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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #1 
As I'm consolidating my tools for sewing I see some gaps in my tools and on my list to someday acquire was a vertical bobbin zigzag, a vintage decorative stitch machine with reverse function cams, high shank (for being able to use industrial feet) and a small foot print treadle cabinet.  Last weekend I came across a Necchi Supernova BU in a Gebowin parlor treadle cabinet - and with a complete accessory kit.  This pretty much covers what was on my list in one machine!

The machine was a dirty mess but turned freely and no rust. The cabinet is solid - the irons are all good - but it will need some refinishing.  The cams and feet are all there but the manual is in Dutch..  It came from a guy who does clean-up work for bank repos and this was a situation where there was an unattended death.  So for $50 I took the chance I could get this up and running - although I know the risks of the many intricate parts being stuck.

Before any work I tested and it sewed and zigzagged and did decorative stitches - but of course it was dirty and gummy with old oil so ran a bit hard.  After as much clean up I could do without disassembling major areas, it ran really smooth - the treadle works great and I thought I was good to go.  Next day the cam shaft started intermittently stopping and then stopped all together.  I tried oil and heat and more cleaning and then decided I needed to do a more thorough cleaning and disassembly to get to the harder to reach components of the camshaft.

See photos.  The first is the top of the machine with the cover off.  I removed the metal plate (very easy - just 4 screws) that the camshaft is attache to.  It came off easy.  The underside and inside of the machine showed more gunk.  I then had better access to the internals for clean up.  I soaked the camshaft plate in alcohol and then cleaned well everything I could get to with a fine brush and clean alcohol.  I then re-oiled using Triflow.

I put the plate back on and presto- now everything works perfectly and much more smoothly.  So far, I'm very happy with this machine - it runs so smooth and the feeds are so precise - nice straight stitch and zigzag.  The feeds drop conveniently, there seems to be good piercing power and control.  I don't have a motor in the machine - the cords were cut.  The downsides are - buttonholes  are not ideal and the utility stitches are not that great.  No nice overcast function other than zigzag and the twin needle capability is front and back not side by side - so no ability to mimic a coverstitch machine. I plan to use this machine for the decorative stitching and free motion work that requires a zigzag.  But the straight stitch is so nice I could use this for general garment sewing work as well.  And it's really fun to have a treadle and experience treadle sewing.

Now my list has just one more item.  Soon I have to decide now what machines duplicate my functions for garment sewing and what ones I will rehome.

SN camstack top.jpg  SN camstack bottom.jpg  SN parlor cabinet.jpg  SN sewing machine.jpg  SN decorative stitches.jpg 





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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #2 
Chaly. Wow did you get lucky! The embroidery units are the only weakness on the Supernovas and yours was working. That's fantastic. The boxed cam sets for those machines are often more expensive than what you paid for everything. Looks like you're missing both the light and hi-low switches on the far right of the deck. Chances are... if the motor had been removed... that perhaps the old Necchi resistor for the hi-low may have gone bad. No one makes a new one. It isn't really 'needed' and the machine can be saved to just go one speed. I can't really tell from the pics. Sometimes the plastic switches break off and everything is fine underneath.. . I 'may' have all those parts, I'll have to check: have a twin to your machine with a seriously 'iffy' embroidery unit gear and I've been going back and forth for a year wondering if I should part it out or save it. The only thing I really need is the needle position lock spring (have another Super with a crazy weak spring). The only reason I've been putting off the fix is that it's going to take hours....

That is, of course, if you ever wanted to go back to electric. =)

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #3 
what exactly is this high/low resistor?  Wire wound, carbon, etc?  Resistors are resistors and can be had for certain. basically you need the power dissipation and type.  Likely it is a wire wound resistor is my guess and those are common as dirt.  Best regards, Mike
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #4 
There is a two position switch on the base for the speed of the machine. Apparently it is not a resistor but a transformer. When it goes all you can do is try to track down another one.

Screen Shot 2019-09-11 at 2.11.48 PM.png 


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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim/Steelsewing
Looks like you're missing both the light and hi-low switches on the far right of the deck. Chances are... if the motor had been removed... that perhaps the old Necchi resistor for the hi-low may have gone bad. No one makes a new one. It isn't really 'needed' and the machine can be saved to just go one speed. I can't really tell from the pics. Sometimes the plastic switches break off and everything is fine underneath.. . I 'may' have all those parts, I'll have to check: have a twin to your machine with a seriously 'iffy' embroidery unit gear and I've been going back and forth for a year wondering if I should part it out or save it. The only thing I really need is the needle position lock spring (have another Super with a crazy weak spring). The only reason I've been putting off the fix is that it's going to take hours....

That is, of course, if you ever wanted to go back to electric. =)


Jim, anyone's guess as to why the motor was removed on my SN. I do have the original foot pedal though.  I would hope that you could get the part you need to get one of your Supernovas working - but if you do decide you will part them out please keep me in mind for the motor components.
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #6 
Oh I hate to say this... but I have working Supernovas. Yes, it's true. Probably too many, and I've been trying to figure out how to downsize now for a week. =)
This may be a welcome opportunity for both of us.

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #7 
So then it is almost certainly a step down transformer.  Back in the old days people would rewind transformers themselves.  I't not all that difficult.   There is a slew of information and videos on the internet about it.  Best regards, Mike
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim/Steelsewing
Oh I hate to say this... but I have working Supernovas. Yes, it's true. Probably too many, and I've been trying to figure out how to downsize now for a week. =)
This may be a welcome opportunity for both of us.


I'm pondering whether to put a lot of effort and expense into this machine.  It is working perfectly and I love some of the unique functionality that is not offered by my Singer slants but I'm concerned about the longevity with the plastic green worm type "gear".  It looks good presently although from what I have researched, this part can fail and it is very difficult to repair or get a replacement.

Since you have some Supernovas - what are your thoughts on this?   Is this part destined to eventually fail?
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #9 
It was 1961 when "Which?" magazine (the consumer reports of Great Britain) tested 40 sewing machines and could not come up with a clear winner. It was a tie between the Necchi Supernova and the Singer 201 (still, btw, being made in Scotland until 1963 even though production had ended in the U.S. in 1957). The staff at the magazine also attached the superlative: Sewing machine to last a lifetime.

I think many of us know that the PR department at Singer went wild with the win... and before you knew it the Singer 201 became heralded as the 'best Singer ever made' and, still to this day, it continues to receive accolades here in the States... even though the model of 201 that was tested by Which? was the exterior mounted motor 201k3 and the model of 201 everyone here is most familiar with is the potted motor version.  Be that as it may... the one thing we've forgotten is that the 201 tied with the Supernova.

At last count I have four Necchi supernovas. I can't help it, they follow me home. Of the four there's one Automatica that has a 'sticky' worm gear. I haven't yet taken the time and gone to every possible remedy to make this machine more reliable when it comes to the embroidery unit. It still sews straight and zig-zags just fine. Another of the Supernovas has a little issue with a weak spring on the zig-zag lever - I have 'fixed' it temporarily with the thoughtful addition of an extra spring where there shouldn't be one...lol... but I will fix it right.

Every single Necchi that comes home gets a complete going over when it comes to the wiring insulation because the older ones almost always have issues. And, I suppose that I should also mention that I have heard about Supernovas that were rewired because the transformer allowing the two-speed function went. The other weak spot may be the light and speed toggle switches - not the best place to put them...

But I will take the time and go to the expense to fix them because they just keep going. I look at that tiny little worm gear the same way I do the plastic top gear on a Singer 457. It's a huge pain to replace... but once you've spent the three or four hours your 457 will last another 40 years. The worm gears, as far as I know, are not being reproduced but there are places online where you can find used -but working- embroidery attachment mechanisms.  Without the unit, the machine is still a fine zig-zag machine.

All that aside... and considering what you've written so far, and that you shared it with all of us... it sounds like you're having lots of fun with your Supernova. The rest really isn't important. Enjoy the moment. For me... fixing and saving the machine brings just as much joy (if not more) than using the machine. I seriously doubt that I will hang on to four Supernovas (oops, six if you count the two BFs) for the rest of my life, and to be honest, I really do favor the less complicated BU, Nova, and Mirra machines - and eventually every last one of them will fail. Yeah, I know, but it's true. It's part and parcel of enjoying a vintage machine, the chance we take. Every time we use it we cause more wear, but they were built to handle a lot of use: machine for a lifetime.... and in many cases these machines are working on their second and third lifetimes!

So... if your Supernova does eventually fail, will you find another one...

or become the first person to come up with an easy worm gear replacement? 

I'd bet on the latter...

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #10 
Jim, I read your comments with interest. I have been collecting, repairing, refurbishing and restoring sewing machines for about 12 years now, and fell in love with the Singer 201 and Necchi Supernovas a long time ago. As a result, I have several of each now, plus the Singer 1200 (knee lift model) and a 201K with hand crank. On the other side, when it comes to Necchis, I only care about the Supernovas. Earlier and later models have come within range, the Supernovas are the only Necchis in my stable. I have two types - the Supernova Automatica and the Supernova Automatica Mark II. For those not aware of the obvious differences, the Mark II went to a painted hand wheel rim, vice the plated rim of the earlier model, and the spring spool pins on the top of the Supernova were replaced with rear mounted, angled pins on the Mark II. 

The Achilles heel of the Supernovas is the transformer. When it goes, often we are left with no light and full power only. These are nearly impossible to find used, and rarely are they in top form. However, my research shows that they can be rebuilt. It can be farmed out for big bucks, but can be done at home by a competent craftsman or "backyard tinkerer" as I have been called. It does require some knowledge, so I recommend going on line for some education on transformer building and rebuilding. There is a lot of useful stuff to read and watch on Youtube. 

The other problem is the switches, which were placed in harms way and are often broken off. Some have jury rigged a new lever using screw-in mini eye screws or other fixes, but I found after disassembling one of the switches that the plastic part can actually be re-created by turning and filing one on a drill press and bench vice. All they are is a ball with the lever on one end and a pointed cone on the other. Anyone can make replacements by turning one at home by hand. I have made lots and lots of parts this way, so these switch levers can be done. I purchased some nylon bolts to use as blanks, but haven't put them to turning yet. It's a Winter project on the to-do list. 

I have 5 Supernovas at present, two are my wife's - the ones in salmon pink and cream - the other 3 are mine, in the green and cream. One is not working (the transformer is shot) and the rest are working fine. I was lucky enough to snag one of them on Shopgoodwill with the molded portable case with the folding bed extension on the machine. Quite a coup as these are not often seen. 

I really love the Supernovas, but don't use them much. That's only because my collection is so big (thanks to discovering Shopgoodwill!) and choosing a machine for a project often comes down to what is close at hand. As a last note, the light bulb can be purchased at any auto parts store - it's a dome light too. 

- Bruce 1. Case front.jpg  6. Supernova Automatica front view.jpg 

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #11 
Jim,

Some very interesting historical perspective.  I can really appreciate now after having used both the Supernova and 201 how they both came in tops is such a testing.  I feel very fortunate I now have a beautifully functioning Supernova and since it is in a treadle I don't have to worry about the electrical issues.  You have a great point - just enjoy it now and if the worm gear fails I'll deal with it then.  I have such great respect for you and others who work to get these machines functioning and can understand the joy it brings you.

Bruce,

Very good info on the transformer rebuilding.  It's wonderful to have the skills to be resourceful to do this work along with remaking the switches.  How would you deal with a broken worm gear? And maybe you can treadle your non-working one if you don't rebuild the transformer?

So far, my Necchi Supernova Automatica is superb in it's decorative stitch flexibility and quality - the filled stitches (such as satin and tapered satin) surpass what I can do on my Singer slants.  I love the vertical bobbin and the ability to use thicker threads in the bobbin. I think I can relate to why you love this machine and have a collection of them!




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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #12 
Chaly, I haven't encountered a broken worm gear in any of my Supernova's (knock on wood!), but have had to replace gears in later model Singer machines (413, 620, 750, 6268). The main thing holding me back on doing the transformer is time and a good supply of the proper size wire, plus a hundred other projects! I could treadle the one head, I suppose, but have enough treadles already. Too many, in fact, and I'm behind in getting some of them finished so I can move them out. 

- Bruce
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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #13 
Thank you for pointing me to pics of you Supernova treadle, Chaly. [smile] She's a beauty! Love that cabinet! And such a deal!!! I've only seen one Supernova treadle come up for sale locally in 7 or 8 years of looking on CL. The Supernova I ended up getting is electric (with the "punch-tabs" for the treadle belt) in a good-sized cabinet that was made in Germany. (The machine was brought to the US from Germany by the seller's grandmother.) So I am still on the lookout for an inexpensive Necchi BU to put into a Singer treadle (because unless my current BU's motor dies I'm not keen on taking it out of its cabinet and drilling the hinge pin holes bigger in it - I'd rather find a spare [smile]).
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageGalKim
So I am still on the lookout for an inexpensive Necchi BU to put into a Singer treadle (because unless my current BU's motor dies I'm not keen on taking it out of its cabinet and drilling the hinge pin holes bigger in it - I'd rather find a spare [smile]).


Good luck there. I have a really bad habit of liking a vintage machine sooo much that I run out and find another one for a spare. I have yet to find a spare BU. (1948-1952 with the VN on the deck). Don't count out the Nova BU. It's quite nearly the same machine as the BU with some minor refinements, and it's often a little easier to find (which is why I have 3?). I missed out on a free BU over the weekend, still bummed out over that, but one will turn up. Also, the Supernovas came in a BU option, same graceful lines but a straight stitch only. That would be interesting as a treadle. =)

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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #15 
A straight stitch Supernova would be a BF. BU machines are zigzag capable.

Cari

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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #16 
Yep. Supernova BF. That would still be interesting. I don't think they made the Nora with the belt pop-outs but maybe...
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Ericka

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Reply with quote  #17 
I never understood why Necchi did their twin-needle design with the second needle behind the first needle.  I got a Supernova Julia which included all the attachments for cheap at a thrift store, and after a great deal of time and alcohol, finally got the zigzag functions to work.  But I never even tried the double-needle function because I just couldn't see the use of it.  Anybody ever find a use for that?

Ericka
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Madmurdock75

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ericka
I never understood why Necchi did their twin-needle design with the second needle behind the first needle.  I got a Supernova Julia which included all the attachments for cheap at a thrift store, and after a great deal of time and alcohol, finally got the zigzag functions to work.  But I never even tried the double-needle function because I just couldn't see the use of it.  Anybody ever find a use for that?

Ericka


I think it was supposed to be decorative.

They couldn't do side by side, AFAIK, since it's a side loading bobbin. You need a front loader for that kind of twin needle stitching.

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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #19 
What Violet said. [wink]

Which is why I would still love a Singer 224 (i think that's the right model - Japanese made front loading 15 with a few extra stitches built in and came in a treadle. Swoon.)

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Ericka

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Reply with quote  #20 
Yeah, I think it was just a marketing gimmick.  Everybody else was starting to do twin needle sewing, so they needed to do it, too.  Just, with a side-loading bobbin, you couldn't do a side-by-side twin needle.  I'm wondering how many people got surprised by that strange little arrangement and were turned off by it.  Bet their sales people tried their best to NOT demonstrate that feature, lol.

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Chillin in NC

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Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ericka
and after a great deal of time and alcohol, finally got the zigzag functions to work.


Was the alcohol for you or the machine? Curious minds want to know. LOL

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Ericka

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chillin in NC


Was the alcohol for you or the machine? Curious minds want to know. LOL


LOL, I probably should have used some alcohol for me, but I'm just not into rubbing alcohol, what can I say...

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VintageGalKim

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[rofl]
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #24 
Free motion quilting with a double needle Necchi is awesome. You get a really nice ribbon effect without having to quilt the project twice.

Cari

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Ericka

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Reply with quote  #25 
Ah, now there's a really good use that I can see.  Thanks, Cari.
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Cecilia

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Reply with quote  #26 
I bet that the fancy cam stitches would also look fun with the double needle. Even just a zigzag would look nifty!
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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #27 
Ooooh, now I hadn't thought of that, Cari!  I treadle my FMQ, but I can't wait to try this out! [biggrin]
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Janeiac

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Reply with quote  #28 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageGalKim
I am still on the lookout for an inexpensive Necchi BU to put into a Singer treadle (because unless my current BU's motor dies I'm not keen on taking it out of its cabinet and drilling the hinge pin holes bigger in it - I'd rather find a spare [smile]).


Alternatively, you could grind down cabinet hinge pins so they fit into the holes on the Necchi bed; that’s what I did so I could use a different brand cabinet.
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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #29 
Yeah, I am aware that I could do that, but I don't want to take it out of the cabinet it is in - it's one of the cool ones that looks like a file cabinet or set of drawers but has the pull-out chair with storage. I'm just hoping to find a second one on the cheap, drill out the hinge pin holes, and put in my small Singer parlor cabinet. [smile]
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #30 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janeiac


Alternatively, you could grind down cabinet hinge pins so they fit into the holes on the Necchi bed; that’s what I did so I could use a different brand cabinet.

The difference is minuscule. No, really. It's not like some sort of major operation where you need goggles and a bench grinder. It's a hand file and a few rubs, turn, and a few rubs, turn, and then try the pin. It's like a millimeter too thick; crazy small difference, but -just- enough. Perhaps the thing to do to save both the cabinet and the BU... is to find a spare set of hinge pins, shave those down the hair that needs to be shaved, and there you go. You're set for whatever happens next. =)

*ps. Took me three years to find that same cabinet. Am not giving it up, or the perfect green Mira within.

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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #31 
Good to know, Jim! The tutorial I saw years ago involved a drill and sounded a bit more tricksy. Also, I decided to recheck the electricals in my cabinet, and it has one of those two-outlet boxes down inside. The light is plugged into one outlet and the motor into the other - so taking it out for a spin in my treadle might not be as tricksy as I thought.

Where can I see a pic of you similar cabinet - is it in a thread here? Mine is not in excellent shape - I'd say fair, but it is oh so cool and convenient! I just love it with the two drawers under the bench seat. [biggrin]

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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #32 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageGalKim
Good to know, Jim! The tutorial I saw years ago involved a drill and sounded a bit more tricksy. Also, I decided to recheck the electricals in my cabinet, and it has one of those two-outlet boxes down inside. The light is plugged into one outlet and the motor into the other - so taking it out for a spin in my treadle might not be as tricksy as I thought.

Where can I see a pic of you similar cabinet - is it in a thread here? Mine is not in excellent shape - I'd say fair, but it is oh so cool and convenient! I just love it with the two drawers under the bench seat. [biggrin]


https://www.victoriansweatshop.com/post/necchi-10351278?pid=1310052656

Tenth one down. I should get a better pic of the cabinet to you. There probably are better pics from a couple years back. Mine is missing the cushion, but plans are afoot. It makes up for this by having two complete sets of attachments for the Mira including two Wonder wheels. And yeah-No, I'm not drilling out the machine. If some next-to impossible thing were to happen, then I'd rather the hinge pin broke, not the machine casting. Hinge pins are way cheaper.

Screen Shot 2020-07-16 at 6.36.10 PM.png   


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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #33 
Oh yours is very pretty! Love that nice blonde mid-century look! Mine looks like mahogany maybe. It's made to look like it has one drawer because it has just the one handle. When I found it on CL (for $15) I had never seen one of its type before, but I knew I wanted a Necchi. $20 later it was mine. The gal had made her wedding dress on it. She doubted it would work well because the tension was all wonky. A good cleaning and lot of oiling and lot of running it and it sewed like a champ. [wink]  Cuz Necchis just want to be run! [biggrin]
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #34 
Really interesting aside... Pfaff sold very similar cabinets and the real shocker, so did Montgomery Wards. Love them. So compact!
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Pabry

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Reply with quote  #35 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageGalKim
Which is why I would still love a Singer 224 (i think that's the right model - Japanese made front loading 15 with a few extra stitches built in and came in a treadle. Swoon.)


I’ve been enjoying my Franken treadle, a Japanese 226 in a Singer treadle, where the German Singer 66 used to occupy. I like the treadle’s speed control for fmq. Also, I jam up the bobbin area a lot, say by treadling the pedal backwards (newbie here). It’s easier to reach underneath to clean up. The 226, like the 224, doesn’t have any built in stitches. It requires the flat cams for the ZZ and any decorative stitch.

The 66 is sulking in the 226’s carrying case for now. 😆

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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #36 
Oh I know, Jim! Some of those similar Pfaff cabinets are droolworthy!!! And if I recall rightly, the Necchis fit in them, don't they? 
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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #37 
Aaaah! Pabry! You have one! Yes, of course, silly me - I forgot - the 224 takes cams! I missed out on a 224 in a rather modern treadle cabinet. Still kicking myself. I felt it was overpriced, and it was far away, but uncommon as they are I shoulda just bought it.
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Pabry

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Reply with quote  #38 
Kim, i think we’ve all kicked ourselves at one point or another for missing out on a sewing machine. But eventually the machines come around again. I’m sure a 224 or 226 will be in your future.

Having read all the comments about the Necchi, it’s on my list, if only for the reason that it uses high shank feet. I have a stash of industrial feet I’ve wanted to try out. Is it wrong to buy an entire machine just so you can try out some feet? 😂
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ttatummm

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Reply with quote  #39 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim/Steelsewing
Really interesting aside... Pfaff sold very similar cabinets and the real shocker, so did Montgomery Wards. Love them. So compact!

My Pfaff in a compact cabinet.  It was the first machine in a cabinet I allowed to sneak into the house.  Boy, did that turn into a slippery slope.  I think part of the reason I got it is that I've always loved those Necchi cabinets.  That, and I wanted a 130.
pfaff.jpg


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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #40 
Yup. That's the one!

IMG_4167.jpg 
*Sis's is slightly different and the machine has the coffee grinder.
I haven't found another one, so my Pfaff 130 is in the "Hollywood" cabinet which is a monster 2-pedistal serious chuck o furniture. =)

and just for grins, here's the late 40s Montgomery Wards cabinet that I don't have, but wouldn't turn down:
Screen Shot 2020-07-17 at 6.45.13 AM.png 



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ttatummm

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Reply with quote  #41 
I haven't seen a cabinet that is exactly like the one my Pfaff came in. I've been looking just to know more about the history of the machine.

That Montgomery Wards cabinet is really nice.  Who woulda thunk.[smile]

The Hollywood cabinets are very, very cool looking, but they are huge.  Fortunately, I've never come across one or I might be tempted to try to shoe horn one into my little house.

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VintageGalKim

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Reply with quote  #42 
Tammy, your cabinet is gorgeous - I love it - especially that fab handle!

Jim, that is my cabinet exactly, trapezoidal handle included. I never expected to be as taken with the cabinetry as I am the machines!

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #43 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttatummm
I haven't seen a cabinet that is exactly like the one my Pfaff came in. I've been looking just to know more about the history of the machine.

That Montgomery Wards cabinet is really nice.  Who woulda thunk.[smile]

The Hollywood cabinets are very, very cool looking, but they are huge.  Fortunately, I've never come across one or I might be tempted to try to shoe horn one into my little house.


Very lovely cabinet, Tammy.  I have never seen one but I love them for taking up little real estate.
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Cecilia

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Reply with quote  #44 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pabry
Is it wrong to buy an entire machine just so you can try out some feet? 😂


Um, Pabry? Remember which website you’re on?

;-)

I think if you -don’t- do that, Steve might expel you. ;-)

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ChattyKathy

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Reply with quote  #45 
Pabry,
I just notice that you have have the foot pedal covered on your Franken treadle.  Can you please give more info how you have it covered?  Is it only a fabric cover or does it also have a board?  Does covering the foot pedal make it easier to sew?

I have a Singer 328 that I converted to a treadle with a 9 spoke hand wheel.  I love using this SM with its cams.
Thanks

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Pabry

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Reply with quote  #46 
Hi Kathy,
It’s just a fabric cover wrapped around the pedal and held attached with Velcro (hook and loop). The fabric is upholstery weight, layered over twice. I also considered doing something similar with cotton and some batting material, but I had this scrap upholstery fabric after practicing FMQ that turned out to be right width.

I prefer to cover pedal because I treadle barefeet and don’t like the feel of my feet on metal. Also, I don’t have a dust cover under the machine so it would rain little fuzz from the bobbin area and land between the metal grates. I got tired of trying to vacuum underneath the pedal.

I don’t find the pedal cover makes a difference for sewing. It’s just more of a preference.


Cecilia,
Thanks for contributing to my SMAD. 😂
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treadlecrazy

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Reply with quote  #47 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pabry
Kim, i think we’ve all kicked ourselves at one point or another for missing out on a sewing machine. But eventually the machines come around again. I’m sure a 224 or 226 will be in your future.

Having read all the comments about the Necchi, it’s on my list, if only for the reason that it uses high shank feet. I have a stash of industrial feet I’ve wanted to try out. Is it wrong to buy an entire machine just so you can try out some feet? 😂


The Necchi BU and Necchi Supernova do have a high shank, but their needle alignment is not standard, so most modern high shank feet will not work. This was a disappointment to me when I got mine, since I'd not seen this feature mentioned anywhere. Everyone just says they are high shank, and I was disappointed to find I couldn't use my industrial straight stitch foot on it.

They are intended to straight stitch in the needle left position, and you need a Necchi brand straight stitch foot to make this work. The Japanese made high shank left needle position straight stitch feet are meant for a slightly different alignment and the needle will hit the foot.

If you put the needle in the center position and try to put an industrial high shank straight stitch foot on, again, the needle will hit the foot.

I have a high shank snap-on adaptor, and I can use some modern zig-zag feet on the Necchis, such as a blind hem foot or edge stitching foot, where the exact needle position is not critical.

There is an advantage to the non-standard Necchi needle position. When you put on the original Necchi zig-zag foot, the distance from the needle in the center position to the right edge of the foot is 1/4". This is very handy for garment sewing when you need to switch to this smaller seam allowance temporarily.

I suppose you could adjust the needle alignment so you could use industrial feet (easy to do on the Necchi BU, not sure how to do that on the Supernova), but then you wouldn't be able to use the original Necchi feet.

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Pabry

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Reply with quote  #48 
Thanks Leila. I hadn’t considered how Necchi sets the home position for the needle position. I’ll keep this in mind when I’m ready to look for a Necchi.
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