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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #1 
I recently made a Singer 99 base for my sister. A Kreg jig was used to drill pockets for screws, that hold joints. The screws are invisible front the outside. The screws 1 1/4" are high strength, self tapping, tighten with square bit. The advantage of screws, avoiding power tool dovetail joints common on original bases.

A 6' length of 3/4" x 2 1/2" red oak, 1/8" hardwood underlayment plywood, oak veneer, salvaged hardware.

The Kreg jig has setting for board thickness. An optional special vise grip pliers lock on wood. Holes are drilled with special step bit, with collar setting depth. The bit withdrawn clearing chips a few times. On assembly joints are clamped, and screws are driven. The clamping onto base board keeps top flush, joint clamp square and edge alligned.

Corner gussets were fabricated and glued in place.

15mm forstner bit was used for hinge pockets. A nut was drilled and tapped for adjustable depth collar.

After checking screws, veneer covered interior sides, hiding screws.

A second thread will be used for extension board fabrication.

Attached Images
jpeg 20190531_170952.jpg (159.69 KB, 20 views)
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jpeg 20190519_084846.jpg (137.32 KB, 21 views)
jpeg 20190605_075532.jpg (133.89 KB, 21 views)
jpeg 20190527_145924.jpg (99.90 KB, 19 views)


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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #2 
Nice work on the base!
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #3 
I made a few wooden bases for a couple of my Singers over the last couple of years, but haven't made the tops yet. They still sit on display in the wooden base. I always plan to, but then another treadle or other machine shows up. One I really am trying to get done is for my Singer 319 which I converted to hand crank. I still need the case top badly for that one and hope to get it done before Fall gets here. 

The wooden bed extensions on the 99 are neat. I copied the one that came on my Singer 99K and made 5 blanks, finishing 3 of them into final pieces. I used red oak for the beds, mahogany for the support, and hand sawed and finished the aluminum mounting pieces from aluminum angle stock. Slotted screws are a thing of the past, so I ordered some that are still being made for specialty use from a seller in New York in stainless steel. The extensions look like originals. I have one on one of my Singer 201 portables, one for my wife's grandmother's 99-13 and one I gave as a Christmas present to a friend for her 99K hand crank. 

Photos of one of my bed extensions and the Singer 319 hand crank machine with my home made base made from oak. The finger thing on the hand crank arm is because the unit sits out of line with the hand wheel on the 319 and rides up one side and down the other. This required a pressure finger to keep it down through the cycle. Also, the hand crank had to be mounted higher than the motor was, requiring another hole be drilled and tapped for it. This is my favorite hand crank - it has reverse and decorative stitches.  Repro Singer bed extension 1.jpg  Repro Singer bed extension 2.jpg  Repro Singer bed extension 3.jpg  Singer 319w hand crank assembly.jpg  Singer 319w hand crank finger tensioner.jpg  Singer 319w hand crank project case base with accessory box.jpg  Singer 319w hand crank project.jpg 

- Bruce

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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #4 
Very beautiful work! Absolute perfection. The Singer 319 is exotic.

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #5 
I've used a Kregs jig a lot, both for the cabinetry in our camper van, and for a sewing machine base for my HC 99.  My problem, and the reason I haven't used it again for a sewing machine base, is that I don't have a short enough square driver to put the pocket holes in the end pieces, and the divider -- the handle of my driver won't fit in the 6" or 7" of space available.  And if you put the pocket holes in the long pieces, the joint is exposed from the front of the base when on display.  Here's the 99 base, with the pocket holes on the long pieces:
    https://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/bases_8.jpg.html

So:  what kind of driver did you use?  As I write this, I'm realizing that a socket drive might work best.

paul

p.s. Because of my Kregs jig issue, I was forced to use rabbets and dados on my next bases.  They were made a lot easier after I figured out how to get my small CNC mill to cut the joints.  Probably the most accurate joints I've ever made:
    https://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/bases_5.jpg.html

p.p.s. And of course, the simplest bases, which work really well for older machines which don't have much mechanism "below the water line", can be made with just a jig saw from a piece of 1-1/2" butcher block:
    https://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/bases_1.jpg.html

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #6 
https://www.kregtool.com/store/c13/kreg-jigsreg/


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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #7 
Steve, Thanks for posting url, mine is R3, with optional clamp. Also shown 15mm bit with colar for hinge inlets.

Paul, I used a 1/8" square 1/4" hex driver, plus bit extension. Bit & wratchet from Kobalt set, picture below. Kobalt 0338358 35pc right angle bit driver.

Attached Images
jpeg 20190712_182504.jpg (150.27 KB, 6 views)
jpeg 20190712_182455.jpg (165.57 KB, 6 views)
jpeg 20190712_184906.jpg (219.12 KB, 5 views)


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pgf

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks.  I have the R3 kit as well.  I'll have to figure out a right-angle square drive of some sort.  Maybe I can cobble something together from all of different socket sets I have.

I'll have to think about whether that face clamp would help me -- it might.  I already have one of their right-angle clamps, which is pretty useful.

paul

Attached Images
jpeg kregclamp.jpg (58.59 KB, 7 views)


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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonesHand52
I made a few wooden bases for a couple of my Singers over the last couple of years, but haven't made the tops yet. They still sit on display in the wooden base. I always plan to, but then another treadle or other machine shows up. One I really am trying to get done is for my Singer 319 which I converted to hand crank. I still need the case top badly for that one and hope to get it done before Fall gets here. 

The wooden bed extensions on the 99 are neat. I copied the one that came on my Singer 99K and made 5 blanks, finishing 3 of them into final pieces. I used red oak for the beds, mahogany for the support, and hand sawed and finished the aluminum mounting pieces from aluminum angle stock. Slotted screws are a thing of the past, so I ordered some that are still being made for specialty use from a seller in New York in stainless steel. The extensions look like originals. I have one on one of my Singer 201 portables, one for my wife's grandmother's 99-13 and one I gave as a Christmas present to a friend for her 99K hand crank. 

Photos of one of my bed extensions and the Singer 319 hand crank machine with my home made base made from oak. The finger thing on the hand crank arm is because the unit sits out of line with the hand wheel on the 319 and rides up one side and down the other. This required a pressure finger to keep it down through the cycle. Also, the hand crank had to be mounted higher than the motor was, requiring another hole be drilled and tapped for it. This is my favorite hand crank - it has reverse and decorative stitches. 

- Bruce

Your work is stunning - a true match for the craftsmanship of vintage sewing machines!
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