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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #1 
There's at least one cylinder player in the Seattle Craigs List but it's not a screaming deal.  Looks like someone up there is parting with at least a few pieces from their collection.
Actually shows as Bellingham area and this one of the seller's less expensive machines.
https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/atq/d/bellingham-edison-maroon-gem-phonograph/6870204069.html
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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #2 
That was probably me relating the story of the pair of $60 table top Victrolas that I stupidly let get away ca 1983 or so. They had BEAUTIFUL MOP inlay in their horns, one was blue, the other red. Even then I could have resold one of them for enough to pay for them both. Been kicking my self over this ever since - where the HELL was my head?
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodney
OFF TOPIC: Does anyone here collect Victrolas too? I thought I remembered seeing someone who did here.
https://portland.craigslist.org/wsc/atq/d/cornelius-victrola-with-78-rpm-records/6870193837.html
Looks pretty complete and seems to be a great price at $40.
vic 1.jpg  vic2.jpg 


That's a graphonola not a victrola. It looks like most I've seen, the bottom record storage is gone(if there ever was one). The one I sold out of my Aunts house was beautiful, all intact, and works. I recently came across more needles for it if anybody wants them.

Cari

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Treadle&Gears

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cari-in-Oly

That's a graphonola not a victrola. It looks like most I've seen, the bottom record storage is gone(if there ever was one). The one I sold out of my Aunts house was beautiful, all intact, and works. I recently came across more needles for it if anybody wants them.

Cari


OOOH!!!!!! 

What needles do you have?  I have 1923 Victor VV-215.
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #5 
I have a collection of cylinder and 78 players. I got into those before I started collecting and restoring sewing machines. I still enjoy my phonographs. 

While surfing Shopgoodwill, and back in the days when local pickup was still available in Tacoma, I got my last phono acquisition - a c.1920s Sears Roebuck Silvertone table top cabinet phonograph. It will play both the Victor (side to side needle cut records) and Pathe and others like Empire, etc. (vertical "hill and dale" cut) records. I had to make the repro crank handle. The cabinet still needs some wood work and the cloth grill needs to be replaced, but I shelved the project to work on sewing machines. Besides - I really don't have room for it. I just had to have it because it was cheap and I knew I could restore it. What I love about it is it sound decent (although not as nice as my Victors) it has a wood horn - not cast iron- so is actually portable. My table top Victor weighs almost as much as my floor model! 

I 2. Silvertone phonograph oblique.jpg  make my own triangular bamboo fiber needles for my 78 players. Those are expensive when you buy them online. 

The photo shows it with most of the work done except the outside woodwork and grill cloth restored. Inside is done. 

- Bruce, 
Bremerton, WA

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hilltophomesteader

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Reply with quote  #6 
Bruce, let me know if you want any records for your 78 players.....We've got about 4 or 5 milk crates full of 'em that we don't know what to do with...and hate to just destroy them.  And, we're in Port Orchard area often.
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #7 
I would like to get back into the phonograph scene again. I haven't picked up any records in years. Too many sewing machine finds! So many that I need to downsize now. I checked out your website - you must like hand cranks as much as I do! I don't have as many as you do, but in a small house in Bremerton, that's still sizable, especially when mixed with all my other collections - sewing machines, phonographs and old typewriters, not to mention all the old Living History stuff and cameras. Too many interests, not enough years or space. Thanks for the offer. I wish I could, but can't at present. Not at least until we get our pricey roof paid off (another year). 

-Bruce, 
Bremerton, WA
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Mrs. D

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Reply with quote  #8 
I'll have to take some photographs of our 1916 Silvertone (hand crank) phonograph I purchased for $400 (10 years ago when antiques were still fetching bigger prices $$$). 

It has its own special spot in the living room, sitting below Jon's Great Grandpa's World War I photo in his uniform.  When we have our annual open house I play the phonograph quite a bit. 

I'm still able to find/buy record album books containing six to eight 78 rpm records by an artist.  Records are easy to acquire for $1 each.  My favorite song I play for guests is, "Happy Days Are Here Again."  By Ben Selvin and the Crooners, 1930.   I would love to find a 78 of, "Ain't Misbehavin", introduced by Leon Reisman and his Orchestra July, 1929 New York City.  But I would take a later version by Fats Waller too, if I could find one. 

I have a 1929 Pal portable phonograph No. 509 (hand crank) in its square suitcase, made by PLAZA, New York City.  A little antiques store in Cuba City, IL.  Paid $55.

Pal phonograph 1929.jpg 




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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #9 
That suitcase phonograph is like the first phono I ever restored. One of the governor weights was missing. I had to make that plus replace the springs - again home made from a roll of flat spring stock. It was a fun project and plays well, but these were rarely well made machines in the common category, but some really fine ones were produced for those who could afford them. It's amazing how many of these wound up at Goodwill or other places like that when they are mostly as easy to fix as old sewing machines that wind up there. 

Old phonographs are good as an accessory to old sewing machines too. After all - aside from the radio, which came later, I would bet there were a lot of people who listened to records while sewing. Of course, unless they had someone to change the record for them, they would only be sitting at the sewing machine for two minutes to four minutes tops until they had to change it. Along with zigzag sewing machines, the 50s also saw the introduction of the long playing 33-1/3 record. They even added stereo by the 60s! There are still those of us old enough to remember the old days right down to the grainy, streaky black and white TV with "rabbit ears" antenna. 

My oldest phonograph is a model 1897 Columbia "Eagle" that plays wax 2 minute cylinders (and later celluloid ones). It was called the Eagle because it cost 20 dollars - an American 20 dollar gold coin was called an Eagle because of the eagle on the back side. 

- Bruce,
Bremerton, WA


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Mrs. D

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Reply with quote  #10 
More Phonograph Stories:

The expression, "put a sock in it", was a request to quiet down. . . . according to a tour guide at the Hearthstone House in Appleton, Wisconsin. 

The tour guide said there was no volume control on the old phonograph, but putting a rolled up sock into the horn (as she demonstrated), immediately reduced the sound.  We laughed; what an entertaining story. 

I'd heard the expression "put a sock in it", but this was the first time someone suggested where the expression may have come from. 

Hearthstone was a private home, and it was the first home with Edison electric lighting, (September 30, 1882 - the night the lights went on).

https://www.hearthstonemuseum.org/



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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #11 
Put a sock init - 

Funny you should mention that - That story is true. In the old days of the phonographs having the metal horn sticking out of the machine, one way to mute the volume was by putting a rolled up sock in the horn. It does make an effective mute. These old phonographs were totally acoustic machines. The smallest, cheapest machines had a small horn, usually nothing but a simple cone (like the Edison Gem, although a larger horn "kit" was available for an extra charge) which didn't sound good, also giving us another example of a "tin horn" sounding off. The larger the horn (especially the better designed ones), the greater the sound. Generally, they went from the Edison Gem and Columbia Graphophone cone horns, to the small, properly proportioned acoustic horns like on the Columbia Eagle, then to the "Witch's Hat" horns - so named due to their shape and the fact that the body was painted black - to the larger, straight parlor or full size horns to the even more elegant swan or tuba shaped Cygnet horns. 

When I was in the Navy, we learned how to roll and store our socks according to the Bluejacket's Manual, something I do today. When I demonstrate my old cylinder phonographs with their acoustic horns I always show them the "put a sock in it" routine of using one for a mute. All that went "the way of the West" (or "went South") when the table top disc players came out with their built-in metal or wood horns like we see in the table top and suitcase models. One feature on some of these for volume control is a sliding plate that cuts the air flow in the horn to reduce volume or a series of slats or folding doors to reduce volume such as on the Columbia portables and Victor table and floor model phonographs. 

"And now you know.....The Rest Of The Story." - Paul Harvey

Bruce, 
Bremerton, WA 

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wahoonc

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Reply with quote  #12 
I am going to start a new topic on the Victrolas and then attempt to move the posts from the HEY! check this out thread. I think they deserve their own area.

We have two Victor Talking Machines, both are in excellent condition and fully functional.

They are a 1915 VV-XIV model the other is a 1920 model VV-100
 
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #13 
Thank you Aaron for moving this to its own thread.  

Janey

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Treadle&Gears

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Reply with quote  #14 
low-res victrola.jpg

Everyone has such nice players!  This is the VV-215 (bad old phone pic).  It came full of 78s and had another plastic tub of them as well.  I really enjoy using it.

K

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #15 
Years ago, my wife's grandfather brought us his 1915 oak Victor Victrola XI along with all the 78 rpm records. It needed a bit of restoration, which we did, and it sits in our living room with all the additional bells and whistles we got for it over the years such as a conversion unit that lets us play hill and dale recordings like Pathe and Empire records. Wanting something more portable, I got a VV-IX, c. 1914 in mahogany. I swear it's almost as heavy as the floor model, but sure sounds nice. I rebuilt the reproducers, so they are like new. Since then I picked up some cylinder players - Edison and Columbia, but the Victors are still the best. I have a small collection of portable players too. I'll take a few photos in a day or so. 

-Bruce, 
Bremerton, WA
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Mrs. D

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Reply with quote  #16 
1Silvertone 1916 .jpg 
Here's my Silvertone phonograph.  Can you tell me what year it was manufactured? 

I was told 1916, but this morning I found a clue that tells me that information is wrong.   Look at the patent info on the phonograph arm.  June 17, 1919.  

6 Silvertone 1916.jpg 
When we have the big VSF Wisconsin-Illinois Gathering June 15, 2019, we'll have to stop our sewing machine extravaganza event and go into the house and have a dance or two with the old phonograph.  


2 Silvertone 1916.jpg 
I see it is time for me to get out the Howard's furniture oil and give the case a big drink.
3 Silvertone 1916.jpg 
Today while photographing the Silvertone, I danced to the tune of "Shine On Harvest Moon."  I think my ghosties were impressed.  Although my dog Buddy looked puzzled while I danced and swayed to the song.  
4 Silvertone 1916.jpg
Another question . . . that little gray "s" pipe in the corner . . . is that a fixture to install a horn?  What is it?

  5 Silvertone 1916.jpg 
Handle turns so smooth.  I see there is also a little knob that pulls in and out . . . it doesn't seem to change the volume, but when pulled, it kind of diminishes the stereo-ness of the sound.
6 Silvertone 1916.jpg 

Grandpa Bill, WWI.jpg 
Jon's Great Grandpa Bill's photo in WWI uniform.  Sorry about all the reflections of the room.  It is difficult with convex glass to photograph it.

Throughout the house we have antique family portraits.  Our family, and the two other families (members) The Wrolstads and The Quiens who used to live in our house.  Definitely, we share our house with "others".  Check out "One Haunted House, Batteries Not Included" to read about our ghosties.

http://www.oldhouseweb.com/blog/one-haunted-house-batteries-not-included/


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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #17 
Another little cylinder player.
https://seattle.craigslist.org/sno/atq/d/mount-vernon-the-gem-thomas-edison-1899/6873255531.html
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #18 
Nice! (not while I am in escrow, not while I am in escrow...)
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #19 
That Edison GEM on Craigslist does not have the proper horn. Here is one of the two Edison GEM phonographs my wife and I have. This one has the 2/4 minute gearing kit that was a later optional accessory for playing 4 minute cylinders. You can see in the photos there is a 4 minute H reproducer in the player instead of the 2 minute C reproducer. The gears fold down for 4 minute gearing, then fold back and the knob is pulled to bring the center gear out to change it to the original 2 minute gearing. The original gear cover is off - it has to be removed for the speed change kit. The original type cone horn (reproduction) is shown. In the last photo, you can see a tubular socket on the front left of the machine. This is for the optional horn support for the larger 8-sided parlor horn (not shown, but we have one [a reproduction]). 

This is a GEM model B, 1905-1908, which has a permanently attached hand crank. A slot is cut in the right side of the case to slip over the crank shaft. 
1. Edison GEM case, cone horn and 2M cylinder.jpg  2. Edison GEM with cone horn and 2M cylinder.jpg  3. Edison GEM with cone horn, 2M cylinder - crank end.jpg  4. Edison GEM showing 2 & 4 minute gearing kit.jpg  5. Edison GEM showing front logo and socket for larger horn support.jpg 
- Bruce, 
Bremerton, WA

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hilltophomesteader

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Reply with quote  #20 
OH MY GOSH!  That GEM is so absolutely screaming adorable I want it RIGHT NOW!  I love it!  (I do not need to start another collection.  I do not need to start another collection...)
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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #21 
Victor Shipping Crate $150.  I thought it was neat anyway.
https://seattle.craigslist.org/est/atq/d/snoqualmie-antique-victor-victrola/6903895374.html
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