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Aleda J

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Reply with quote  #1 
Does anyone have any information on this machine? Badged Maywood & made by National, I can find no record of this model. It came to me missing the handwheel/crank assembly, had been packed in grease & stored somewhere for a long time.
After replacing the missing feed dog bracket & spring with parts from a Singer 12 it sews just fine, a little difficult turning the shaft by hand though lol!

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #2 
I've never seen one like this with the transverse shuttle, but National made this head for a lot of machines. Being the same almost exactly as my New National, made by New Home, Carter Bays' Encyclopedia of American Sewing Machines says Maywood was made by Goodrich. So many machine makers copied each other it's impossible to sort them out in reality. Getting a geared hand wheel for your machine will be quite a quest, I believe. Here is a photo of my New National. Versions of this were also made with a standard wooden base. I read that my New National was originally made for the French market, thus the porcelain knob and metal base. 

Mine, of course, is a vibrating shuttle machine. 

-Bruce 1. New National- front view.jpg  2. New National - head view.jpg  3. New National - bobbin winder.jpg  4. New National - hand crank and gears.jpg 

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Aleda J

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Reply with quote  #3 
At first I thought Goodrich but the serial # & placement doesn't follow Goodrich. The National High Arm Singer, a ts machine, has the serial # on the stitch length regulator plate as does this machine & in the same format. The National Arlington, a vs, has the same body shape as this, & Arlington was another of the Cash Buyers Union badges. I believe my Maywood ts was provided to CBU by National before they developed the Arlington.
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #4 
Much of the information I have comes out of Carter Bays' encyclopedia, which has been criticized for having mistakes that went uncorrected in later editions. So, who knows....! 

As for the Nationals and Arlington, Carter Bays lists my Arlington as being made by Davis, which seems strange to me since it doesn't seem to have many Davis features and uses a 20x1 needle. My Arlington No.2 Coffin top treadle is being restored (an ongoing project off and on for the last 2 years, which I would love to finish this year) and one of the features I have to replicate is the Cash Buyer's box top decal. That's going to be a major effort involving a lot of hand artwork and MS Powerpoint or Linux LibreOffice Draw. I already had to hand carve a replica of one of the missing cast iron leg logo bars. It came out well, though - hardly noticeable. Also, missing moldings, missing hardware, but the machine is pretty cool and a smooth sewer. Also a vibrating shuttle machine. You can see the body style was common as clay in those days, which I can only pin down to 1890s to early 1900s. 

Photo of the head is as-found. I will be taking a photo set when finished. I should post some of the restoration steps on this toy.  DSCF0046.jpg  DSCF0053.jpg 

-Bruce DSCF0044.jpg 

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Aleda J

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Reply with quote  #5 
Yeah, that sure looks like a National to me. The bobbin winder has the horizontal slot that I have only seen on National & Goodrich. I use serial # placement & format also as manufacturers didn't change that for one model. Placement of the number, the number of digits & whether or not there is a letter are hugely indicative of manufacturer. If a Davis of that era had a 5 digit number & yours has a letter followed by 6 digits then it can't be a Davis sort of thing.
You are really making a complete job of this restoration, super impressive!
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #6 
Nice machines. I noticed you both mentioned CBU. I have a set of 4 CBU drawers if either of you know of someone looking for some. Very good condition with the round brass CBU pulls.

Cari

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macybaby

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Reply with quote  #7 

That New National hand crank is made by New HOme, not National.   Both companies have a distictive top tension so it's easy to tell them apart.

That Arlington has a lot of the look of  June Mfg,  which joined with Eldredge to become National.  I've got one very similar and it does seem to be a bit of a hybrid between the two.   Chicago Mfg is another that is similar and hard to tell apart.  Both June and Chicago were not in business all that long,  so not a lot about them is out there.

I've done a study on attachments,  and found that often you could determine the machine by what attachments fit,  as often there is just enough difference between them for that.   The one exception is that Goodrich is almost a perfect match for National. 

I don't like when people say a machine is National when it was made before National was formed, and is actually a Eldredge Mfg machine. 



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macybaby

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Reply with quote  #8 
NOTE  - I don't know much about European machines, but for US machines,  this is helpful to determine the Mfg

For reference = this is the top tension used by New Home,  there are some vairations and often the lever part is missing, but New Home used a metal foot that attached to the front pillar for the top tension, - notice the back is flat.



Here is what National used



And Standard - the distinctive part here is the rounded end of the tension plate that fits over the back pillar.




And as far as I'm been able to determine,  Singer never made a top tension machine.


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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks for sharing that!  Cool.
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Aleda J

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Reply with quote  #10 
Thanks for the reply Macy. As to calling the machine a National rather than an Eldredge I would have to have a solid indication that it is pre 1890 to call it an Eldredge & I don't. Some maufacturers adopted the transverse shuttle when it was long out of date (Singer 48) so I can't assume this is that old just because it is a ts machine.
As mentioned it has the National/Goodrich cam style bobbin winder with the horizontal slot, National/Goodrich style top tension, National style 'otter tail' lever for the presser foot, & the serial number placement & format are only consistent with National.
Jon Helig remembers someone mentioning this National Saxonia type model so I hope to make contact at some time with someone who has a bit more information.

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #11 
macybaby -- thanks for that pictorial guide to top tensions! 

paul

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macybaby

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Reply with quote  #12 
Sorry  Aleda,  I was not insinuating that you were doing that,  I was only stating that it bugs me when people do that.   I've run into a lot of people that think Eldredge is only a badge name for National. 

It's always neat when you find an "old ball" machine.   Those are the ones that I still get a bit excited about.

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Aleda J

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Reply with quote  #13 
Thanks Macy, & yes, it is the oddballs that capture my interest now.
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Aleda J

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Reply with quote  #14 
Wow, yes that is different info than in Needlebar. They say Eldredge became National in 1890 but the Eldredge name continued to be used on some models.
Nothing is easy about verifying things 100 years & more after the fact.😊
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #15 
I read somewhere that National acquired Eldredge during the 1910s, but of course that could be wrong too. I do know that my Eldredge Two-Spool treadle dates to about 1914-16, and a couple of National Two-Spool heads that are identical and date to about WW1 to early 1920s. 

From that period on, National owned the Eldredge name and continued to use it. I have a National-made Eldredge S-40 long bobbin machine made in 1941 (hence the S-40 designation) complete with original case and manual in near-new condition. 

It must have thrilled someone in 1941 to get a "modern" looking machine in crinkle finish brown and the latest styles with all the fantastic features one would expect on a machine from the 1870s. Obviously no patent infringements on this baby. At least it had a motor and foot control. That fit the 1940s. 

- Bruce 1. Front view complete.jpg  2. Head view.jpg  3. Handwheel view.jpg  5. Drive spindle detail.jpg  6. Stitch length knob and bobbin winder stowed.jpg  8. Bobbin winder drive belt in position.jpg  9. Flat leaf top tension with release tab.jpg  11. Shuttle and carrier.jpg

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Aleda J

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Reply with quote  #16 
Wow! Love that 'full moon' plate! The thrill of ultra-modern good looks combined with the comfort of known reliable technology... 😊
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #17 
That's pretty cool.  I can see wanting one now...   but not in 1941.  :-)
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macybaby

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Reply with quote  #18 
That round plate machine was also something I just had to have once I learned about it!
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seb58

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Reply with quote  #19 
Wow that 1940s round plate machine is something you don't see everyday! As you said a mid-century clad Victorian lady! Very cool indeed!
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