Victorian Sweatshop Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
SteveH-VSS

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 5,178
Reply with quote  #1 
I just posted in the garment construction section a catalog produced by the Domestic Sewing Machine Company.  This was a gift Heather got for Christmas this year.

I have not found a single date anywhere on this other then to say that the next edition would be out on September 1st.....

an AMAZING number of dress,skirt,blouse,jacket, etc designs... 24 pages of them in fact.

https://www.victoriansweatshop.com/post/domestic-catalog-of-fashion-patterns-date-unknown-10388715



__________________
Antioch, California
0
ChattyKathy

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 260
Reply with quote  #2 
I love all those garments.   Just amazing to see them as patterns.  

Poor child that would have to wear the “back brace”.  Finally, finally I see a picture of what a “drawer” actually looks like.  

I just can not imagine sewing these even with a  sewing machine.  They all look so complicated.  

And prior to sewing machine introduction, these types of intricate patterns were done by hand.  I do some hand sewing, but nothing that would qualify me to sew any of these patterns. I also wonder what type of hand sewn stitch would hold these styles securely enough that they would not come apart?  I mean would every stitch have to be a sew one stitch forward and one stitch back?  Then a longer stitch forward and then a small back again?  This was a stitch taught to me by my Mom for holding something fast.  Granted she was not a seamstress but she did do our clothing maintenance at home when I was a child. (We did not have a sewing machine.)  

I can definitely understand why a garment would take 2 weeks to hand sew by a seamstress or tailor. But with advent of sewing machine same garment would take about 1-2 days.  
I have seen hand quilting they are basically a running stitch and every so often a back stitch.  

I love all these styles but wonder about how well they were held up sewn by hand?  

__________________
Kathy
Near the WI/IL border
0
JonesHand52

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 486
Reply with quote  #3 
Being a Domestic sewing machine fan (my first coffin top treadle is a Domestic c.early 1880s) and collecting a lot of trade cards and other ephemera, I would date the Domestic pattern catalog at about early to mid 1870s. There are a lot of the styles shown that are reminiscent of the 1860s ones I am well familiar with having done Civil War era living history displays and re-enactments, but are no longer the wide hoop skirts and A frame jackets and top coats. These are now slimmer and more stylish while incorporating many of the same overall styles. We see the beginnings of the bustles that were very pronounced in the late 1870s and into the 1880s, but the early introductions we see here are more just ruffle embellishments. Note that the patterns, as usual, are all geared to women's and children's styles. Apparently, men's garments were not "appropriate" for the wife to sew. 

As to hand sewing, Butterick has an excellent book that came out in 1911, second edition in 1916 - the one I have - that shows how to construct garments using Butterick patterns and has the first chapters dealing with all of the hand sewing stitches. Nowhere in the book does it mention sewing machines that I can find and no illustrations of any. They have several stitches going from running stitch, back stitch, half back stitch and combination stitch. 

As to sewing a straight garment seam, one can do the standard running stitch, but a stitch to be seen in the finished garment, and a much more solid stitch, is to make a stitch (to start), then to back to the start of the stitch (back stitch) and put the needle in, coming out with the first stitch about half way in this second stitch. Back stitch again to the first stitch and continue. It's like a running loop the loop stitch - stitch, back stitch, stitch, back stitch. The stitch you will see on top will look like a line of machine stitching. I believe I read somewhere this is called a Hamburg stitch. I actually used this on one of my Civil War uniforms and got asked how in the world I managed to do this on the machine. Fact is, I didn't. I used the Hamburg stitch and did it by hand and it looked like a machine stitch, but if you look closely, you would see the stitches are not all exactly even. Also, this type of stitch will stretch a bit which is nice. 

The experts at using the old fashioned needle and thread only were some of the die hard Confederate re-enactors. Many in the South didn't have sewing machines, they said, so their uniforms were sewn by hand! So there! 

The Butterick book shows up from time to time on eBay and other sites. It's The Dressmaker, The Butterick Publishing Company (1911, 1916). I have some other Butterick books that are Dover reprints in soft cover going back to the early 1900s, but this one is an original hard bound copy. I actually found 2 of them and got one to fit in the leg cabinets of a White Family Rotary treadle in the Grand Mission (aka Arts & Crafts) style cabinet, but gave the book to a friend when I sold him the treadle. Not to worry, White lovers - I still have 2 White treadles! One FR and one VS treadle. 

-  Bruce
0
seb58

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 215
Reply with quote  #4 
Wow what a piece! I love those garments, really elaborate...
I've been looking around and it seems the style corresponds to the "Natural Form Era" that is early 1880s (see Izabela Pitcher from Prior Attire's video 
)
0
JonesHand52

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 486
Reply with quote  #5 
The Domestic sewing machine shown inside the back cover of the catalog matches the one from the early 1870s in a flyer I downloaded years ago from the Smithsonian. There is a penciled note on it that says "c.1870-74.

- Bruce SIL10-808-1a.jpg 

0
SteveH-VSS

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 5,178
Reply with quote  #6 
Love the feedback , thanks!
__________________
Antioch, California
0
ChattyKathy

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 260
Reply with quote  #7 
Bruce,
I guess my Mom taught me the “Hamburg stitch”...she was raised in Hungary so would no doubt know that stitch.  Thanks for the hand sewing info...fascinating!!!
The “videos” are truly another experience to understanding daily life.

__________________
Kathy
Near the WI/IL border
0
SteveH-VSS

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 5,178
Reply with quote  #8 
Narrowing in on a date!

On page 02 Inside cover there is the mention of dates for reviews of April 1878 and June 1878!!!!!  Spotted by a FB friend. 

__________________
Antioch, California
0
JonesHand52

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 486
Reply with quote  #9 
I found that the Domestic pattern catalog does have some patterns for men, but only a couple of them - mostly shirts, a pair of drawers and a couple of utility overalls and smocks plus a "smoking" or lounge jacket. It's only the bottom half of the last page in the catalog, of course. 

I have a lot of these types of patterns from previous living history gigs that I could copy and modify if I wanted to. I already have some vintage style trousers cut out to sew. Old pot bellied men like me look like crap in cowboy clothes, so I am going real Old West with button fly, high waisted, adjusting belt in the back trousers that use suspenders. And, yes, I do make my own suspenders too. Commercially made ones are expensive and generally I don't like them. 

I see they have a Scotch Cap pattern for boys. I have several patterns for men's caps such as this plus the pillbox and "Chinese" smoking caps. Those come in handy in the cold months for bare-domed guys like me, even in the house. 

-Bruce
0
SteveH-VSS

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 5,178
Reply with quote  #10 
I just bought this on EBay, but i am afraid that it is just the flyer part, not the pattern, but this does show up on one of the pages so it is still cool
[s-l1600]

__________________
Antioch, California
0
seb58

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 215
Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS
Narrowing in on a date!

On page 02 Inside cover there is the mention of dates for reviews of April 1878 and June 1878!!!!!  Spotted by a FB friend. 


I should learn to read the small prints! Way to go!!! 
Probably advertising the fashion for Autumn 1878 
Looking back on it, this catalogue seems to be aimed at the (Upper) Middle Class, there is hardly any advertisement for fancy evening gown / opera gown / ball gown etc...
0
Zorba

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,039
Reply with quote  #12 
Niiiiice! Love, LOVE some of the skirts! Interesting corsetry too.
__________________
-Zorba
"The Veiled Male"
http://www.doubleveil.net
0
Yaruheltrebor

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #13 
Amazing. I can’t imagine taking a pattern home & actually making some of those garments. Thanks for posting it. 
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.