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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #1 
Copied from Pictures of Your Machines (posts # 1895, # 1901)

Thanks Chaly!   On the black japanned surfaces, including the decals, I used a product called Restoration Polish For Vintage Sewing Machines, sold on eBay and Amazon.  It's marketed by a company called Sew Serious LLC.  The product comes with an applicator sponge, but I use small pieces of old t-shirts to apply and clean.  The old oil and dirt which comes off the machine will quickly turn the cleaning cloths black.  For every squirt of the polish I use a different area on the cleaning cloth, then just throw the cloth away once it's "used up". After I get a small area cleaned, I polish it out with a micro-fiber cloth.   The Restoration Polish did not damage the clear coat on this machine head, but it did leave a slightly yellowed cast on a couple of areas where the clear coat was damaged already.  In some rare instances in the past working on other machines, I've seen this Restoration Polish affect the clear coat, so test before using.  

For the shiny bits, used a combination of Mother's Mag metal polish plated parts, jeweler's rouge and a polishing wheel and / or a stainless steel brush on the Dremel tool for the non-plated parts such as the bobbin winder and thread tension assemblies.  The components of the bobbin winder and thread tension assemblies needed a good soak in Evapo-Rust before polishing.  I do have to confess that I did replace a couple of the original plated parts which were in sad shape.  

Most of all it was just dumb good luck to find a machine that was in such good shape under all the grime.

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John 
Northern Illinois

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John, your 27 is absolutely fantastic! Your info about the Restoration Polish is very interesting, thank you.

I have experimented with different media to remove old hardened oil residue and rust from auto parts, and are now testing them on my sewing machines. Brake cleaner or Carb cleaner on a spray can, may do a good job, but I would suggest that on bare steel/iron parts, you may try CorrosionX, and FluidFilm. 

CorrosionX use chemical attraction on an electron level to attach to the metal itself, and will penetrate and loosen old grime and rust in a short time. Amazing effect in many cases.
The company also have the world's lowest friction lubrication, SpeedX, intended for bearings in skatebords, roller skates and chains. It is based on the same technology on an electron level to adhere to the metal itself, and as it newer dries out or create any residue, it seem ideal for sewing machine lubrication. But, I fear that the attraction to electrons on surfaces, also may attract lint which has an opposite charge. I have seen some anti corrosion tests on youtube, performed on metal plates placed outdoors, where those plates treated with CorrosionX were extremely dirty compared to the others, lots of dust and insects. So, while it seek metal with opposite charge, it seem that the same effect also may attract unwanted items. It need some more testing.

FluidFilm is based on lanolin, which is extracted fat from sheep wool, and it has a quite strong odor, that some people find unpleasant. But, it is extremely good at dissolving old, hardened  grease and oil and rust, so a treatment with FF, followed by a degreasing and cleaning, will very often give you a result as if the item was new. You mention a bobbin, which would be a perfect item to clean this way. FF will creep into mechanisms, and as a lubricant, it will newer dry out or create residue. It does not attrack dust or lint. But, it stinks!
There is a version of FF which is used as anti rust treatment inside car doors. It is very thin, like an oil, and is not as smelly. The odor is said to disappear within a months time. I am testing it for dissolving hardened oil in Pfaff zigzag mechanisms, which were lubricated with a mix of petroleum and vaseline by the factory, and which dries out to leave something resembling epoxy glue! 

Both FluidFim and CorrosionX are available on spray cans. All unfamiliar products should be tested first on small items. Use disposable gloves when handling them, even if the manufacturers say that they are not harmful. Do not use them on large and painted areas, the problem may not be the products themselves, but they may require a powerful detergent if you want to remove them, and that may in turn harm any decor.

Olaf
 
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Drøbak, Norway
 
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Chaly

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Posts: 886
Reply with quote  #2 
I just ran across this resource for bentwood case decals:

https://www.singerdecals.com/bentwood-cases/
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