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Octavius

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Reply with quote  #1 
For the Supermatic that has a plug-in cable:

Power receptacle.jpg

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jrwhalley

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Reply with quote  #2 
Ray White at << http://whitesewingcenter.com >> has them new for $20 USD. You might want to pull the handwheel off and look at the drive bobbin to see if it is flat spotted, as he has the 3d printed style drive bobbins that take o-rings as the friction surface, too. Bought a new cord, a couple of drive bobbins, and a spare hook gear from him a couple of months ago and they were fine. The line cord plug doesn't seem to have anything on the US market currently that would fit, or could be safely trimmed to fit. The male terminals  on the machine are pretty much standard 2-pin non polarized size and spacing, but the outer female plug (receptacle ?) molded end is much smaller than any I could find listed in electrical or electronic supply catalogs of US vendors.
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Guy Montana

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Reply with quote  #3 
If your local sewing machine shop uses Brewer as their supplier for parts #446881 there is your part number!!  Yeah some where around $20 is fair price.  I had never heard of the white sewing center....THANKS jrwhalley!!!  New places to keep the really great machines running is awesome!  Ray's website is a GREAT resource!
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Octavius

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Reply with quote  #4 

Thanks for the replies.

jrwhalley,
Yeah, I too have searched high and low. What color was the cord from whitesewing?

Guy,
Are you sure about that cord - the opening for the 2 prongs don't look long enough?
cord.jpg 

 


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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #5 
What we did when we "hot rodded" our Elna Grasshopper to accept a singer motor (amongst other things) was to make a stainless case around it but use some of the stock green parts.  I used a 3 prong test equipment bulk head connector and then used standard test equipment/computer cord.  Here is a picture:  The little box is a control for the motor allowing me to use any lines voltage in the world 230 through 110.  This is no longer a knee control but instead has a custom stainless foot pedal that fits over the free arm when I store it in the original case (those are bobbin holders on the side of it).  Best regards, Mike
grasshopperbox.jpg

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #6 
I got one of those Chinese made Elna power cords for the old Elna Grasshopper and Supermatic and it lasted about a week before it shorted out and died. 

What I did was get one of those gray (could be another color now) 3 prong wall socked adapters that has the little tab that screws to the center wall socket cover plate screw and cut the tab and lower part of the adapter off. That leaves a two hole male adapter that will fit in the Elna plug socket. I wrapped a piece of electrical tape around the body to seal where I cut it off. It works fine and is cheap and easy to do. I just put it on the end of an extension cord and plug it in. I keep it in the drawer I have with all my Elna accessories. 

- Bruce
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Guy Montana

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Reply with quote  #7 
Try the part # 740  still at brewer.  You will have to use a local dealer as I believe they are a wholesale only.  But I am not sure.  




#740

CORD Free Rotary Elna Green 2-Prong Flat

Elna Compatible
Elna type 722010 (only for model with 2-prong power cord) Fits 2 prong Bernina 730.
Unit of Measure: EA
 


#446881

CORD Elna 9000 Power 2-Prong

Elna Compatible
Elna 5000, 6000, 7000, 8000, 9000, CLUB, DIVA Supermatic


There is 2 cords with different part #'s  But both have the same picture!  If your at a local sewing machine repair shop they might have one in stock you could take your machine down and try it.  Not having it in hand, its just a guess but I am fairly sure 90% that I am correct........ there is always that 10% till you actually try it though....... lol
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PatriciaPf

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Reply with quote  #8 
I have an original cord for the Elna grasshopper;  do you need a picture of it?
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Patty
Near Topeka, KS
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Octavius

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Reply with quote  #9 
Patty,
Thanks for you kind offer to take a picture but I think we are good to go.

Guy,
Thanks for looking that up.  Actually, I think the pictures are different and the 740 looks the ticket.
However...

Bruce,
Thanks for sharing the info on the crap replacement cords - I'm going to give your idea a try.

ke6cvh,
You are hereby excommunicated for putting a Singer motor in an Elna. May God have mercy on your soul.
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Octavius

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Reply with quote  #10 
Hey Bruce,
is this the type of connector that you modified?

adapter.jpg 



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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #11 
Yes, that is the plug I was talking about. I just cut off the ground prong and molded lug and wrapped a single layer of black electrical tape on after filing it to fit the socket easily. It works like a champ and all I need is an extension cord. You can plug it into the machine and leave it there if you like. Make one for each Elna machine if you want. 

The electrical tape ensures any exposed metal or thin spots are insulated. 

It's just too bad that extension cords generally only come in white and brown, but it's possible to make one from electrical wire and a male and female ends, of course. 

Naturally, as with anything electrical, you do so at your own risk. I know my skills and am confident using a saw, files and working with electrical parts. I know some people are not as tidy in their work. 


-Bruce

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Octavius

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Reply with quote  #12 
Bruce,
Thanks for your reasoned reply.
Cheers!
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #13 
Bruce's fix is the least intrusive to the machine and best/easiest. 

  It looks like there were plug in types as well as hard wired version on the Supermatic.  We have three here different color schemes and voltages but seldom used. 

  I'd like to try ours out with the flower foot kit since it's the only low shank machine with lots of cams here.  On our grasshopper it was seriously under powered to the point of not being usable.  Supermatics fixed this later on with a better motor. 

  The grasshopper had two versions of motor and three versions of power plug receptacle with one motor being even more underpowered than the other/later but still both in that category of NQR (Not Quite Right) unless sewing the very lightest of materials.  Overhauled machine (no thread under bobbin case) and just got tired of waiting for it to warm up with kerosene as the lube for the bobbin and still not enough oomph.  Fix here was a 220v modern motor in custom case on machine and a computer type bulkhead connector keeping original riveted name plate and vent cover.  On 110 nothing needs to be done.  On 220 it is too much power so I adjust the light dimmer/TRIAC knob on the box with accessory plugs going straight to mains voltage giving me a dial in highest power setting and rest by foot control.  For us it is the ultimate fix.  I'm likely going to take another power cord and lengthen the part coming off machine to put the outlet box with light dimmer/TRIAC farther away from machine.  

  On another thread someone talked about making plastic cams which can be done with a resin molding kit easy enough.  Does anyone have a full set of these cams?  It sure would be nice to have them all instead of trying to buy them bit at a time and ending up with multiples of some and none of others.   Best regards, Mike






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Octavius

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Reply with quote  #14 
Mike,
Thanks for that reply, very interesting.
I'm a bit disappointed to hear that the stock Grasshopper is a bit under-powered - I was actually thinking of looking for one.
Do you think it could sew through 2 layers of canvas for example? 
Cheers!
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Octavius

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Reply with quote  #15 
Bruce,
I tried your method and it worked a treat!
Fortunately, it was a 2 pack so I cut the 2nd one a bit fatter so it didn't wiggle in the receptacle.
Many thanks!
Connector.jpg 

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #16 
edited to add we have three supermatics and those machines have none of the issues the grasshopper had/has.  I even mod'd one to take a treadle belt.  We had an aluminum piece machined for it and I can treadle perfectly fine with it.  I've attached a couple pictures.  The treadle is our "frankentreadle" that had a broken leg so was mated to a Black and Decker workmate.  I have since removed the front foot rest that says "Black and Decker" so it works much better.

Best regards,
Mike

Hi Octavius,

  When I got my grasshopper I had purchased from a person in Australia who restores them and did thorough job on it.  He took allot of pride in it.  Mine came 230v.  The unit would "warm up" as I'd read others talk about and speed up due to the tight tolerances and that was with me using kerosene to oil the race as they require.  It was so underpowered that two layers of the lightest material is all I could sew with it.  It is a cool looking machine no doubt and in some ways was ahead of it's time (except the motor).  I really didn't want to do it but I mod'd mine as I'm a believer in being able to use all the machines I own and this was unusable.  With a modern motor I put in a 230v Singer Philippines replacement motor that cost me 15 US dollars in the city with foot pedal.  This was way overpowered for the machine but when I got down to 115v through a step down transformer the modern motor was just about perfect for the machine.  I put the triac light dimmer in the circuit to reduce the power available at 230v as I felt it was too much power for the little machine.  

  I guess it depends on what you're looking for.  I later bought a Kenmore portable 158.1060 that I love (except the internal motor that scares me a bit it'll be obsolete some day).  I need to use a step down transformer with it and later learned that the Cub 7 from Fister and Rossman is made by the same company, Jaguar, in Japan and the same machine but it was 230v.  So for 115v I'd recommend the 158.1060 and for 230v I'd recommend the same machine (with very minor cosmetic differences) the Fister and Rossman Cub 7 if I needed a portable with fancy zig zag, class 15 vertical hook, free arm, and built in stitches with a little oomph.  My grasshopper is now perfectly fine after the modification(s) to it however and looks fairly stock but I still need to move the triac away from the machine to make it look stock and better.  

  From what I've learned if I was to go truly portable I'd skip all that completely and go with a small but capable hand crank that could work anywhere right up to a snow storm with a kerosene lantern and a tarp over my head 😉  Just my 2 cents.

Best regards,
Mike ElnaTreadleMod.jpeg  ElnaTreadle.jpg 

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #17 
The adapter trick is one that others before me have used, but I was happy to pass it along. It beats having to make a plug using brass and Premo Sculpey, which I have also done with machines using an odd plug. 

As to the power of the Grasshopper, if anyone has successfully made canvas awnings on a Singer 221 Featherweight then they should have no problem making them on the Grasshopper. 

-Bruce
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #18 
Meant to say can be treadled or run with electricity.
Hi Bruce,

  The motor on a Grasshopper is likely underpowered compared to the tiny motor on a featherweight even though the featherweight motor says 0.4 amps (for the 115v) I've not heard the same common complaints I read over and over again in the blogs about the grasshoppers being underpowered.  The first incarnation was even less powerful so they increased it later in production but it still wasn't enough.  By the time they made the supermatic they had it right.  I've not a single problem with the motors in our three supermatics (two are 115v and one is 230v).  Now I have a motor that can get the job done it likely can sew two layers of canvas without a hitch and likely even the seams.  I've used it to sew denim after the motor change out.  I edited my post above to show the modified supermatic that now can be treadled.  Picture taken before I fixed the cross piece on the treadle.  Best regards, Mike
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #19 
I have been working with patchers recently and was reading a different post on a restoration of a 29k.  This is the last post in the V.S.S. thread with a picture.  Copied the url for it and pasting it here.....featherweight converted to hand crank under the arm of a 29k patcher (which is not much of a heavy duty machine to begin with).  I think the picture says it all.  Personally would never use the grasshopper for anything heavy on sewing and would hesitate on many medium weights.  If I owned a featherweight, which I don't and likely never will, same would apply.  Best regards, Mike
https://d28lcup14p4e72.cloudfront.net/197085/4049555/Machine140_21.jpg
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