Victorian Sweatshop Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Swagbag36

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi, just a query, would you say using a overlocker/ serger is a good addition to the making of quilts? I am a novice to quilt making so not sure, I do use a machine and now have a serious addiction to collecting older machines and bringing them back to life. I do enjoy reading the question and answers on this site and have had many good ideas and help from all of you...
So thankyou...
0
WI Lori

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,338
Reply with quote  #2 
My SIL took a "how to use your serger " class when she bought her serger. One of the projects was making a rail fence quilt with server seams, flat, on the right side of the fabric. It looked ok. To my knowledge, she has not made another with the server.

I use mine to finish the edges on receiving blankets, construct lighter weight tote bags, and finish seams in garment construction.

I have a love to hate it relationship with my mid 1990s serger. When its good, its very good. When its bad, its horrible. It is not an auto thread, and the way the tension discs are made, it is very easy for a thread to pop out of the discs, and not catch it until some inches later, when checking the seam.

I'd upgrade it, but I don't love it or use it enough, to bother! ;/

__________________
Lori in Wisconsin
0
Swagbag36

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #3 
Thankyou for that, I shall think on what you said and decide what to do.....
0
OurWorkbench

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,212
Reply with quote  #4 
I'm not a quilter, nor have I played one on TV. [wink]

If I was, I would not piece with a serger as it seems that there would be too much bulk/thread in the seam.  I did see one that may work well with a serger, as that is how it was demonstrated.  I finally found the method that I remembered at
I thought about it once a long time ago, but not with the dimensions given.  I thought that maybe a quilted panel would work well in the center.  It almost reminds me of a comforter, rather than a quilt.

Also, a serger would be good for finishing the edges of yardage to prewash it.

Janey

__________________
Janey & John
0
Zorba

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,039
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WI Lori

I use mine to finish the edges on receiving blankets, construct lighter weight tote bags, and finish seams in garment construction.

I have a love to hate it relationship with my mid 1990s serger. When its good, its very good. When its bad, its horrible. It is not an auto thread, and the way the tension discs are made, it is very easy for a thread to pop out of the discs, and not catch it until some inches later, when checking the seam.

I'd upgrade it, but I don't love it or use it enough, to bother! ;/

I could have written this...
I have a 1992 Pfaff 776 with the tension knobs facing the operator - you have to jack your head around to the  side of the machine to verify the thread is between the disks - which is why newer ones have sideways dials and disks! When its good, its good. When its bad, YOU ARE HATING LIFE!

I use mine fairly frequently - its fantastic for putting edges on dance veils, hems on skirts, anything where I want a nice, neat, and sturdy edge on fabric. I often serge edge fabric pieces before sewing them together, although I'm rarely brave enough to actually serge things together - its just too fast and not precise enough for me. I will on rare occasions though - particularly on projects where a bit of deviation won't matter, such as skirt gores.

I will probably end up spending the $2,500 on a Babylock or similar with the air driven threading - because when you have to do a total rethread of this thing (4 thread), $2,500 seems like chump change at the time! And sometimes the only thing to do is to completely unthread the thing, cuss at it heartily, then re-thread it.

__________________
-Zorba
"The Veiled Male"
http://www.doubleveil.net
0
Cari-in-Oly

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,953
Reply with quote  #6 
Zorba Babylock isn't the only serger with air threading any more so you can likely find one that costs less using the same technology now.

Cari

__________________
Olympia Washington
0
Jim/Steelsewing

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,389
Reply with quote  #7 
We have a serger. It's a Brother. My Sister got it brand new five years ago. She's opened the box. That's it so far.
__________________
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
0
Swagbag36

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #8 
Thankyou everyone, all good ideas. I watched the video and again I picked up ideas, so thanks Our Workbench... Still thinking about it and perhaps one day I may upload pictures.....
0
Mavis

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,069
Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim/Steelsewing
We have a serger. It's a Brother. My Sister got it brand new five years ago. She's opened the box. That's it so far.
. Mine was a little one from Wall-Mart (many yrs. ago.). Got it out of the box. Think it's back in the box somewhere in the basement.  Intimidated me too much to ever try it out!  Maybe I'lll get it going one of these days!

__________________
Mavis
from Minnesota
0
pgf

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,216
Reply with quote  #10 
You all are really selling me on the idea of getting a serger!  :-)

So...  the things that a serger can do:  do you simply not do those things (and using binding, or more clever seam construction instead), or do you instead use overcast or zigzag as a substitute?



__________________
My machines: http://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/by-age
0
WI Lori

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,338
Reply with quote  #11 
I remember pinking in highschool to reduce seam allowance raveling on wovens. For knits, a zz stitch could help reduce curling.
__________________
Lori in Wisconsin
0
charley26

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 633
Reply with quote  #12 
I have not used one, but really wanted one for use with dressmaking knits/jersey etc, now that I am more confident and building sewing skills. I found one on Ebay (after Christmas) for a little money, but good name, janome, not too old, no power cord, or any tools. I decided on a professional service for it from my local sewing shop, and that bought the total cost up to £110. I found a manual online, and spent a lot of time on Youtube looking at 'how tos' while the machine was away. Luckily, it came back threaded, so all I had to do was knot the new thread in and practice. I could use the foot pedal from my small janome sewing machine, so all good. I have been practising and I am feeling more comfortable using it as each day goes by. I have a couple of tweezers and cleaning brushes, so I am feeling ok and, looking forward to learning/teaching myself more about it's uses.
My next task is to learn how to rethread it so that it, and me become more acquainted!

__________________
Marie
In the beautiful Wye valley. 
0
Zorba

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,039
Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by charley26
My next task is to learn how to rethread it so that it, and me become more acquainted!

Follow the manual EXACTLY, and you'll be fine. You'll probably cuss the lower looper, but you'll be fine!

__________________
-Zorba
"The Veiled Male"
http://www.doubleveil.net
0
samiamaquilter

Member
Registered:
Posts: 30
Reply with quote  #14 
I had a lengthy reply to this thread done and then my Mac just ate it. Must have been hungry since I can not find it anywhere. Anyway, I have 3 sergers but only use them for clothing construction and each has a different colored thread on it. I would never piece with it since I am very very precise in my piecing and you just can't be using a serger. Also there is the issue of all that thread on the edge that would leave a lump on the side to which you iron the seam. One Bernina 334D, which sat in a closet for 15 years as it started giving me fits and I did not know how to mess with it. After I started working on sewing machined I decided that I was going to get over my fear of the serger. With the help, by e-mail and photos, from a dear friend who is a sewing machine tech in another state, I was able to adjust the loopers. I was over my fear of them since I understood them better and I even worked on someone else's machine that had user issue problems. She had actually driven her needle through the presser foot...Of the 3, 2 are Bernina's (one given to me by husband of friend who passed away) and one given to me by a quilting friend who knew I was having issues with mine. It had been her mothers. Of the 3, I like the White the best since it is easier to thread. The whole front opens up to see the loopers where ever they are. It has a lever on the side to release all the tension guides and then put them back where they were. On the other two, I have to dial down each dial to 0 and then dial back up to where it was which I don't ever remember so I started using a sharpie to mark it.The White is also the only one with all metal gear in its guts and it is the same age as the Bernina 334D. I have the Bernina 2000 and it has nylon funky type gear in its guts. So most of them just sit since I don't do clothing construction much. Easier and cheaper to buy clothes at Wal-Mart or get at a thrift store and adjust. I do use the serger to adjust clothes however.

Sammie quilter in NC


0
Farmhousesewer

Member
Registered:
Posts: 88
Reply with quote  #15 
I must admit I have had a Babylock for 30 years. If my husband could thread it, then it won out over the others. A few years ago I treated myself and upgraded to an 8 thread. I do wish I would have gotten a separate Coverstitch machine though. Purchased at the end of the 3rd day at a quilt show and it had been used in a class, so a Used machine. The worst part was the manual, which was about 4 pages and literally translated from Japanese. Oh Boy!

I have done everything from making a set of grass collection bags for our mower to taking up gowns to making covered weights to altering clothing. If you put the worth on how much you use it it may not be worth it, but for the jobs it does, it is worth a million. 

To me, similar to my portable blindstitch machine. 

__________________
Maria
Smoky Mountains of Tennessee
0
Chaly

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 896
Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgf
You all are really selling me on the idea of getting a serger!  :-)

So...  the things that a serger can do:  do you simply not do those things (and using binding, or more clever seam construction instead), or do you instead use overcast or zigzag as a substitute?




I have a Huskylock serger that mostly sits in the box.  I do lots of garment construction and rarely need to serge.  When really needed though it is nice.

The disadvantages to me are the threading (although now the newer machines have this issue mostly solved) the amount and type of thread that is needed (not as many choices or quality is an issue) , the thread bulk in the seam allowance, and lastly - the lack of precision when seaming (compared to a regular sewing machine).

If I need to overcast or when I sew with knits - my vintage Elna machines are my go-to for this work.  Their numerous types of overcast stitching you can do with the cams are fantastic and I can match the thread color and use less thread.  The disadvantage is that you don't overcast and cut in one operation (although this is usually not needed) and the speed is not as fast - again usually not an issue unless you are sewing yards and yards of seams/edges.  

My Elna's can perform for me coverstich quality double needle stitching for hem knits along with beautiful overcasting.  Photo is a recent project showing an overcast seam from my Elna 62C:

overcast stitch.jpg 




0
purplefiend

Member
Registered:
Posts: 73
Reply with quote  #17 
I have a Huskylock 910 serger, I've used it to make clothing and once used it to make a quilt top with just simple squares. I didn't like making quilt tops with the serger. 
The 910 has a lever that threads the lower looper for you and that makes threading much simpler.
Sharon Weaver
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.