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pslaght

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Reply with quote  #1 
We found a Minnesota A (New Model A) treadle sewing machine in the basement of the house we rent.  We cleaned it up and oiled it.  The only thing broken on the machine is the belt (I will have one tomorrow).  The cabinet is another story.  We should be able to take it apart and stain it however, finding the drawers might prove difficult. I am just trying to get an approximate date that it was made.  I know that Sears sold it and it is a knock off of a Singer machine possibly made by Domestic.  Thanks for any help.

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johnstuart

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Reply with quote  #2 
Wow domestic built machines are popping up all over. I just got a post 1885 Domestic reliant B (fully seized) I don't know a thing about these machines. If i ever see a list of dates, i will post them. I think Katie Farmer might have some of the dates. My front bobbin slide plate is missing , so i don't thing i will be able to ever date my machine.

  John Stuart
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pslaght

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi John,

My research has shown that Sears used a number of different manufacturers for the Minnesota line. The Minnesota A is, I believe, supposed to be a knockoff of the Singer 127. I am stuck trying to find a date of manufacture though.
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pslaght

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Reply with quote  #4 
John, we found out that the machine was made in approximately 1917. Now I need to find out what kind of wood they used so we can get it sanded and stained.
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pslaght

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Reply with quote  #5 
I think i read somewhere that the wood is oak. A lot of the veneer is water worn and peeling. I am thinking wood glue, wood filler and stain.
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johnstuart

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Reply with quote  #6 
If there is veneer that is lifting in a bubble, there are glue injection things made by 3M. You inject the glue from the syringe and then you clamp the bubbled veneer flat. Water does this often and a lot of people remove the veneer and replace unnecessarily. Water damage does that a lot.

  John Stuart
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pslaght

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Reply with quote  #7 
Here is a picture of the wood after a rough sanding.  Trying to find out what kind of wood it is so that we can buy the appropriate stain.

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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #8 
Sanding and staining the cabinet may very well destroy any antique value the cabinet may have.  The wood is oak, I think called "tiger oak" because of the wood grain --although I grant you I'm no expert.  There are many good tutorials and informative instructions provided by forum members who have a great deal of experience, not only with the sewing machines themselves, but also with the woodworking, preserving the antique patina, etc.  If you review the Victorian Sweatshop category, you will find these items and these tutorials/instructions have helped a whole lot of the members of the forum.  The methods written about are tried and true methods.  Give them your consideration.  Of course, if the wood is just completely destroyed by deep scratches, missing veneer, etc., then you would need to look a little more --there have been those who had pieces of veneer that were coming unattached and needed repair.  SteveH is a good person to provide advice, so is Skipper (Skipper  worked in restoration of antique cabinets, etcd., sl he is well qualified to instruct on how you should handle the wooden cabinets.. If you want to keep the antiquity value, check out these tutorials before you do something you may regret,
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Jeanette Frantz, Ocala, Florida
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pslaght

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Reply with quote  #9 
Jeannette,

Thank you for your reply. We aren't really trying to sell it or anything. I would like to get it back to its former glory. A lot of the veneer is peeling and broken. They stored it in a wet srea and used the machine as a paint table. There are a lot of water stains, oil stains, and paint all over the top. We got the machine running, it was siezed up. Only replacement necessary was a new belt.
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johnstuart

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Reply with quote  #10 
That does look like "tiger oak" or otherwise known as quarter cut oak.

  John Stuart
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pslaght

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Reply with quote  #11 
Thank you. The wood is in pretty bad shape. Not really trying to keep the machine vintage, more trying to fix the wood and get it as close to original as possible. Veneer is missing in places. Water stained, oil stained, and they used it as a painting table so there's a lot of old paint on it. Back wall is warped enough that the drawers on the right side are separated from the wall. The machine itself is in perfect running condition, just had to clean some parts, oil it, and replace the belt.
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #12 
Keep in mind that veneer is very thin, and it doesn't take much to sand right through it.
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Lori in Wisconsin
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