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Pabry

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Reply with quote  #1 
Has anyone use or seen this foot before?

From the front, it looks like there’s a groove/tunnel that could be used for underbraiding, but turn it upside down, there’s a piece of metal that would block any ribbon/yarn right before the needle. The foot’s “toes” point high up from the bed, making me think it’s to accommodate thick material?

I don’t recall where I acquired this so I’m no help there. It’s been sitting in my stash and I saw it when I’m reorganizing.

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #2 
I think it is a bow cording foot.  I think it puts the cording into a seam - like piping, sort of.  I've seen similar that have a longer "bow" or a shorter "bow," but don't remember for which machines,

Janey

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Pabry

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Janey. It’s just odd that the bottom has a piece of metal that sits in the “tunnel”. The piece of metal (the foot installed) sits flush with machine bed. I’ve tried pass yarn through the tunnel, and it doesn’t seem to work bc of that. I’ll google cording foot to see what I can find.
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #4 
Good luck.  I know I looked and most of what I saw were the single toe feet.  The Singer "Corder (bow)" feet are a little different, as is the Wheeler & Wilson #8 foot.   Some Singer numbers that I have come up with are 26399, 35113, 85870 and then the tubular trimming attachment is 35984.  I emailed Dorothy from Colorado group, who is familiar with industrial machines to see if she has any ideas or at least give us some more search terms.

When you tried yarn, were you able to get it through the tunnel?  I can't tell from the pictures, but I'm thinking that if you find the right size cording that fits and use it much like a braider with fabric between the foot and feed dogs, that it will catch just the edge of the cording and stitch the cording on to the top of the fabric.

I searched for some early patents and nothing 'jumped out' at me.

Janey

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Ericka

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Reply with quote  #5 
It's a hemstitcher.  You normally find them for top-clamping machines.  I've only seen a few that were side-clampers.

Ericka
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Ericka

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Reply with quote  #6 
Here's a picture of the attachment in a White manual.
Ericka
White Manual_0013 Opt.jpg 

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #7 

Thank you, Erika.  I was hoping you would see this.  I should have waited or looked closer at my computer.  I have a picture of a White hemstitcher from about seven years, in my "Feet & Fashion Aids" folder.

I couldn't find a patent in my "Patents" folder for a hemstitcher, or hemstitch attachment, like this one.

Janey


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Pabry

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thank you to you both. Haven’t seen anything like this foot before. Ericka, thank you for the picture and instructions.
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Ericka

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Reply with quote  #9 
I wasn't able to find a patent for a hemstitcher like it, either.  The closest I got was this one, which was eventually assigned to Wheeler Wilson.
http://www.freepatentsonline.com/0778367.pdf

But I have another variation of that foot that is also a White and has 3 different patent dates stamped on it.  But, to find the right patent, there are several hundred un-named and un-assigned patents that have to be looked at one-by-one, unless anyone knows of a better way to search than just date.  Here's the patent info:
Larkins Pat.
July 16, 1878
Oct 15, 1878
and
White S.M.Co.
Patent
July 18, 1882

Maybe one day we'll have time to go through them all....
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ericka
I wasn't able to find a patent for a hemstitcher like it, either.  The closest I got was this one, which was eventually assigned to Wheeler Wilson.
http://www.freepatentsonline.com/0778367.pdf


That looks like the Singer imitation hemstitcher, except for how it attaches.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ericka
.... better way to search than just date.  Here's the patent info:
Larkins Pat.
July 16, 1878
Oct 15, 1878
and
White S.M.Co.
Patent
July 18, 1882


I used Google - patent "July 16, 1878" sewing
Sometimes I get lucky.  One still has to search quite a bit, but better than going one by one (which I have done).  Frequently the results will have "Official Gazette of the United States" and that is kind of a hit or miss.  However, that is where I found Lakin patents 205966 & 208911  I have an old bookmark that I just change the patent number to find a jpg of the first page.  Then I have a link to a pdf that I just change the patent number to download the pdf.

The following  that I found for hemstitch or presser foot patents with the dates.  I don't think any of them look like said foot.

http://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/pdfs/US205966.pdf
http://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/pdfs/US208911.pdf
http://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/pdfs/US261421.pdf

Janey

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Ericka

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Reply with quote  #11 
I managed to find the patent from 1882 that was stamped White S.M.Co, but its inventor was G. W. Baker.  Looks just like my hemstitcher, though, so must've been assigned to White at some point.  Here it is:
http://www.freepatentsonline.com/0261420.pdf

I found that it seems that most of the sewing machine and attachment patents have a "Current US Classification of 112", and that is entered into the patent info that's scanned into the database.  But, when I tried putting that classification in for the other dates, I came up with the other "Lakin" patents that you came up with.  I have no idea why my attachment would have "Larkin" stamped on it and what looks like the only applicable patents were invented by "Lakin".  But here's a pic of the attachment I have with the stamps for reference:
Ericka
20200712_134341[1].jpg  20200712_134615[1].jpg  20200712_134629[1].jpg 

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #12 
Thank you.  I wish some of the old patents had the "cited by" additions.  I only found one of the Lakin patents in the Smithsonian pdf.  There were several for George W. Baker, but not either 261420 or 261421.  Oh well, at least you found the right one.

Janey

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Pabry

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Reply with quote  #13 
Wow. Thanks for the photos of those hemmers Ericka. I love using these old all metal feet. Looking forward to trying it in a project.
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #14 
I was just perusing the parts list for 24 machines that Erika posted https://web.archive.org/web/20060314115336/http://parts.singerco.com/IPpartCharts/24-1_2_20_24_30_50_51.pdf  and found a low shank one - #28839 - on page 48 of that pdf.  It does say that it was obsolete and to use 35024.  The one that they said to use is more like what I call "imitation hemstitcher."  Also that it was for the home machines 24-24 and 24-30.  Based on what I know about chain stitchers and hemstitchers, I'm wondering how those would work together.

Janey

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Ericka

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Reply with quote  #15 
Yeah, I saw those pics of the different hemstitchers and the completely different attachment systems.  Unfortunately, I am absolutely no expert at all on the 24 machines.  I can see that there were various ones that were made and can only assume that different sub-classes used different attachment systems.  That parts chart you're referring to was for about 7 different sub-classes and I can see another 8 different sub-classes from other Model 24 parts lists that I downloaded.  And I might not have downloaded all that were there, either 😉 

Hmmm, chain stitchers and hemstitchers together.  Hadn't thought about that, either.  I'm REALLY not an expert on hemstitching.  I mean, I know the attachments really well, but the decorative sewing part of it...well, I guess I just don't get it.  Then again, I was always a tomboy and hated frilly things growing up and when I started to sew.  So, sorry, not much help on this one.

Ericka
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HopeInMyHeart

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Reply with quote  #16 
I also own this attachment. In the "List of Parts - Singer Machines Nos. 31-15 and 31-50" Form 8939 Revised (442), on pages 34, and again on page 60, it is listed as a "Hemstitcher" with no additional notation. Though I can't currently quote the source, I believe I saw it in other, earlier documentation proving this may have been the first, low shank, imitation hemstitcher Singer sold (the second #28915 and the third #120687). I think it was made for the "Tailor's Machine" Model 15-30. Acquiring this one was a happy discovery. It was mixed with extra attachments in a Singer Style 11 Box, possibly Box #26316 designed for the 15-30.

SINGER - Hemstitcher -28671.jpg


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Pabry

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Reply with quote  #17 
Let me start off by saying I’m pleasantly astounded by the depth of knowledge on this forum. I needed help with identifying this odd attachment, and now I also have the part number. I’m flabbergasted. Woohoo!

Thank you Rebecca for the detailed reply and the picture. I of course went to download a copy of the 31-15 parts list, so I have a copy in my files now. My hemstitcher was floating around in a drawer. I’d forgotten how I’d acquired it. Your comment about it coming with your Single style box made me think about the puzzle box I’d purchased a while ago. I went searching through my pictures archives and sure enough! That was it. Right there in the picture in the lower left hand corner. That’s how my hemstitcher came to me too. As an extra in a Singer Style Box (though I have no idea what style # my box is).

Mystery solved!!

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