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Christy

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Reply with quote  #1 
What batting do you prefer and why?  I've been experimenting just a little and am still unsure what I prefer.  

Cotton battings like Warm and Natural appeal to me because they can be washed and dried and I USE my quilts.   BUT, it's thin and doesn't accent the quilting much and creases when it's been folded for awhile.

I tried wool and loved the loft but made a mistake using "iron off chalk".  Where I ironed it, the batting got permanently squashed.  [frown]  I didn't realize you shouldn't iron it or use a hot dryer!  I've nervous about trying wool again without buying sew in care labels to warm myself or others about not using a dryer.

I just opened up some Hobb's 80/20 Heirloom cotton/poly batting and it looks super thin!

I am getting a quilt up on the frame now and was testing the idea of putting Warm and Natural under the 80/20.  It didn't feel too thick but when I was lifting the quilt it felt heavy.

What to do?

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  • Christy
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #2 
bamboo batting is the best IMO  also it is antimicrobial.  I use it for all of my under armor padding "quilts"
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #3 
My second quilt, a throw, has bamboo batting. It drapes very well, and warms quickly. It's probably 10 years old, so don't have a basis to compare to newer batting. The bamboo I used doesn't seem any thicker than the all cotton.
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Christy

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Reply with quote  #4 
I haven't tried bamboo before but it's interesting that it's anti-microbial.  I was a nervous mess today and couldn't make up my mind, stacking this or that with the quilt top to see how I liked it.  I finally decided to give the wool another try since I have just enough to do this quilt so we shall see.  I started basting it but ending up doing it over again because the bottom wasn't coming out straight.  I think I was smoothing the middle down too much and made a curve at the bottom.  I'll try again tomorrow.
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #5 
I use Pellon natures touch or whatever it's called, it's an 80/20 like Hobbs, in fact I can't tell the difference in a quilt. Yes it seems thin when you go to quilt it but after the quilt is washed and crinkles up it's just right and really warm. If you like the Warm and Natural but want more loft/weight try the Warm and Plush.

Cari

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Vicki

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Reply with quote  #6 
I use the 80/20 Warm and Natural but if you want extra loft you can use 2 battings, it will cost you more, but you could see if that's the look you'd like.   Vicki
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laurainalameda

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Reply with quote  #7 
I have had some real disasters with wool. unfortunately, I was the dumbass who put the quilt in the dryer.

now I go with 80/20 for donation quilts or bamboo for my quilts. I always use a flannel back, or almost always, and so that adds to the snuggle factor. if I'm really worried about a quilt providing warmth, I use polyfleece fabric in white or cream. this is generally for donation quilts for cold areas, or homeless folks. works quite well. I make my donations 60 by 80, so the fleece is wide enough.
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #8 
Here's something I learned the other day about bamboo batting, and bamboo textiles in general. It's not bamboo, it's rayon. It may start out as bamboo, but it has to go through the same heavy chemical process other wood fibers go through to become a workable textile, so the end result is rayon regardless of what it starts out as. And, the antimicrobial claims are supposedly BS because it can't survive the chemical process. So while bamboo is a sustainable, eco friendly go-green substance, the harsh process of making it a usable textile isn't eco friendly at all.

Cari

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #9 
That is not what we read years ago.  looks like it is time to hit the research again.
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #10 
What I read was an article from the FTC and another one from another agency I can't remember.

Cari

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #11 
Evidently there are three processes for making fabric. I think there is viscose, lyocell and linen. I found https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/CBD_FiberFacts_Bamboo.pdf but it doesn't say whether the antimicrobial qualities remain in the linen or Lyocell/Tencel process.

Janey

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Jpwest

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Reply with quote  #12 
I am about to embark on a summer weight quilt but I am stymied as to what batting to use. I am a very plain quilter and prefer the 30's patterns and fabrics - bright and white.  I don't want warmth but just a supplement to a sheet in the air conditioning in Kansas.

Which breathes better?  Cotton or polyester?  Any other suggestions?

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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #13 
Jpwest:  Quilter's Dream polyester was recommended by a quilt shop owner for a summer quilt I want to make.  She said that was the lightest weight batting she had.  Still have not used it, so cannot give final recommendation.  Reminds me to get started on that project!
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Mavis
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #14 
Polyester doesn't breathe like cotton does. I've read where some quilters don't use a batting at all for summer quilts just a top and bottom with minimal quilting.

Cari

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Vicki

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Reply with quote  #15 
You don't have to put batting in your quilt. Just your quilt top and a backing is fine.
Vicki
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