at first so it was babied and wasn't washed for a few years and then wasn't washed again for a few years. It's needed this repair for a couple of years at least but it seems there's always a more important project in the queue! LOL. Of course as soon as I washed it I fell in love with it even more because I love the soft wrinkly look and feel. 🙂 Now I look forward to washing my quilts. 😁
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Kim
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #1260 
Kim - a very pretty quilt!  Glad you were successful with the repair.  I think we treasure those things we make and after a while any mistakes are just part of the charm.  If we want perfect, a factory or machine can do the work (and these are not always without mistakes)! And along our journey of sewing, as we become more proficient, it's fun to evaluate our first efforts - shows us just how far we are progressing.  Thanks for sharing.
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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #1261 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaly
Kim - a very pretty quilt!  Glad you were successful with the repair.  I think we treasure those things we make and after a while any mistakes are just part of the charm.  If we want perfect, a factory or machine can do the work (and these are not always without mistakes)! And along our journey of sewing, as we become more proficient, it's fun to evaluate our first efforts - shows us just how far we are progressing.  Thanks for sharing.


Very well put, Chaly! I so agree! I look at this quilt with my wonky first attempts at meandering FMQ (using my 15-30 treadle) and I love it even though it isn't very good - I think you're right, it's part of the charm - and memories of the journey's beginning. [smile]

p.s. I just recently found your thread in the Quilting Corner about Free-Motion-Quilting Firsts and can't wait to comment on your awesome quilt and FMQ! [biggrin]

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Kim
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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #1262 
Cari, I love your stripey bindings! I have yet to try that, but I do have a quilt planned with Riley Blake elf fabric that has coordinating stripey prints and I bought some I think with a border in mind, but now I am thinking binding! [wink]
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Kim
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MarlenaL

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Reply with quote  #1263 
Sewing machine from 1970.
Pattern from 1975.
Sewist from slightly later. [cool]
The chainstitch adapter went in to handle the smaller size seams on what was one of the early multi-size Big 4 patterns. I'll also run some fraying towels' edges through the machine while it's still installed, as the factory chainstitch is giving way.

The treadle is calling to me for my next project, which isn't going to be something for myself. That one has a fragment of personality, I swear, where the others don't. It wants to be of service to others. I personally don't, it can't be an impulse coming from here. [confused]
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Cecilia

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Reply with quote  #1264 
Made with my green Singer 319k:

Lobster mask in lobster trap pouch
Cosmetic bag, lobsters inside, traps outside
Reversible mask; wearer can trap the lobsters, or not!

The 319k is my new favourite machine!!!

Attached Images
jpeg FB52DD78-0B62-4ECD-9655-F2EB6ACF7005.jpeg (466.09 KB, 14 views)
jpeg C38762CB-5338-4B16-A571-1345A59F8A36.jpeg (471.77 KB, 13 views)
jpeg 34E4D60D-E1AC-40E8-935D-6BA881FB22B5.jpeg (310.02 KB, 13 views)
jpeg D6080060-8A5F-479B-A2C2-761B5F430B0B.jpeg (480.40 KB, 13 views)


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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #1265 
What a fun mask and clever pouch, Cecillia! Glad to see you are enjoying your 319K!
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Kim
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morningstar

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Reply with quote  #1266 
Well I broke down and sold my treadle to a friend. She is so happy bc of memories.
Her girl already put name on it for the future. Then I gave her my 1952 White Rotary
both had all attachments and manuals. Now the 15 yr old grandson says he wants that
one since he can’t have treadle. His gammon born in 1952 so both are happy.

I still have more vintage machines and try to sew every day.

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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #1267 
How wonderful to have family who are eager to have and use some of your machines! It's great to be able to pass them on to the younger generation!
I know when the time comes, my older son "Sprocket" will want my Frister & Rossman hand crank and my Necchi Supernova. He used my Necchi BU, Singer 15-30 treadle, and Frister & Rossman hand crank to sew a backpack for a design class in college. (Art major) My younger son has put his name on my late model 99 in the mid-century cabinet. [smile]

Just a little brag on my boy and the machines which sewed the leather straps easily of course:

Spencer frister & rossman.jpg  Spencer's backpack from R post.jpg  Spencer's backpack R post 2.jpg


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Kim
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morningstar

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Reply with quote  #1268 
As it happens another mutual friend ..83 yrs old told us that her grandfather
Worked at the Singer Kilbournie factory ...outside Glasgow...until 1915.
Well the treadle I sold was a Singer model 127 made in 1915 but the records
showed it being made in Quebec, Canada which makes sense to us here.

I only sold it to friend bc she really wanted it and I need room but both of us
commented that we had no idea her family would like them. Shows you just
never know bc I had no one interested when I advertised it few yrs ago.
Even the Mennonite ladies here wanted electric with zig zag when I sold an
Older machine .

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Cecilia

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Reply with quote  #1269 
Kim, WOW, that backpack is incredible- what neatness and detail!!!!!!!
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #1270 
Fantastic job on that backpack! What a talented young man!

Cari

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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #1271 
Thanks Cecilia and Cari!  He really is so talented in anything 3-dimensional and working with his hands. His major was Art with an emphasis on Sculpture and Ceramics. His new FIL got him into the union so he's a rigger in the entertainment industry - great money and he took to it like a duck to water,  but he's an out of work rigger now so he's been helping me put together the bobbin winders that baffled me [biggrin] and all manner of other things around the ranchette. 
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Kim
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NigheanRuadh

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Reply with quote  #1272 
The fitted sheet of the set that my son uses had a small hole in it (that I didn't know about), and he ended up catching his foot in it and tearing a large hole.  When I examined it, I found that the entire middle of the sheet was too worn to support a patch.  I had recently retired the flat sheet from a king-size set, because the top portion of it had gotten thing and developed a hole.  However, I saved it, because the bottom portion still had lots of good fabric.  I determined that it was enough to cut a twin sheet across the width and used my Pfaff 130 to sew the seams and elastic casing.  Ribbon "tags" in the ends make it easier to orient the sheet correctly on the bed.  My son can still use the top sheet and pillowcase from his set with the new sheet.

IMG_20200715_112836.jpg 
IMG_20200715_172841.jpg


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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #1273 
Love this! Great save! (a woman after my own heart) Fabulous job on that gusset! So nice for him to be able to keep using those cool sheets! [love]

So happy to see you posting, Nighean - I really enjoy seeing your projects, but I forget to check in on your blog often enough. [smile]

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Kim
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #1274 
Great work. I repurpose sheets too. I buy cute sheets that are new or like new at thrift stores to cut down and make crib sheets and pack n play sheets. You can get 4 pack n play sheets from one full or queen size sheet.

Cari

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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #1275 
What a great idea, Cari. I'd almost forgotten - when my son was a toddler I took our flannel flat sheet with lots of life left in it and made a comforter cover for his toddler bed (my MIL had given me a comforter that had been my DH's). It was a really cute farm animal theme and the pillow case completed the ensemble. [smile] This was early in my sewing career when I had little experience and no one to teach me so I was especially proud of it at the time. 
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Kim
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morningstar

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Reply with quote  #1276 
I always want to reply quickly but I have to resign in because the login
Doesn’t stay.
I found that backpack great job. Young man has great future.
I too have repurposed sheets sometimes for the local Homeless Shelter.
You did a much better job . I had trouble trying to get a white king fit my
Queen size with a good fit at the corners. Usable but not perfect.
Such a nice set you did good to make the fitted.

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NigheanRuadh

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Reply with quote  #1277 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageGalKim
Love this! Great save! (a woman after my own heart) Fabulous job on that gusset! So nice for him to be able to keep using those cool sheets! [love]

So happy to see you posting, Nighean - I really enjoy seeing your projects, but I forget to check in on your blog often enough. [smile]


I haven't updated the blog in months, Kim.  [smile]  Too much going on to keep up with it.  I haven't even really been sewing for quite awhile.  I was glad to be able to do this project, though, and use the good part of the king sheet as well as provide a new sheet for our boy.

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NigheanRuadh

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Reply with quote  #1278 
Thanks for the comments, everyone!!  This is the third fitted sheet I've made.  I made a set of toddler bed sheets and another twin fitted sheet from a queen set.
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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #1279 
Well I understand how that goes! Thanks for taking the time to share your upcycling project with us - they are always inspiring! 
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Kim
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #1280 
Kim - beautiful backpack design and how special it was crafted with a hand crank!  Thanks for sharing!
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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #1281 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaly
Cari - What a special result using striped fabric for a bias binding - I'll definitely remember this.  And very beautiful quilts.

Jeanette - I'd love to see your upholstery work if you have a chance for a picture. That must have been a big project and another testament to our vintage machines for performing as we need them.  I've heard the 328 is a very strong and consistent workhorse but I have not had the pleasure to have one to use.

Mavis - I can relate to your woes as it was not too fun for me to do the stapling part.  Likely I won't be planning too many chairs but the cushions and pillows I don't mind.

Stacy - I've never thought about storing fabric folded on the bias - great idea!


When I started this project to completely re-do the Love Seat, I couldn't get a staple to penetrate the wooden framework.  The first thing I did was strip it down to the framework and springs (which are hand-tied).   My DH bought me a staple gun powered by an air compressor -- that's a lot easier to handle.   Without it, I would probably have burned that doggone Love Seat!  lol!

EDIT:  I will eventually get a picture taken and post it -- but I'm scheduled for surgery August 10 and I'm really struggling with the spinal pain.  I think this is the closest I've ever been to hell.  Please pardon my language!

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Jeanette Frantz, Ocala, Florida
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #1282 
Jeanette - hang in there and best for your pending surgery.  Thanks for the info on the stapler - I think a pro one is the only way to go if one is doing serious upholstery.
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morningstar

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Reply with quote  #1283 
I am a believer of using the old or vintage machines. But, yesterday had
an issue. Needed a zig zag but my Kenmore model has never worked since I bought it.
Ok, now I have the manual I thought I was ok. No, I think the 2 round dials that must
turn ...must be frozen, locked together. At least I know what they should do.
Tried to think of other machine to use...5 of them don’t do zig zag.

Well it was not a big job so I gave up and sewed straight lines. When a friend heard
she offered me her vintage Kenmore . Too much work to bring it here. I find it
aggravating because this machine has the capabilities and I do use zig zag .
Think I will look from the inside to try and loosen.

For now I need to get rid of the mouse I saw in that screen room last night. Naturally,
I have sewing stuff out there that I need today.

J. Frantz...I will pray your surgery works. Sewing a holder for my ice packs for my back.
Favorite part of my day reading Victoriansweatshop.

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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #1284 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaly
Jeanette - hang in there and best for your pending surgery.  Thanks for the info on the stapler - I think a pro one is the only way to go if one is doing serious upholstery.


As I wrote in my previous post, seriously, I would have burned the wooden frame of that love seat if I'd had to fasten the staples with nothing by a hand stapler.  Just as "Armstrong Steering" doesn't work well for a large vehicle, a manual hand stapler, in this case, just wouldn't work.  Seriously, though, my husband was an extremely talented cabinet maker and wood worker, also built bedroom furniture including a sit-down dresser with three large drawers on each side, a 5 drawer Chest of Drawers, and 2 matching night stands (he passed away in 2004).  He definitely believed that one needs to have the right tools for the job and he knew from trying the manual hand stapler himself that it just wasn't going to work! 

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Jeanette Frantz, Ocala, Florida
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Reply with quote  #1285 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThayerRags
My wife has been making what she calls “Shirt-Tale Bears” for about 15 years now.  Their purpose is to provide a physical stuffed bear for grieving family members to hold onto made out of garments worn by loved ones that they miss.  When she began, she made them only out of shirts, but over the years has branched out to include other garments such as a house coat, T-shirts, dresses, dish towels, shorts, skirts, jackets, sweaters, a real fur coat (leather), pajamas, and a woman’s suit.  

She’s used four sewing machines that should all qualify as “vintage” beginning with a 1990 JC Penney 7057, then 1959 Singer 404, then 1958 Singer 401A, and currently a 1956 Singer 301A.  She makes the bears in three sizes, 18, 20, and 22 inch, but most are the 22” size.  Here are photos of her 185th Shirt-Tale Bear made out of a lady’s sweater this week.  It's 22" tall.

CD in Oklahoma

STBear_185a.jpg 
STBear_185b.jpg 
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morningstar

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Reply with quote  #1286 
Oh, this is such a nice charity work. You sure do make nice bears. Never been
my thing bit I am glad some do them.

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Kathleen 
 
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