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Margie

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Reply with quote  #1 
I have been unable to find any information about the Longford name, other than one website entry.  That person said it was a badged New Home.  I found a New Home on the Smithsonian site that looks very, very similar.

I don't have any bobbins or needles.  I don't know what to look for since I can't identify my machine.  Can anyone help? 20200825_134321.jpg I do have the wooden box it came in.  This is just the best picture of the machine.

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #2 
It's lovely -- nicely preserved decals.  It's definitely a rebadged New Home.   New Home sold them itself under the name "New National".   Hand cranks were either detachable, like yours, sometimes on a cast iron base, or sometime wood, or they were built in a more "Saxonia" fashion, like this one (mine).

The serial number can be used to date it, from this chart:  https://www.janome.com/siteassets/support/faqs/orange-ma-and-rockford-il-dates-of-manufacture.pdf

It takes a Boye 4 or 20x1 needle, or you can use a regular 15x1 if you drop it about 3/16" before tightening the clamp.  But of course you'll need a shuttle and bobbin first.  I have a spare shuttle, but no extra bobbins.  You might find someone with both...

paul

Attached Images
jpeg newnat_11.jpg (129.24 KB, 19 views)


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Margie

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you so much, Paul.  That is more information in one minute than all the hours I have spent trying to identify this machine.

Right now, it is in pieces on my workbench.  It was/is covered in a black goo.  It might be whale oil.

I have the shuttle and now I know I have a needle.  Just have to find a bobbin.
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #4 
Oh, good -- I misread your message and thought you needed the shuttle too.  A Singer bobbin (as from a 127) is a little smaller in both dimensions than the New Home bobbin, so it may rattle around, but it might work.
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Margie

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Reply with quote  #5 
This just keeps getting better and better.  I have those.

I have another question.  I only have one foot.  The one that came on the machine.  Isn't it suppose to detach from the circular screw collar?
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #6 
There are two "detachment points", if you will.

If you loosen the circular knurled nut, the foot should slide out toward the front of the machine -- the foot has a slot in it.  Normally this is the only thing you'd loosen to change feet.

It looks like you've found that loosening the screw sticking out to the right will let the whole assembly drop off the end of the presser bar.  On earlier machines the feet were different, and this was the only attachment point.

The picture shows two old feet.  You can see how much more expensive they would have been to make, plus you had to align them with the dogs every time you changed the foot.  The third thing in the picture is the clamp that goes on in place of those old feet, and lets you in stall the new simpler, self-aligning feet, like yours.

They cleverly made the new clamped feet and the old feet completely compatible.

paul

nh_feet.jpg 


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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #7 
Can you read the serial number?  

A word about putting the nose plate back on - Easy to get on upside down.

http://www.sil.si.edu/DigitalCollections/Trade-Literature/Sewing-Machines/pdf/sil10-741.pdf
and
http://needlebar.org/main/manuals/newhome/1index.html
may be helpful

Janey

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Margie

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Reply with quote  #8 
I think the serial number is 3649710.  The first number, the 3, is very hard to read.  The only other number it could be would be 8.

I have both of those manuals.  I did a lot of looking before I asked for help.  Thank you, Janey, for pointing them out and the warning.

Paul, I was pretty sure that the foot would come off the way you describe.  Mine is stuck.  If you look at the picture, you will see the gunk.  I just have to soak it longer.  I took the entire thing off with the side screw.  I did not want to damage it by being aggressive.  This is my first machine with this type foot attachment.

I love how everyone on this site is so willing to help each other.


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Margie

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Reply with quote  #9 
Paul, what did you use to clean the surface of your machine?  I have used some non-pumice Gojo.  I was very gentle.  It didn't seem to clean much.  I tested a spot on the back and underside of the bobbin winder with rubbing alcohol.  The finish came off.  Now, I am afraid to try anything else. 

The metal on mine is never going to shine, but I am getting it clean.  I really need to take the bobbin winder apart.  The last time I did that, years ago, I had to have help to put it back together.  I have been trying to find an exploded view since it is very similar to a Singer.  I guess I will just have to take pictures.

I read the subject about cleaning machines all the way through.  I did not see where anyone suggested a particular wax.  Can you?
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #10 
Non-pumice Gojo is fine -- lots of people use it.  (I've tried it, but I find it kind of messy to use.)  The rule of thumb is, nothing containing water, or alcohol.  The alcohol will attack the shellac, and if the shellac is already compromised (likely) the water will attack the decals.  Sorry you didn't know about that earlier!

Most people just use sewing machine oil to clean their machines.  I did for a long time, but now I use Orange-Glo furniture cleaner, which is strictly oil-based.  I'm not sure it does much better than straight SM oil, but it's cheaper (I think), and it makes the shop smell nice.  ;-)  As for wax -- many people use paste wax of various sorts, but for me it always gets into the oil holes and other crannies and then I have to get it out.  So I use Howards Feed 'n Wax, which is a liquid wax.  Like the Orange Glo, it's really for wood, but works fine.

For polishing metal, a good metal polish (I like Wrights Brass polish, because it rinses off easily) plus some #0000 steel wool works pretty well, after you get any real rust off.

And yes, take lots of pictures!  Take a picture before you take it apart, and as a piece comes off in your hand, take another picture of it as if you were about to put it back together.  Kind of like if you were walking in the woods and want to be able to find your way back -- taking a picture of the turn you're about to take is good, but taking a picture over your shoulder of what it looks like after you turn is even better.  :-)

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Margie

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Reply with quote  #11 
Thank you, Paul for your help.  I sound like a newbie.  I am not.  I bought my first vintage sewing machine over 35 years ago.  This one is just so dirty with black gunk that I want to be careful not to damage it while trying to clean it up.  Besides, I kind of like this one.

I am think of trying the Zymol products that the Featherweight Shops uses on Featherweights.  I have never used Orange-Glo, but I do use Howard's Feed 'n Wax.  I am going to use that on the case.  I will have to hunt down some Orange-Glo.

I have several different metal cleaners.  I have been using Simichrome.  There isn't anything under the brown dried on oil, except the base metal.  

I used rubbing alcohol not denatured alcohol.  That should not have damaged the finish, but you never know with something this old.

I will take pictures.  I will have to wash my hands between each one so that I don't make my phone look like this machine.  I tried to attach a picture of how dirty this really is, but I did something wrong.  My message got deleted.  I had to start over.  I will try to add a picture, after I post this.
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Margie

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Reply with quote  #12 
20200825_134458.jpg 
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #13 
Margie you never, ever should use any kind of alcohol on a black machine. Rubbing alcohol, as you found out, will most definitely ruin the finish. I use 91% rubbing alcohol to clean the innards and shiny bits but am very careful to never get it on the outside of a black machine. The hardened enamel paint of the colored machines can put up with it though, I've used it for cleaning up nasty spots on colored machines with no ill effects. YMMV.

Cari

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