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socoso

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Reply with quote  #1 
Which one should I keep? I feel like I should keep one or the other. Both are in very good shape inside and out with internal belts in great condition. The Pfaff has a cabinet and some attachments and the Adler only has 1 cam with little hope of finding others. The Adler was my first vintage machine but...
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #2 
List them both for sale and see which one sells. Then, keep the other one. =)
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Threadedchaos

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Reply with quote  #3 
I would keep the pfaff 130. I have used both machines and found the 130 to be nearly bulletproof. I restored my mother's and it can sew everything from heavy jeans to lycra spandex with a perfect stitch. even zigzag without tunneling the lighter weight fabric. The Adler is close, but you are right about the cams. I have 2 adlers and one has the push-in cam and the other screw-in. Each one has issues including a missing cleated belt. I find the 130 far more easier to use and less fussy. On the plus side parts are easier to come by for the pfaff, including the belt. If all you need are cams for the Adler and it has no other issues, keep it as well if u have the room. Maybe someday that cam windfall will happen.
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socoso

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Reply with quote  #4 
As I can't seem to find an Adler 189A for sale anywhere maybe it's time to sell it.
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Son of A Singer Man

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hi,

        I would keep the PFAFF 130. Years ago, I bought a ADLER 189A sewing machine from a 'Charlatan' on eBay. When it arrived at my home, I found the machine completely frozen and its synthetic timing belt was disintegrated into a very fine granular dust and many very thin nylon bands that were still in place around the pulleys. The eBay seller "Craig The Cat" very carefully worded the ad's description to hide the fact that the machine was in such a state.

         In searching for a replacement timing belt for the machine, I found out that the belt was NLA. I suspect that the synthetic timing belt was intentionally engineered with a limited life span... which would render the machine useless when the timing belt failed.

        There was no Buyer Protection Plan in place on eBay at that time, so I decided to 'cut my losses' and disassemble the machine for parts. It was during that disassembly, I found that the needle bar was broken in half... the break was hidden by the 'boss' in the casting where it would have moved up & down during the machine's operation. How a break like that could happen still remains a mystery to me.  

         The remains of the machine eventually went to the Scrap Metal Yard.

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socoso

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Reply with quote  #6 
It is a shame that the Adlers end up scrapped because the belt is very difficult (impossible?) to replace. The belt on mine is fine and I just found a matching tin with a bunch of presser feet so I guess I'm keeping both for now. Now to find some cams LOL.
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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #7 
I wonder if that guy on eBay that rebuilds Pfaff belts could do an Adler?
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Threadedchaos

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Reply with quote  #8 
Its possible he could, tho i've never inquired if he could or even how he's making the current ones. I did make my own for the Adler using nylon string and copper wire for cleats. its ugly. but works and more importantly is quiet, witch means its working well. its never popped out or changed timing so its good enough till i have the sources to make a more neater one. One thing to note. there is 1 "plastic" gear in the transfer case that moves the main drive motion to the bobbin. It is translucent and far more robust than i imagined ( i have no idea what it's made of). A few teeth were mangled in mine and i had a very hard time setting it straight and even so, there is a bit of knock so its not meshing quite flush. (this is the rotary model, there is a different mechanism for the oscillator model)
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