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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #1 
This is an interesting article that discusses some of the things we have already said here, but with a few new thoughts (to me at least) like...

"“This is an Ikea and Target generation. They live minimally, much more so than the boomers. They don’t have the emotional connection to things that earlier generations did. And they’re more mobile. So they don’t want a lot of heavy stuff dragging down a move across country for a new opportunity.”"

http://www.mnn.com/your-home/remodeling-design/blogs/nobody-wants-family-heirlooms-any-more

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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #2 
That's so true. When my mom moved to assisted living she gave away a lot of her stuff...but none of the children wanted it. A niece took the china and silver, and I got G-Grandma's wedding ring quilt top (yay!), the brothers split up the WWII memorabilia, and the rest pretty much went to charity. After she passed, we went through what was left and almost everything went away, apart from some jewelry.

Now me and my DH are trying to pass on some of our stuff, but the kids don't want it. My son lives in a Seattle apartment and my daughter just doesn't need anything we have. So what will happen to my sewing machines? I hope I can find some young people who want them, someday. Or maybe they'll go to charity after I'm gone, but I'm going to enjoy the heck out of them before that!

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Margaret 
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macybaby

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Reply with quote  #3 
When DH and I retire,  we plan on moving south.   We'll hold an auction and leave with as little as possible.   That will be in another 10 years,  and lot of what we have now will be worn out, so we'll have gotten our money's worth out of it. 

I did really good about not "collecting" a lot of stuff until the death of my parents and DH's mom.  Now I have way to much "dead people's stuff" in my house.

    I accept that my sewing machine collecting was therapy for me dealing with family issues,  and I met a lot of interesting people in the process,  and I didn't spend money I couldn't afford to spend - so I don't regret any of it.  I know the sewing machines would go for nothing at an auction,  so I've got 10 years to find homes for them.



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David

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Reply with quote  #4 
I've already warned our kids.  "You want the inheritance, you take my crap as well."  Actually the sewing machines are the least of it.  The old supercomputers in storage, that's where the fun begins.
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David
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by David
I...The old supercomputers in storage, that's where the fun begins.


Hmmmm.. If they are not interested, have them contact me. I am curious as to the vintage....  (any reply can be taken to PM so as to not clog the thread here.)

I am an IT manager currently, and although your systems are probably MUCH older, I was in the USAF's first digital electronics class in 1979... ahh the memories.

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txmerlin

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Reply with quote  #6 
Not far behind you. The first system I had the pleasure of working on had 16k of plated wire memory with object card programs. You get real good with card sorters. Univac 9200.

Ken

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macybaby

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Reply with quote  #7 
On the subject of old computers - last night DH and I were watching an old "futuristic" movie, probably made in the 50's about life in the early 2000's

the fun part is the HUGE computer they have envisioned,  with oscilloscope type displays,  punch key and dial type input and all.   So totally different from what has happened in reality.    They also have some robots that were developed,  one can even give a report on weather conditions,  and everyone is very,  very impressed.

They also have a "world" government and fully staffed station on the moon.

BTW - this was Mystery Science Theater 3000 . . .  


 

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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #8 
MST is so fun!
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Lori in Wisconsin
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Sewnoma

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Reply with quote  #9 
I LOVE Sci Fi from the 50's & 60's.  I'm more of a reader than a watcher, and I love finding old sci fi books at thrift shops and garage sales - some of the cover art is amazing (and/or amazingly bad!)  Personal computers and personal transportation are the two things I'm always most curious about. A lot of authors that predicted anything like a smartphone/pocket computer also predicted things like flying cars or teleporters.  Too bad the two don't correlate better in real life!

Which sort of brings me back to the original topic - at this point I'm sure I have more pounds and square feet of books in my house than I do sewing machines.  I think books are easier to find homes for, though.  Although maybe not with the new generation...my niece and nephew still read almost everything in paper form, but my whole family is very bookish so I wouldn't be surprised if they were not the norm for their generation.

I do plan on moving out of state at some point (I can't afford to retire in CA!) - I am thinking about that NOW and trying to motivate myself to get rid of stuff.  I have a lot of 'dead people stuff' too, that's the hardest (for me) to let go of.  I'm not sure why I feel so obligated to save this stuff, or who I think I'm saving it for, but I feel horribly guilty if I get rid of any little bit of it. I need to find some other sucker in the family to offload it onto!  LOL

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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sewnoma
I do plan on moving out of state at some point (I can't afford to retire in CA!) - I am thinking about that NOW and trying to motivate myself to get rid of stuff.  I have a lot of 'dead people stuff' too, that's the hardest (for me) to let go of.  I'm not sure why I feel so obligated to save this stuff, or who I think I'm saving it for, but I feel horribly guilty if I get rid of any little bit of it. I need to find some other sucker in the family to offload it onto!  LOL


I'm outta here in the second half of next month. Wife protested my taking my SM collection - but even though its going with me, the amount of "junk" we've accumulated is astounding. Thank Goddess the guy who is buying my Ca house wants some of the furniture and "other stuff"! At least I don't have to get rid of it...

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Saxonbowman

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Reply with quote  #11 
I work in a library and occasionally have to help unload donated books that come in by the trunkload. Many of these come from retirement homes or people moving into them. What's funny is when the person unloading them gets second thoughts and ends up keeping many of the ones they came to donate.
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Sewnoma

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Reply with quote  #12 
My uncle recently passed away, and he was a bona fide hermit, a bookhound and a bachelor his entire life.  I don't know how many books he had but they hauled off four dumpsters full of PHOTOCOPIED books alone.  Most of his actual bound books were distributed among about 5 local bookstores but my cousin took a whole trailer load of boxes of sci fi from the house, knowing that's a favorite genre for most of our family.

So now my cousin basically has a free sci fi bookstore in his garage - I really need to get over there and haul off a couple boxes for myself. [smile]  My 15 year old nephew found my uncle's old ratty set of Tarzan books by Edgar Rice Burroughs and has been devouring those...those were my uncles FAVORITE books and my nephew even looks a bit like my uncle so it's heartwarming, somehow, to see him curled up on a chair and engrossed in those same old adventures that countless boys have read through.  [smile]  

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sewnoma
... My 15 year old nephew found my uncle's old ratty set of Tarzan books by Edgar Rice Burroughs and has been devouring those...those were my uncles FAVORITE books and my nephew even looks a bit like my uncle so it's heartwarming, somehow, to see him curled up on a chair and engrossed in those same old adventures that countless boys have read through.  [smile]  


THESE are the moments we live for.....  thanks for sharing!

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chris

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Reply with quote  #14 
I have begun the downsizing process. Egads!!! Thankfully, I know someone connected to a quilting group that makes quilts and Christmas bags for a localish homeless shelter. The group has accepted close to 12 sewing machines from me ~ some just heads and some complete with cabinets. I have more to donate but I need to dig deeper in the craft (aka crap) room and haul them out. Donated yards of fabric and miles of thread to them also. I'm trying to be ruthless but it is difficult.

Where my difficulty lies is what to do with all the linens I've also collected and the embroidered bits and bobs not to mention the older quilts and quilt tops. Currently hanging onto the quilts and quilt tops but will downsize them eventually. 

About the machines ~ only 1 ungrateful recipient. She wanted a featherweight and called me to let me know that. I was polite but firm when I told her I'd sell mine before donating it. The nerve of some people. I've been assured she has a good heart.

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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #15 
Chris, you have been more than generous in your donating.  To think someone had the nerve to complain they weren't given a Featherweight!  Some people, huh?  I don't even want to think about how to deal with my small collection as my daughter has no room in her apt. and no time for sewing.  But, at her age, I didn't either.  Maybe the bug will bite her later in life too!
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Mavis
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ChattyKathy

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Reply with quote  #16 
None of my 3 adult daughters and DIL are interested in my vintage SMs. I bought a new Viking for the oldest a few years ago. So far she has only used it for a few hemming jobs. None seem to excited about vintage sewing machines. All are to busy with their careers and family to want to sew. I hope maybe they might learn to appreciate my vintage SMS in the future...maybe I am expecting too much.

I hope I don't not have to worry about this a good many years!

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Kathy
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macybaby

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Reply with quote  #17 
well,  it never hurts to ask - unless the person you ask gets really offended.  I've learned "after the fact" of machines getting tossed because no one asked about them.  And some of that was family members.  At least now they all know to ask me before tossing a sewing machine or sewing related items.

Chris - as to the embroidered bits and bobs,  have you seen some of the artwork that is done using them?  it does require cutting them up,  but some of it is amazing and I've started saving up bits of embroidery to use some day.    I have the site bookmarked at home,  but can't find it online right now.


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chris

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Reply with quote  #18 
Mavis, thank you for the understanding about the situation re the Featherweight.

Cathy; I would love to see the artwork with the bits and bobs. I'm interested in doing something with them besides them taking up real estate space in the craft room. 
Just found 3 different sets of days of the week tea? towels ~ the embroidered kind. All seem to be missing a day. 

Have decided I'm on a buying moratorium from all stuff minus food for us and the furbabies. 

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PatriciaPf

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Reply with quote  #19 
I think that's very wise of you, Chris.  Having just nearly emptied my entire household and put it into a warehouse, I am mortified by the humongous amount of stuff we accumulated. What's worse is that I had no time to sort it, and I have only a vague idea of what's in boxes, so I will have a great time relearning some old camping skills.  Don't let yourselves create this kind of nightmare.
In the meantime, please pray for us.  We really need help.

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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #20 
Patty, we have really cheap housing here if you don't mind living in the hood...
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Sewnoma

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Reply with quote  #21 
Some happy news - I have a brand new nephew!  I don't have many details and I'm not allowed to share his name or photo online (his parents have requested the family not put their kid's info on public social media, which I think is a good policy), but I AM allowed to say he's a healthy boy and was born at 1:30 this morning, and the new mother is doing well and getting some rest after a quite long labor.  First child for their family, and is my mother-in-law & father-in-law's first grandchild, so there is a LOT of excitement in my husband's family today!  [smile]

I guess I really need to get working on that baby quilt!  LOL  (I have all the fabric and drew up a pattern...just need to get sewing!)

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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #22 
Congratulations, Sewnoma! New babies are such fun, as long as they belong to someone else! (Ooh, cynical grandma voice sneaking in). I'm sure they will love the quilt you make for him no matter when they get it. Glad mama and baby are doing well 😊
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Margaret 
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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #23 
Sewnoma, Congratulations on your new nephew!  I remember well how excited we all were when my youngest sister adopted her two children (both as infants).  It was really a couple of joyous occasions -- she and her husband had gone through the entire fertility process -- including having invitro implants 2 or 3 times.  The last time, she tested positive for pregnancy for 2-3 weeks, but then she lost the implant and that was very tough for both of them!  But the two babies they adopted, one is 31 years old (? - I think) and the youngest is like 27(?)  My memory is really going south! 

Margaret is right -- they will love whatever baby quilt you make! 

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Jeanette Frantz, Ocala, Florida
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