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Sandy R

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Reply with quote  #1 
Here are some pics of the Singer 99 I found on craigslist for $20.  Unfortunately, the japanning has suffered, with pin rash and chips galore.  What little of the decals remain have turned silver. 

DSC01680_resize.JPG 

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DSC01684_resize.jpg 



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Sandy R

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Reply with quote  #2 
The bentwood case has fared a bit better.  It is mostly sound, but starting to delaminate in places.  The bottom part is cracked on the front left, with the support wedge of wood detached.  Perhaps someone dropped it?



DSC01691_resize.JPG 

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Sandy R

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Reply with quote  #3 
The electronics are downright scary.  I suppose the mechanism in the lower left connected to a knee bar, which is long gone.

DSC01697_resize.JPG 

Because of this, I'm seriously considering converting this machine to a hand crank powered one.

The bobbin area was fairly clean, and contained a full old style bobbin.

DSC01685_resize.JPG 

All in all, I think I got my $20 worth!  Now the fun begins...

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davevv

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Reply with quote  #4 
Yup, worth $20.  Your wiring actually looks pretty good.  Hard to say for certain from the pictures but it's much better than mine was when I got it.  Even if it's bad though, it can be repaired.
This is the 99 I have as it was when I got it.  Looks pretty good already, right?
[DSCN0237-XL] 

But look at the wiring.
[DSCN0239-XL] 

Inside the motor was just as bad, but that can all be fixed.  New wires in the motor. What came out is laying on the table behind it.
[DSCN0233-XL] 

There is an excellent tutorial on rewiring at this link: http://vssmb.blogspot.com/search/label/rewiring.  He shows a different machine, but the information still applies to your 99.

This guy (http://www.singeroriginalvintageproducts.com/Pages/Singer99SewingMachineOriginalVintageParts.aspx) used to have reproduction knee bars, but they were about $35 IIRC.  I don't know if he still has them.  By the way, there are about three different types.

The 99 is a nice little machine.  You'll like it when you get it going, and getting there is half the fun.



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davevv

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Reply with quote  #5 
I looked and found the that the guy with the kneebars is moving his site to a new host.  You won't find them at the link I posted above, but you can find them on his new site here: https://www.singersewingmachinesreplacementparts.com/bentwood-case-knee-bar.html

I was right about the price.  They run $30-$40 depending on which style you need.

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Sandy R

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks, Davevv, for the information.  I'll keep that in mind as the work progresses.
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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #7 
I like my 99k, but getting the bobbin case in and out is a real pain! Tammi at the Archaic and Arcane website gives a very good description of how to do it, but I still found it took a lot of wiggling. Still, you don't have to do it too frequently.
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Sandy R

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Reply with quote  #8 
Yes, Tammi has an excellent website; I found it about a week ago and have been reading  through the posts and comments.  So much great information!  I haven't gotten to cleaning the bobbin area yet.  I'm still researching how to clean the machine and wood case without further damaging them.  So far, the only thing I've damaged was the bobbin winder tire:  it crumbled as soon as I touched it.  It must have been the original one.
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #9 
I have a 99 that matches yours. Mine had a rusty bobbin area. The wires shot, finish worn, pin rash, decals silvered and case in bad shape. I put on a HC and use it all the time. It is my grand daughter's go to machine. i love that machine for button holes. Mine barely makes a sound. I have another hand crank machine I don't like nearly as much because the hand wheel seems possessed. The ugly one is well behaved. Maybe someone knows how. To tame a hand wheel.
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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #10 
I believe you have to modify the hand wheel on a 99 to accept the hand crank assembly, if the wheel is solid, not spoked. Doesn't look too hard. I saw a tutorial on it on the Treadle On site.
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #11 
Margaret, I pulled a handwheel of a junkier 66 and itfitjust fine. The bobbin winder had to lose a screw.
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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #12 
Miriam, did the bobbin winder still work?
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #13 
It does since I lost that screw but I use a side winder anyway.
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CherylsTeapots2Quilting

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Reply with quote  #14 
I found my 99 a couple of years ago, in about that shape.  I cleaned it up and turned it into a hand crank (wiring scares me).  Mine is great for paper piecing.  Any other piecing, and it tends to need it's tension adjusted over and over. 

Cheryl in Illinois
http://cherylsteapots2quilting.blogspot.com/2013/01/cleaning-sewing-machines.html
http://cherylsteapots2quilting.blogspot.com/2012/10/new-machine-and-life-happenings.html
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #15 
Cheryl,have you taken the tension apart down to the pin? Clean it real good. Some times that pin gums up and nothing works right.
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Skipper

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Reply with quote  #16 
I always clean the tension on my 99(Miriam got this one for me). I very seldom have to adjust the tension on this 99. It so so smooth and very nice stitches. I just thread it up and sew with no problems and it has no problem with any thread. Love this machine.
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CherylsTeapots2Quilting

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miriam
Cheryl,have you taken the tension apart down to the pin? Clean it real good. Some times that pin gums up and nothing works right.


I haven't done this.  The tension stays nice with paper piecing, but, not with anything else.  I just try to remember to check it often when I sew something else on that machine.  Maybe I'll take it apart and clean it next time I pull it out.

Thanks,

Cheryl in Illinois

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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #18 
Its a five minute job- likely taking you longer to mess with it all the time...
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Sandy R

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Reply with quote  #19 
After much cleaning, oiling, gluing, and polishing, my Singer 99 is looking much healthier:

DSCI0013_resize.JPG 

the bare metal chips, pin rash and bed perimeter were painted with 1 coat of gloss black rustoleum enamel paint.  The rest of the shellacked area was wiped down with sewing machine oil.

The bentwood case was separating at one side, and the wood veneer was loose, so some gluing was in order:

DSCI0014_resize.JPG 

After the glue was left overnight to cure, the case was wiped down with Old English furniture polish, as the wood was very dry:

DSCI0016_resize.JPG 

The motor, light and ceramic knee controller were removed, as I will add a hand crank in the future.  I threaded it up and got it to produce some healthy stitches.  It's hard to see in this photo, but the 3 short segments of off-white stitches at the upper left were made on this machine by turning the hand wheel:

DSCI0018_resize.JPG 



"It's alive, it's alive!"






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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #20 
Woo Hoo!!!  Well done!
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Mickey

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Reply with quote  #21 
I like my 99. The bobbin case comes out and goes back in very easily once you under stand the procedure; slide bobbin lid completely off, lever lifts up and towards you, notice the correct position of hook and race (there are clear illustraitons in the manual). The bobbin case just rests on top of it. In the start I fiddled too, but I use mine regularly and have developed a feel for it. I know it's easy to forget all the details when we don't do this regularly (I still have to remind my self going from one machine to another, especially needle threading from either left or right). The bobbin case on my 201 is a bit more fuzz.

I kept the motor and lights on my 99. I'm used to having both my hands on the fabric, and for more than a few inches of precision stitching and maybe the the buttonholer, I don't think a hand crank will be used that much by me. My machine dates to 1934 and when the wiring was replaced, motor cleaned and regreased, it turned out like new. Mine has the knee lever speed control too; if you ever get it rewired I'm sure you will adjust to it very quickly. Model 99 is easily underestimated, it's a nice, well behaved machine worthy of regular use.
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CherylsTeapots2Quilting

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Reply with quote  #22 
I got a new Singer 99k last weekend, at a quilt show.  Only $10, so I couldn't pass it up.  I cleaned it today, but, for some reason, the stitches are terrible, with tons of loops on the bottom.  I tried to adjust the tension, but, it didn't help any.  This was the third machine I'd cleaned today, so, I may have threaded it wrong (all three machines thread differently).  I was too tired to keep messing with it (and hubby was hungry for supper).  The Singer 99k is at the bottom of this blog post http://cherylsteapots2quilting.blogspot.com/2017/03/cleaning.html
I'll mess with the stitches again later.  At the moment this machine has stayed an electric, but, the motor runs slowly, and the wiring to the light (only) is bad, so, it may not stay an electric for long.  Also, the presser foot keeps sticking, so, I guess it has more cleaning in it's future, since there was so much dried oil on this machine.  I'm guessing I missed some dried oil.  Oh well.

Cheryl in Illinois
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Mickey

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Reply with quote  #23 
Like you mention, double check threading route; on  my machine it's spool pin - thread guide - between the disks in the tensioner - then the hook shaped thing just left of the tensioner before (!) - the take up lever - then aim for the thread guide on the faceplate - then needle.  Remember it threads from left to right (!) which is the oposite of most models, needle inserts flat side to the right.  The bobbin turns the opposite of  my 201 too, which means when pulling the thread it's anti-clockwise on a 99. I have the older version of this model and top tension adjusts with a simple nut, no dial or numbers like the later version with stitch length lever. Which version do you have?

As you know, the tension disks and parts sometimes need to come appart and have a good cleaning. Make sure the pin in there moves and frees up the thread when the presser bar lever is in up position and grips the thread in down position. Tension should increase gradually as it's turned in.

For the cleaning, it took me a while before I realised the shafts of the presser bar and needle bar should be oiled, and on my machine it took at least two days before the needle bar freed up completely. At the time I used spray can oil thinking it would dissolve a lot of grime and dirt (it did) and then went for basic sewing machine oil. No I would recommend something with teflon; after I started using Finish Line Ceramic wet lube it turnes very smoothly and I still use this. It's a bit in the direction of Triflow.

Under the base there's lots of hinges and a cam like parts moving the feed dogs. At the ends of the rods there are oil points, and you might need extra light to detect them. There's four holes on top of the main body needing more than a drop of oil if it's been a while, and lots of points to be oiled behind the faceplate. If the machine is still a bit dirty you might as well keep a good layer of paper towels at the bottom of the case the next few days. It can take quite some time before dirt and grime in hinges and moving parts are flushed out. I deliberately over oil a bit until it the oil I apply stays clean and clear; wiping off dirty oil and reapplying new everytime I get a chance.

My machine was very stubborn the first period. It freeing up and everything worked well before it gummed up again if it was left a few days. It took me about a week with daily applications of oil and a bit if test sewing before it was as it should be. The major issue was the stitch length function, I had to screw the knob in and out several times, applying oil to the threading. With the knob turned in (maximum movement of parts invovled) I oiled and ran the machine for half a minute or so, and reapplied. The hand wheel can be a bit stubbern too, tilt the machine towards the right when tending to the tiny oil point on top, furthest to the right. To get oil to run all the way along the axle to the stop motion screw it takes some effort unless you take the hand wheel off. These things tend to sort them selves out when the machine is taken back in regular use and a bit of tentative oiling.

By this point I have polished the needle and presser bar, the black finish is cleaned and I have used car polish on it. There are signs of age and wear but it's a nice and very capable machine. When you get around to tend to all the little details a 99 is really lovely to use and look at :- )
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #24 
Needle goes flat side to the needle bar curved side toward the hook. Double check needle direction.

My beater99 was ticking along yesterday when it pretty well seized up. I figured a chunk of lent was in the bobbin area. I took it all down, cleaned and oiled, checked the bearings and no joy. Did see some dried oil. So I oiled the top etc. no joy. I checked the HC and it was fine. I feel sort of stupid. It was when I juiced up the needle bar that she goes like magic again. That machine is so beat up but it sure does hand crank sweetly. Once you learn how there is something very satisfying about using an old beater with a hand crank.

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Rdavism

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Reply with quote  #25 
I just received a surprise machine via goodwill online. It is a 99, came with 4 bobbins, needles, scissors etc. It needs cleaned as covered in lint dust looking decades old. The bentwood case nice and came with kneebar. I know nothing about the 99s. How to I install the kneebar and how does it work without electrical input? Thank you for any guidance. Machine is cute.

Figured out how to install kneebar (hole in front).

Rebecca
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #26 
Rdavism, the 99 does need to be plugged in for the motor and controller to function. The knee bar female end fits into a male receptacle on the lower right front of the base. Photos of your machine will help.
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Rdavism

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Reply with quote  #27 
What are the wood wedges for I found in my bottom case?

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #28 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rdavism
... how does it work without electrical input? Thank you for any guidance. Machine is cute.
....


I think the manual can be found at https://res.cloudinary.com/singer-sewing/image/upload/fl_attachment/Singer-Website-Library/outdated_product/SINGER_99-13_Sewing_Machine.pdf
or https://res.cloudinary.com/singer-sewing/image/upload/fl_attachment/Singer-Website-Library/outdated_product/SINGER_99_Sewing_Machine.pdf

Janey

ETA - The bentwood case with knee controller, usually had the motor in the side behind where you put the knee bar, but I noticed yours has the motor on the back.

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Rdavism

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Reply with quote  #29 
Thank you.
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jplowrey

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Reply with quote  #30 
The wood pieces were originally glued into the four corners of the larger compartment of your bentwood case base.  You should see signs of the old glue there.  They're there to support the bed of the machine.  I'll get pictures and edit this post.

Edit - here are a couple of pictures showing the small wooden supports installed in the bentwood case base.  The supports with a leather pad tacked to them go in the front of the case and the leather acts as a cushion under the bed of the machine.

Right side of case, nearest controller

DSC_1054.jpg 

Left side of case, away from controller

DSC_1056.jpg


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Rdavism

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Reply with quote  #31 
Thank you
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CherylsTeapots2Quilting

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Reply with quote  #32 
Congrats on your new (to you) 99.  I turned my first (and almost all the rest of mine) 99's into hand cranks. 
https://cherylsteapots2quilting.blogspot.com/2012/10/new-machine-and-life-happenings.html
that post shows what my first 99 looked like when I got it (at the thrift store)

and this link (3rd photo down) shows it cleaned up.  
https://cherylsteapots2quilting.blogspot.com/2020/08/squishys-stitching-and-catching-up.html

Cheryl

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