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ke6cvh

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Hello,

  I have a new source of training from a gent I found that is a Wheeler and Wilson enthusiast.  Not sure if he belongs to this group but if so....thanks Mike!  He has been schooling me about the old sperm oils that were used in the 1800's.  They were used in transmissions until banned by congress in 1972.   I'm buying some more 1800's machines but these are industrials (my favorite 😉  Was told that I might see some yellowish plasticize coating and that would be old sperm oil...not to remove it.  Started to search what might be a good sub.  Jojoba oil can be mighty close in some respects and can be had by the gallon.  Not a complete substitution but I read does not gum up, does not attract dust as a result, is mostly waxes by content so will have good rust resistant properties and not run off too easily.  Lot's of posts on the internet from users and makers of hand planes on using exactly this stuff and it's natural not highly carcinogenic.  Then I ran across this power point on watch/clock oils and the different places to use different products.  The old Nye has gone from stuff made from creatures of the sea to synthetic but I see it is expensive on one site but reasonable on the other (auction) site we all know about.  So, I can buy the jojoba by the gallon and the Nye by the pint....sounds like a winner for special apps like open action machines like the ones from the 1800's I'm getting currently and some of my Union Specials.  Of course dust is the real enemy so need to make some more covers from umbrella repair material I can get by the yard for $1.10 USD in town.  Here is the link about the different oils tested and used by the experts in the different watch movements.  I like this because we are talking people interested in movements that do not deteriorate for years.  I downloaded it but it is also viewable from the link below Best regards, Mike Kendall http://www.kensclockclinic.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Clock-Oils.pdf
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Mickey

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Posts: 458
Reply with quote  #2 
Don't bother fuzzing too much. Jojoba oil is technically a much more stable wax than other vegetable oils, but a good sewing machine oil still gives less stickiness in the long run. I don't doubt sperm oil was exceptional, but you can hardly get an empty bottle of the stuff these days. Any remains of varnished oil will eventually dissolve and flush out from gears and joints what ever you use.

I have to admit I fuzz a bit with oil, and you can find that extra smooth oil if you take the bother. For sewing machine purposes the advantage seems to come with just right viscosity and coating properties. Some oils are tested to lessen friction more than others. I swear Finish Line Ceramic Wet lube (for bike chains) is a notch nicer than most oils. Sewing machines oils are quite light, but still varies a bit, I'm guessing from SAE 5 to 15 depending on the source, average being SAE10. Some bottles I've had have been like water, others a bit more amber colored and thicker. Some new synthetic oils have that extra smooth feel, the less additives the better. The Advantage of the super refined lubricant for watches is it dries up leaving hardly no trace, but much the same for any of the best oils. I think some have teflon or PFTE added. I have used those Superlube pens, it's a nice oil, but I ended up with other favorites for sewing machines.

For practical puroses you just have to try, you might find something worth noticing. The standard for sewing machines seems to be the basic mineral oil (aka sewing machine oil) and Triflow. I have a personal favorite in Finish Line Ceramic Wet lube, I have noticed it gives an extra smoothness on my cast irion models. I haven't tried all oil by far, so I guess there are stuff to be found. Sewing machines are much heavier machinery than a wrist watch, and I think and ideal oil for the purpose would differ slightly. For larger clock works I'm not sure.
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