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Sondra

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Reply with quote  #1 
I just got a 1919 Singer 16-88 yesterday. I have been trying to find any info at all on this model with no luck. I looked through the Smithsonian files, and didn't come up with much there either.  Does anyone have any instructions for adjusting, operating, oiling, etc? I have no experience with industrials at all.

It had been used last for upholstery work, and although the lady did nice work, she told me she had no knowledge of how to adjust the machine. She just had a local shop set it, and that's how she sewed with it. 
It looked like it hadn't been oiled in quite a while, and was linty inside. I did a few test stitches with it, and the foot that the needle goes through wasn't quite aligned, and was coming down on the edge of the outer foot till it snapped free and continued down to the material.
I got it basically cleaned out (dust and lint,) and oiled, and then re-set that presser bar. There was a nice (not really!) hole in the flat spring that goes on the shuttle race back. The location of the hole made me wonder how the needle got angled like that, and how on earth the machine was still stitching at all. 

I found a couple of differing references to the needle class needed, and am not sure what it takes. The lady had 2 completely different styles of needle with the machine. One had a round shank and the other had a flat shank. If anyone is familiar with this machine, I'd sure appreciate info or advice.
00000_hVtZssMPnzF_1200x900.jpg IMG_5072.JPG 




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Sondra
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Reply with quote  #2 
The 16-88 is an oscillating shuttle machine with independent upper and lower feed mechanisms, used for general work in cloth and leather. Organ makes a 16X1 round-shank needle that fits.
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #3 
That is a lot like my machine! I do not remember the number. It is a 16 something. I looked to see if I have pictures but not good enough to see much. Let me know if you find a manual. I got mine then ended up moving in with my parents as a caretaker. I haven't had much quality time with my machine. I just spent enough time to know it is a beast and will sew about anything. It should take a regular sized needle likely up to a 24. Mine came from a book re-bindery. It was used to sew leather covers on folio size books. They were selling it to make room for a longer arm machine that could sew bigger books. Mine has a needle feed foot. The needle foot swings to pull the material through. It works a lot like a Davis vertical feed. Davis has a long bobbin this takes class 15 if I remember right. Needles are no big deal to find.
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penny

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Reply with quote  #4 
http://www.sil.si.edu/DigitalCollections/Trade-Literature/Sewing-Machines/pdf/sil10-54.pdf  This has a little bit of info. It's only two pages.

Manual from the Singer site for model 16's.

http://www.parts.singerco.com/IPinstManuals/16-133_CLASS_16.pdf

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Sondra

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks for your replies! I'm waiting on needles so that I can play around with it, and experiment with setting the compound walking foot. The needle that was in it has a very nice fish-hook on the end. 
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Raftercrods

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Reply with quote  #6 
Looking for updated info on 16-88. I have rescued one and am trying to clean her up. Mud dobbers got to her, I am trying to determine how to best get the innards cleaned out.

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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raftercrods
Looking for updated info on 16-88. I have rescued one and am trying to clean her up. Mud dobbers got to her, I am trying to determine how to best get the innards cleaned out.


Had to look up similar model machines to see if there were any deck decals and all the pics I find say that there wasn't any. Considering that, and that the dirt on the deck is just that, dried mud, I'd say there are several ways to approach this.  All of these 'ways' require a pile of towels or rags. If you have a flexible hose shower head... then I 'd set some rags in the bath or shower floor and hose it off with warm water. Or, perhaps in the kitchen sink with one of those spray hoses. Failing either of those options, a large bucket of warm water and several cotton rags soaked down. You obviously  do not wish to get the underside soaking wet, but this would be just for the surface. I would resist rubbing the dirt as much as possible to keep any harder particles from scratching the deck paint.

Running water to me would be the least able to cause any marks. Once the majority of the crud has washed away, then I'd make certain to pat dry everything. Perhaps even a hair-drier on low, or set the machine on a towel in front of a fan. People say that you can 'wash' off an old black machine head with a soft rag and some warm water with a touch of mild dish soap (nothing harsh ie: no ammonia or bleach, I've used blue Dawn). Just be very gentle and make sure the machine dries quickly.

After all that... I would sit down with yet another clean rag and gently rub the machine down with sewing machine oil. Hopefully the wasps didn't make a mess underneath, but even then, I'd still take an oily rag to the underside. I'm going to be there anyways making sure all the linkages are clean and the oil points are serviced - and checking inside the post for more intruders.

The primary consideration here is to avoid any pressure in cleaning. Let water freely roll off most of the heavy muck. If it dries with a light dusty film, then that can be removed with a little sewing machine oil and a clean rag - gently. =)



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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hello,  We have both a 16-88 (sorry mine is older/1913) and a 16-188 (circa 1954).  They are the same machine except the bed on the 88 is an older style wider one and the 188 is modern narrower bed.  We have both now in beautiful tables.  I've attached a picture of the restored 16-88.  I need to take a picture of the 16-188 table and can get that tomorrow on this posted thread.  The 16-88 and 188 are great machines because the walking foot excels with vinyl and most especially clear vinyl (even more sticky) so I've read on upholstery forums where old timers state they are their favorite upholstery machine.  Not as smooth running as a needle feed combined with upper feed and many times the compound feed is just not needed 206rb and other clones of the Singer 111w.   I really really like these machines.  If you want to sell it just let me know....I probably would not be able to so no to the offer.  Picture attached of our in house cold cure japanning.  Next time around we will use polyurethane instead of spar varnish in our cold cure formula to see how it goes.  Best regards, Mike
edited to comment that the good picture may have to be clicked on...

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Madmurdock75

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Reply with quote  #9 
I don't know if anyone still needs it, but I have a class 16 manual which does mention the 16-188 (like the 16-88). 

 
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pdf 16.pdf (837.69 KB, 50 views)


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Raftercrods

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Reply with quote  #10 
Awesome to finally know the difference between the 16-88 and 16-188. Thrilled to have a manual. This machine is not going anywhere. I'm tackling in hopes to use it on leather and heavier fabric. She's starting to move smoother, now, with the manual I can see if I'm missing any other points. I've cleaned the under the feed dog, had the shuttle racer off. There is some rust in places. I'm going to focus on cleaning and oiling for now. I do have the table, just removed the head to clean. My son is an apprentice electrician and I've asked him to look at the motor and see if he can figure out if we can get it going. I know it needs a new cord. I also know I'm missing a part of the table to the 'treadle'? foot? Still trying to figure this thing out. 
I greatly appreciate the responses so far!

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Madmurdock75

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raftercrods
Awesome to finally know the difference between the 16-88 and 16-188. Thrilled to have a manual. This machine is not going anywhere. I'm tackling in hopes to use it on leather and heavier fabric. She's starting to move smoother, now, with the manual I can see if I'm missing any other points. I've cleaned the under the feed dog, had the shuttle racer off. There is some rust in places. I'm going to focus on cleaning and oiling for now. I do have the table, just removed the head to clean. My son is an apprentice electrician and I've asked him to look at the motor and see if he can figure out if we can get it going. I know it needs a new cord. I also know I'm missing a part of the table to the 'treadle'? foot? Still trying to figure this thing out. 
I greatly appreciate the responses so far!



If you post pics of the table, someone should be able to tell what's missing. Could it be the rod from the pedal to the motor, maybe?

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #12 
Hello,  OK I have three pictures of the Singer 16-188 so one can see the difference being only the more modern narrower bed.  This machine dates circa 1954.  I just purchased 1 kilo of asphaltum today at one of the hardware stores in the city I go to.  Last time on the 16-88 I melted with a heat gun into spar varnish but the problem with spar varnish is that it is a little rubbery and designed to "breath" for boat applications.  I did this because I'd read another's recipe where they used spar varnish.  I've tried crushing powder and it is near impossible because it just doesn't mix properly.  This stuff I get in chunks that look like obsidium rock or something and it literally drips off when hit with the heat gun so perfect.  I'll drip it into polyurethane varnish this time and should get a harder finish.  When doing this it takes many many coats with the first not even looking very black but eventually comes out black and shiny.  This time I will only do the bed of the machine and maybe a small area towards the front bottom of the pillar where material rubbed off finish with use.  I'll also do the hand wheel.  The table this time around was a diy butcher block of some exotic hardwood I can buy down the road.  I don't use glue but instead use two part color grey marine epoxy I can get by the gallon.  This stuff is a 50/50 mix so different than layup epoxy.  I then mix this coloring agent that is like a syrup into it that is brown.  It is supposed to be for polyester resin and does not work with layup epoxy but does work with marine epoxy.  Oddly it remains color grey after sanding after dry but as soon as it is wetted out with anything from water to varnish it turns the color of the coloring agent.  I've tried adding purple to it and it comes out a great looking sky blue for example (pool slides and other projects).  This type of table has been done on many projects now and barely to the left can be seen a similar "Singer" table for a 112w-139.  Everything from drawer to thread stand etc made on site.  I have on order a vintage table top industrial winder that will match the machine.  Hoping to get that soon.  To the right can be seen our Juki 5410-7 needle feed and under feed single needle high speed.  Both have 750w servo motors but the 112w to the left has a DC brushed 550w servo.  Those have to come from USA and I've found the 750w version bldc does a good enough job.  The covers are clear very thick vinyl I can buy in the city.  It is so thick it stands up on it's own and is about 5 dollars a yard.  Have to use dish washing soap with a sponge in the sink then let it sun dry to come out sparkly clear.  Likely this is too much information, TMI, but I really do like the 16-88/16-188 machines for many tasks.  They were made so long for a reason and subsequently cloned (like the Japanese REX 26-88 machines with an almost identical part number) and or improved on.  Cheaper to manufacture than a full compound feed, less complicated, and for upholstery do pretty good.  The Singer 111w series obviously was the replacement eventually but also more complicated and also subsequently cloned until today (Consew 206RB as one example).  Best regards,  4 pictures attached (I re attached the picture of the 16-88 with diy cold cure japanning as I think it was attached wrong yesterday).  Mike Singer16-188(1).jpg  Singer16-188(2).jpg  Singer16-188(3).jpg  Singer16-88.jpg
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #13 
Hello again,

  I've been told that the needle bar can be re adjusted and a 135x17 needle can be used on the machine by Bob at Toledo Industrial sewing.  The scarf will allow a closer timing to the hook.  I also use the stock needle but only because I ordered a bunch of them already in size 19 which is what I use with this machine ticket 30 thread (ticket 30 is same as v92 for upholstery people who typically use allot of v92 or v69) in either black (most of the time), grey, or gold.  The advantage to the 135x17 is that a huge array of needle points and types can be ordered as machines are still made for this needle (and lots of them) for different uses from leather to denim.  Maybe some day I'll re time for a 135x17 myself but no need for now or in near future.  We use 135x17 in some of our patchers here and the types of scarfs and points is almost dizzying if one searches around some.  Some of the points can really look very decorative from some of the work I've seen done.  For upholstery type work it doesn't really matter and same for denim.

Best regards,
Mike
edited to comment:  Some may notice I have empty electrical boxes on the wall.  This is a recent extension to our studio and not wired yet so we are temporarily using extension cords but the rest of the studio has outlets, breakers, etc.
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